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About to order a Dreamstation Go
#31
HNL Steve,

First thanks for the right up on the GO I'm thinking of purchasing one for my travels, Airline Pilot.

As for your question regarding pressurization I'll try and keep it simple. Most modern Aircraft from Boeing and Airbus, I've flown both, will maintain between 8-9 pounds per square inch of differential pressure at cruise flight. This will result in an aircraft cabin of around 8,000 mean sea level. The newer B787 or A350 run higher differential pressures resulting in a lower cabin altitude. I have not flown either of these so cannot comment as to actual numbers.

As for cabin location there will not be a noticeable difference in pressure with regard to where you are seated. Although, the general airflow is from from to back as the outflow valves are always located near the aft of the fuselage. This sets up a cerculation pattern that might lead to slightly stale air near the rear of the cabin. I have no data to support this just time tested experience. In the old days you would have been amazed at the nicotine staining towards the rear of the plane from smokers.

I hope this helps and please keep us updated on the GO especially if they/you get a humidifier for the unit.

GuppyDRV
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#32
Honolulu Steve, when you tried the hme with your Dreamwear gear did you do anything with the vents on the mask? I assume for the hme to produce results you'd have to have a closed circuit ahead of it so your exhaled breath is not lost before the hme can trap the moisture. Which actually makes me nervous when I think about fiddling with the designed leak rate of a mask. Seems like there'd be a potential to make yourself sick or worse. Thus the Airmini approach to propietary mask circuits I would imagine. I am hoping someone who has some time with an hme will post their take on it's performance. Also anxious to get some information on the future Dreamstation Go humidifier. Really about the only thing holding me back from a purchase of one or the other at this point.

GuppyDRV, always interesting to hear the mechanics of an airliner they're amazing machinery to me. Wondering what the expected impact on o2 sat is in an airliner at altitude in general. As on edge as people are these days I'm wondering what the neighboring seat would think if I pulled out an oximeter...
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#33
(06-02-2017, 01:43 PM)loganpass Wrote: Honolulu Steve, when you tried the hme with your Dreamwear gear did you do anything with the vents on the mask? I assume for the hme to produce results you'd have to have a closed circuit ahead of it so your exhaled breath is not lost before the hme can trap the moisture. Which actually makes me nervous when I think about fiddling with the designed leak rate of a mask. Seems like there'd be a potential to make yourself sick or worse. Thus the Airmini approach to propietary mask circuits I would imagine. I am hoping someone who has some time with an hme will post their take on it's performance. Also anxious to get some information on the future Dreamstation Go humidifier. Really about the only thing holding me back from a purchase of one or the other at this point.

GuppyDRV, always interesting to hear the mechanics of an airliner they're amazing machinery to me. Wondering what the expected impact on o2 sat is in an airliner at altitude in general. As on edge as people are these days I'm wondering what the neighboring seat would think if I pulled out an oximeter...

Loganpass,

I'm not sure about O2 sat's as that's not something we learn. I'll ask a technical ninja I know for a better answer. I'm sure somewhere there is information on this subject as more than one physically handicapped traveler has flown on a plane and needed this information.

GuppyDRV
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#34
(06-02-2017, 01:43 PM)loganpass Wrote: Honolulu Steve, when you tried the hme with your Dreamwear gear did you do anything with the vents on the mask? I assume for the hme to produce results you'd have to have a closed circuit ahead of it so your exhaled breath is not lost before the hme can trap the moisture. Which actually makes me nervous when I think about fiddling with the designed leak rate of a mask. Seems like there'd be a potential to make yourself sick or worse. Thus the Airmini approach to propietary mask circuits I would imagine. I am hoping someone who has some time with an hme will post their take on it's performance. Also anxious to get some information on the future Dreamstation Go humidifier. Really about the only thing holding me back from a purchase of one or the other at this point.

