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Ahi question
#1
So if you get an AHI within 5 does it mean you don't have sleep apnea and don't need to use the cpap or there are other factors too.
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#2
You have sleep apnea if your AHI is greater than 5 without the CPAP machine. If you get it under 5 on CPAP then you still have sleep apnea but it's treated.

Ed Seedhouse
VA7SDH

The above is my opinion.  It is just possible that I may, occasionally, be mistaken.

I am neither a Doctor, nor any other kind of medical professional.

Everything put together sooner or later falls apart.
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#3
Mine is always below 5. Inspite of that I saw a big difference when I started cpap a month ago. My day time sleepiness is almost gone. Wonder if my sleep study was flawed and the numbers were not correct. My ahi during sleep study was 8. Just confused why I see such a difference if I just had mild apnea. Anyway I am not complaining.
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#4
(01-17-2016, 10:31 PM)Sharif Wrote: Mine is always below 5. Inspite of that I saw a big difference when I started cpap a month ago. My day time sleepiness is almost gone. Wonder if my sleep study was flawed and the numbers were not correct. My ahi during sleep study was 8.
Your comments are confusing and seem to contradict each other. The only way I can interpret them is I'm thinking maybe you don't realize that using your cpap machine is supposed to make your AHI numbers lower than when you had your study? In which case yes, they should be lower then your sleep study numbers, that's what the machine is for, to stop as many of the AHI events as possible.

In my case for example I had 40 AHI per hour during my sleep study, with my cpap machine I now average less than 1 AHI per hour.

Did I guess correctly what you meant? If so, how many AHI are you seeing when using your machine?



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#5
I had 8 AHI during my sleep study. So why they even put me on cpap therapy. Currently my AHI is Below 3. I am doubting that my sleep study AHI was wrong and could have been higher
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#6
(01-17-2016, 10:53 PM)Sharif Wrote: I had 8 AHI during my sleep study. So why they even put me on cpap therapy.
The higher the AHI number the worse it is. Any number above 5 qualifies as apnea, so if your sleep study measured 8, it means you have apnea.

Quote:Currently my AHI is Below 3. I am doubting that my sleep study AHI was wrong and could have been higher
If when you say that currently your AHI is 3, you mean when using your cpap machine, than that means it's working - it's helping cure your apnea. That's why it's 3 now, lower is better.

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#7
(01-17-2016, 10:53 PM)Sharif Wrote: I had 8 AHI during my sleep study. So why they even put me on cpap therapy.

8 events per hour is one every 7.5 minutes. That's enough to ruin your sleep quality, cause daytime sleepiness, and increase your risk of a heart attack or stroke.

Plus, those events could have each lasted much longer than the minimum of 10 seconds, and they could have lowered your blood oxygen level. No way to tell without looking at the details of the sleep study results.

Quote:Currently my AHI is Below 3. I am doubting that my sleep study AHI was wrong and could have been higher

Below 3 events per hour is significantly better than 8. Plus, those events could be lasting barely 10 seconds and there might be no drop in blood oxygen level. And as you continue to use your CPAP machine it's likely to drop even further.



Sleepster
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#8
Hi Sharif

Accurate AHI on a sleep study can depend on how long you slept - my relative couldn't sleep much during her hospital sleep study and only clocked up 2 hours or so - the results came back that she only had mild apnea based on a two hour sleep period - I doubt she even got to REM sleep in her sleep study. They told her to lose some weight and the apnea would go away? However, she lost the weight and still snores like a chainsaw like I did before CPAP treatment. The relative has not gone back since 5-6 years ago to re-test because she was told that she only had mild apnea and thinks she has cured her problem with the weight loss.

My sleep study (8hours+) demonstrated significant REM related obstructive sleep hypopnoea/apnoea with desaturations to a nadir Sa02 of 73%. My overall AHI = 12.8/hr however my supine REM AHI = 62.5/hr and REM AHI = 26.1/

so even though my AHI was 12.8/hour my REM sleep AHI was dramatic and my airways were completely shutting down for long periods of time so hence the diagnosis of Severe Sleep Apnea. My sleep study showed in REM sleep I was very compromised and it was dangerous and sent my blood pressure readings into the 200+ in the mornings.

I guess what I am thinking is that everyone is so different - and an overall AHI = 8 may not be the defining indicator on whether your apnea is MILD|MODERATE|SEVERE as there are other indicators like 02 saturation in your blood being very low during the night etc.

Anyways, I am now getting less than 0.5 AHI readings and it is all because of the my CPAP therapy. Sleep-well

digressing here slightly and as a newbie CPAP user - I was wondering why my treatment of 4-12 on the same machine was giving me excellent results and Sharif was on a pressure of 18 - which would just blow my head off I reckon? Thinking-about




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