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All Things Sauerkraut
#11
Sauerkraut is pretty easy to make. You can get all fancy with a stoneware crock with fitted stones and a water sealed lid made especially for fermentation, or you can use any food grade plastic pail (never use anything metal when making sauerkraut), a plate slightly smaller than the pail, a clean jug full of water (or something else that's clean and heavy to put on top of the plate) and a cloth to cover the whole thing.

Shred the cabbage the pack a couple of inches thick in the bottom of the pail, sprinkle about a tablespoon of kosher salt on it then pack a couple more inches in and then another Tbs of salt...repeat until you are out of cabbage or the pail is 3/4 full, whichever comes first. Put the plate in with the weight on top (by this time the cabbage will have bled enough liquid that the cabbage should be submerged). It is important to keep the cabbage below the surface of the liquid. Cover with a cloth, put in a cool place for at least 4 weeks (but 6 weeks is better, 8 is better still).

Skim the stuff off the top of the liquid (if there is any) before lifting the weight and plate and retrieving the sauerkraut.

A lot of people like putting other stuff in with the cabbage at the start (the fermenting cabbage will preserve other fruits and veggies as long as they stay mixed in with the cabbage and below the surface). A lot of folks around here like to throw in apple slices and carroway seeds (which I consider to be an affront to all humanity). I don't like sweet or fruity sauerkraut...I prefer it as just plain old cabbage sauerkraut. Every once in a great while I'll chop up 4 or 5 habanero peppers and add them to the mix (about 1 pepper per layer), but I have to eat that whole batch by myself (nobody else seems to want more after 1 taste).

I like Sauerkraut raw best, but will cook it along with sausages (like DocWils mentioned) or with a pork loin.
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#12
Anyone do the entire dig a hole in the ground and bury it for a month- thing?
*I* am not a DOCTOR or any type of Health Care Professional. My thoughts/suggestions/ideas are strictly only my opinions.

"Only two defining forces have ever offered to die for you. Jesus Christ and the American Soldier. One died for your Soul, the other for your Freedom."
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#13
(01-28-2014, 12:07 AM)Peter_C Wrote: Anyone do the entire dig a hole in the ground and bury it for a month- thing?

You talking about "kimchee"? As much as I like sauerkraut, this stuff sounds disgusting.
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#14
I just remember it from MASH...
*I* am not a DOCTOR or any type of Health Care Professional. My thoughts/suggestions/ideas are strictly only my opinions.

"Only two defining forces have ever offered to die for you. Jesus Christ and the American Soldier. One died for your Soul, the other for your Freedom."
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#15
(01-27-2014, 06:34 AM)DocWils Wrote: The Swiss way - you boil potatoes and sausage, preferably long thing ones (we use chicken sausages in our home, but wurst is the normal thing) and heat up the sauerkraut (careful, there are two types of sauerkraut - the type for eating cold and the type for eating hot) - serve the potatoes still steaming with a bit of butter, the kraut in heaps next to it and the sausage on the side or on top with mustard. Simple, 15 minute meal.

This is very interesting. I have a lot to learn: cold kraut, hot kraut.
This is good hearty delicious food Doc. I am now thinking my honeymoon trip with my soon to be bride will be to Europe. We both love good cooking. She is the engine that could when it comes to research and development. ... good food on the table. I am more the set up the crocks and develop a calendar, list ingredients, add the ingredients, on to the best part. Eating.

If you or anyone have a desire to remember a favorite café/ restaurant in Europe that is not the expensive tourist place but serves the best food on earth I think all of us gastronomes(fledglings like me included) would love to hear about it.
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#16
JGjones1972, this sounds like the method. I have a some six gallon food grade buckets I keep grains and what not in. Until I find the crocks for sale one of these will get me started.
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#17
(01-28-2014, 10:55 AM)PollCat Wrote:
(01-28-2014, 12:07 AM)Peter_C Wrote: Anyone do the entire dig a hole in the ground and bury it for a month- thing?

You talking about "kimchee"? As much as I like sauerkraut, this stuff sounds disgusting.

Actually here in Alaska there are still lots of people still partially living the old ways loving the traditional Native foods. I am not real knowledgeable on these but I will happily try them if I get the opportunity. Rotten fishheads and seal flipper are considered mighty fine cuisine when properly prepared. The ground temperature is cold up here and remains constant at just above freezing at the right depth. So yes the fermentation requires a hole in the ground, time, and good ingredients. Rarely does anyone die from eating a recipe gone wrong but it has happened here. There is a way to do it right.
If I have a choice between grandparents and the government food inspectors I will choose grandparents every time.
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#18
Goodonya - Europe is a big place - where are going? Cities would help to narrow down eating choices.
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#19
(01-29-2014, 05:03 PM)DocWils Wrote: Goodonya - Europe is a big place - where are going? Cities would help to narrow down eating choices.
Australia is even bigger, we have really nice restaurants here too
Quality fresh local produce and wines to match
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#20
Aussie wine? Yeah, all right, some good stuff, but I prefer French any day. My sister in law has an olive and honey farm in Tuscany and she keeps sending up local wines (well, do you really argue with a good Vino Nobile Di Montepulciano?), despite my general distaste for Italian wines (too fruity). And the Montepulciano region does some pretty good stuff. In the middle ages other princes would go to war with Montepulciano just to get the wine.

Actually, the best Pinot Noire I have ever had was from Thurgau, here in Switzerland, not an area you would associate with good wine making (one would think more of the Swiss Romande for wines, Thurgau for apples (Most Indien is it's nickname - go look up what Most is in the Internet) - nonetheless, there are some fantastic, award winning small châteaus up Thurgau way. I have had some top vintages from there.
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