GuppyDRV, always interesting to hear the mechanics of an airliner they're amazing machinery to me. Wondering what the expected impact on o2 sat is in an airliner at altitude in general. As on edge as people are these days I'm wondering what the neighboring seat would think if I pulled out an oximeter...

loganpass, 
I did not modify my mask but I did place the filter between the hose and the mask connection for the Dreamwear (top of the head). It is likely that the HME did not receive enough exhaled breath to effectively trap much moisture as there are vents at the nasal pillow and at the top of the head on the connector.  On the other hand, I did not notice my nasal passages being drier than normal even on the plane. If I was serious about trapping moisture, I would take apart the HME filter, cut up the sponge and place the sponge pieces in the tubing along side of the face just proximal to the nasal pillow. This would be even easier with the P10.
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#35
(06-03-2017, 06:10 AM)Hono Wrote:  If I was serious about trapping moisture, I would take apart the HME filter, cut up the sponge and place the sponge pieces in the tubing along side of the face just proximal to the nasal pillow.

Has anyone tried this?  I tried using the HME at the top of the Dreamwear mask also, which didn't work at all. 

Would be very grateful if anyone can tell me whether/how the cut and place in tubing idea works.  Putting off ordering travel machine until I know if there's a way to keep using the Dreamwear mask.  It's soooo much better than anything else I've used in almost 7 years.
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#36
I just got a Dreamstation Go and am iffy about it.

I used the same Mirage FX mask that I use with my nearly-silent Respironics System One and with a slightly noisy (IMO) Devilbiss Intellipap that I had been using as a travel machine. The System One uses its proprietary 15mm heated light tube and I was using a fairly stiff 22mm Devilbiss tube with the Intellipap.

I was astounded at the Go's hose noise, particularly during inhalation and exhalation, the first night. Philips recommended trying a larger tube than the 12mm that shipped with it (smaller for portability, the Philips person said), and I switched to the 22mm Devilbiss hose. That was better - more of a consistent white noise sound. I tried a 15mm lightweight hose last night and I was back to a more noticeable inhale-exhale sound.

I bought the machine for some backpacking in which I will be staying in group bunkhouses (hostels) and I'm concerned about the noise.

For others with this machine, does this sound normal? Is it possible that my specific machine is noisy due to some manufacturing anomaly?

Does the tube size make a difference? What about the quality of the tube (my 15mm is a generic cheapie)?
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#37
Sadly, yes this has been my experience as well. Still, the hose noise with the Dreamstation Go is significantly lower than with other portable machines. My previous travel CPAP was a Transcend, and while I've dealt with the hose noise for 5 years (I travel 80 to 100 nights a year), the Transcend made me sound like Darth Vader. I've heard similar reports on the other travel CPAPs - Z1 and AirMini - so I guess its all relative.

Given how much I travel and my desire to not check luggage and not carry a third bag for the CPAP, I personally think that the Dreamstation Go is a winner. even with the hose noise. It is still significantly quieter than the other travel CPAPs, is easier to pack than the Transcend (which has an unusual shape), has an integrated power supply (so fewer parts and less to pack), the 12mm hose takes up less space and is easier to sleep with, and it doesn't slide off the nightstand (a problem with the other travel CPAPs). People have reported that the hose noise is barely noticeable by a sleeping partner, though I haven't tested that out on my wife yet.

FYI, my mask is the AirFit P10, and in my case I did not notice any significant noise reduction with a standard size hose. And I only notice the noise on exhale, not on inhale.
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#38
Thanks for the reply about your experience. 

As I wrote, I noticed a significant difference in inhale/exhale with the 22mm stiff Devilbiss tubes, so I just ordered some lightweight 22mm tubes to see if I can tune this thing as best I can to balance travel convenience/annoyance to others. The 12mm is a definite go when I know I will be traveling alone.

