Hello Guest, Welcome to Apnea Board !
As a guest, you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use.
To post a message, you must create a free account using a valid email address.

or Create an Account


New Posts   Today's Posts

Alcohol Improving Centrals and Hypopneas?
#1
Hi,

I seem to have my obstructive apneas under control, but I'm still struggling with getting my AHI under 5. It typically fluctuates between 6 and 11 depending on the night. These are almost exclusively centrals and hypopneas.

I am not a big drinker, and generally only drink on special occasions, but I have noticed that my best few nights as far as centrals and hypopneas were after I had had two or three drinks.

Last night I had 2 wines and my AHI was 2.8, which is the lowest I have ever had.

I don't have enough nights recorded that I have consumed alcohol to draw any definite conclusion, but has anyone else found that alcohol in the evening has actually improved central apneas or hypopneas?
Post Reply Post Reply
#2
Sauron, alcohol normally has the opposite effect as it is a sedative or relaxant and thats not want you want, similar to some meds. So many different things can effect your AHI from weather, food you eat, when you eat, meds, etc, etc, etc. In my case in Australia, we are having extremely hot nights around 30c and my AHI has gone from around 1-2 to around 6. I don't seem to be doing much else different but know it will come back down when the weather cools down. You still need to look into why your AHI is above 5.
Post Reply Post Reply
#3
Alcohol is a biphasic drug. First it's a depressant then a stimulant.
It tends to fragment sleep. No matter what your AHI might be; ETOH makes for poor sleep quality.
INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
Post Reply Post Reply


#4
(01-15-2014, 09:58 PM)Tez62 Wrote: Sauron, alcohol normally has the opposite effect as it is a sedative or relaxant and thats not want you want, similar to some meds. So many different things can effect your AHI from weather, food you eat, when you eat, meds, etc, etc, etc. In my case in Australia, we are having extremely hot nights around 30c and my AHI has gone from around 1-2 to around 6. I don't seem to be doing much else different but know it will come back down when the weather cools down. You still need to look into why your AHI is above 5.

I know alcohol typically worsens obstructive apneas. but i wasn't sure if it had any known effect on centrals or hypopneas as i don't really understand what causes them.
Post Reply Post Reply
#5
I'd say it's unlikely as alcohol generally worsens sleep, probably just a coincidence. Are you just starting out? It's likely the centrals will go away.
Post Reply Post Reply
#6
Centrals are caused by basically your brain telling your nervous system not to bother breathing. That is the way my sleep specialist expained it to me.
Post Reply Post Reply


#7
I would tend to think that the reason your AHI's were down to 2.8 (or within the less than 5 range) is maybe you are adjusting to your therapy now. Without seeing your data, it would be hard to know what was happening while you were sleeping. Your leaks may have been better, among other things. As the others have said, alcohol usually isn't a great idea, especially close to the time you are going to bed, when you have apnea. Centrals can happen when you are going to sleep or waking back up or from the pressure of your machine. I am not sure how long you have been on CPAP therapy, but, if you are a new CPAP user, as you adjust to the therapy, centrals will likely go away. I would suggest watching your data to see what is going on, especially last night when you said your AHI was the lowest it has been.
Post Reply Post Reply
#8
Alcohol is a nervous depressant, and will not improve or lessen central apnoeas. The correlation you see is likely from other factors, and not from the booze.
Post Reply Post Reply
#9
I agree with everyone. I enjoy a couple glasses of wine in the evening. If I have three or drink them close to bedtime my results get noticeably worse. Initially a little buzz helps me fall asleep, but later awake with increased heart beat and breathing. Same goes for eating rich, spicy food close to bedtime.
Post Reply Post Reply


#10
(01-15-2014, 09:30 PM)Sauron Wrote: I don't have enough nights recorded that I have consumed alcohol to draw any definite conclusion, but has anyone else found that alcohol in the evening has actually improved central apneas or hypopneas?
I,m on the mend, not a drop of wine touched my lips since the start of the new year, the temptation is there, not easy to be on the straight and narrow. Don,t entertain the idea, a glass or two ... might come a time when more than a glass or two needed for the same effect ... slippery slope
Post Reply Post Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
Gross AHI is getting worse. Having more centrals Amdx64 19 609 Yesterday, 05:04 PM
Last Post: Beej
Surprised Worse centrals without auto, but fewer OA's. Where to go from here? hopefulsleeper 1 106 02-15-2017, 09:50 AM
Last Post: Sleeprider
Question How Long Before Centrals Subside hartikka 19 863 02-08-2017, 10:33 AM
Last Post: Sleeprider
  Are these false centrals nadprok 6 248 02-01-2017, 10:20 PM
Last Post: nadprok
  Almost at my 1 year mark - Centrals Question MeDee 3 271 01-27-2017, 10:55 AM
Last Post: Sleeprider
  Totally Confused by Airsense 10 Data - Centrals - Problem machine... ? mymontreal 40 2,583 01-01-2017, 09:20 PM
Last Post: richb
  Question on mostly hypopneas DanPrado 4 320 12-31-2016, 05:32 PM
Last Post: DanPrado

Forum Jump:

New Posts   Today's Posts




About Apnea Board

Apnea Board is an educational web site designed to empower Sleep Apnea patients.

For any more information, please use our contact form.