BTW, the bluetooth connection is amazingly poor (needs to reconnect every day), but the machine overall seems a decent advance. Only problem is I need one now, not the one that will be 10x better five years from now.  Smile
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#39
Recently I decided to research and purchase a new travel APAP for frequent trips from California to northern Europe. A typical trip includes 10.5 hour KLM 787-9 overnight flights from SFO to AMS. I scoured various apnea boards and watched YouTube videos for data about the Phillips Respironics Go and ResMed Mini. You may see the following as an infomercial for the Phillips Respironics Go (hereafter Go), but I have no connection to any CPAP company. I just want to add one person’s experience in researching and buying and using the Go.

I’ve used a CPAP/APAP for almost five years with usually about 2 AHI with a prescription min/max of 4-9. I have used a ResMed S9 and S10 (with and without humidifiers) and a HMD Z1 (and have its battery pack). I very much like the S9; it's reliable and solid and quiet. The S10 on a short trial seemed noisier and bulkier. The S9’s and S10’s algorithm does tend to stay at upper limits, for good or bad, after you happen to hit apneas or hypopneas. After many trials, I (and my wife) tolerate the Z1 well but it is noisier than the S9. For me, both machines require you to carry too many things if you travel (even without humidifiers). The S9 with its cumbersome brick is quite heavy and has an easily damaged electrical connect. The nice but bulky S9 carrying case adds one more piece of luggage to any trip. For travel, the Z1, although very small, effectively requires not only the basic machine, but also a mandatory plastic insert between the machine and its tube, an optional Q Tube insert for quieter nights, and a heavy brick with cables on both ends. (The S9 provides really basic information on the machine’s own screen. The Z1 has never worked smoothly with my iPhone 7 iOS 10, even after long conversations with HMD’s friendly technical support staff.)

In light of these facts with the advent of new travel machines, I decided to buy either a ResMed Mini or a Respironics Go. I was dissuaded from the Mini, despite my familiarity with the ResMed algorithm, by its cumbersome HIE insert, its strict limitation to a few proprietary mask types, and, most important, the various (possibly accurate or inaccurate) reports of high tube noise levels. I was persuaded to purchase the Go by its thoughtful integration of all components into one elegant piece. The entire Go unit, about 2 inches in width in its taut travel case, and its simple (no brick) electrical cord and tube slip easily into my computer travel bag.

I now use the Go full time.  So far, the Go itself seems to be an extremely flexible, extremely quiet device. The Go effortlessly provides to a smart phone more information than the S9 or Z1 on the Go screen or via its dedicated Blue Tooth app. (Your doctor (or you) very easily can alter the pressure limits once you know the Go’s simple medical entry protocol which can be found via this site.) The Go adjusts to use any manufacturer's various tube sizes, 12, 15, and 22, and comes with its excellent proprietary very light weight, very compact 12 mm tube. Unlike the Mini, the Go is compatible with any type of mask or nasal pillows. The Go unit appears to be very well built and has no elements that would snag (or get lost) in carry-on or checked luggage.

To my eye, the Go has the perfect, if somewhat pricey, proprietary Go battery solution. The very solid basic machine and the companion battery slide into each other to yield a fairly compact single unit.  You can leave the add-on battery attached to the APAP or CPAP Go and, if power fails, the battery automatically starts. Alternatively you can charge the battery on the side and use it when you know you will not have an electrical outlet available. The battery will run the Go for about a dozen hours at moderate CPAP 10 levels. The Go currently does not have a humidifier but quite clearly has been designed for the addition at some future date.

My overall impression is that the Go’s designers were determined to avoid earlier travel CPAP issues and to make travel simple.  At the moment, after two weeks of use, my perhaps too diligent research about alternatives appears to have yielded a really good solution for a person who wants a travel with an APAP or CPAP that also can be used full time at home. The current pricing for the APAP appears to be about $849 for the APAP and $799 for the CPAP and $299 for the battery pack.
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#40
I'm glad you like it because I want to like it, too, and for the reasons you mentioned, not just because of the "endowment effect"! 

What tube and mask are you using? Do you not have the noticeable objectionable inhale/exhale noise from it?

Edit: to clarify that I am asking whether the inhale/exhale sounds are too loud, not just noticeable.
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