Post Reply 
Alpha intrusions
Author Message
jshu43 Offline

Members

Posts: 6
Joined: Dec 2013

Machine: none
Mask Type: Not using mask
Mask Make & Model: none
Humidifier: none
CPAP Pressure: none
CPAP Software: Not using software

Other Comments:

Sex: Female
Location:

Post: #1
Alpha intrusions
Saw this in my sleep study report:

Alpha intrusions were seen. This was especially evident during slow wave sleep as "alpha-delta pattern". This is associated with the complaint of non-restorative sleep and has been seen in fibromyalgia and chronic pain syndromes. This has also been in patients with mild sleep-disordered breathing.

I have Fibromyalgia so that makes sense. But I'm not familiar with alpha intrusions. Is there any way to treat this?
12-25-2013 10:48 PM
Find all posts by this user Post Reply Quote this message in a reply

Donate to Apnea Board
vsheline Offline

Advisory Members

Posts: 1,908
Joined: Jul 2012

Machine: S9 VPAP Adapt (USA Model# 36007, not better 36037 or 36067)
Mask Type: Full face mask
Mask Make & Model: F10 or SimPlus w/ 2Liners. MirageQuatro & Gecko gel pad
Humidifier: H5i
CPAP Pressure: 15 EPAP, PS 5-10
CPAP Software: ResScan

Other Comments: Marfan Syndrome, chronic bradycardia, occasional Cheyne-Stokes Respiration

Sex: Male
Location: California, USA

Post: #2
RE: Alpha intrusions
(12-25-2013 10:48 PM)jshu43 Wrote:  Saw this in my sleep study report:

Alpha intrusions were seen. This was especially evident during slow wave sleep as "alpha-delta pattern". This is associated with the complaint of non-restorative sleep and has been seen in fibromyalgia and chronic pain syndromes. This has also been in patients with mild sleep-disordered breathing.

I have Fibromyalgia so that makes sense. But I'm not familiar with alpha intrusions. Is there any way to treat this?

Hi jshu43, welcome to the forum!

RERAs are considered "mild sleep-disordered breathing."

Perhaps treating the RERAs with bi-level treatment would help eliminate the alpha intrusions?

Again, here is link to Dr Krakow's explanation of why bi-level treatment eliminates RERAs:
http://www.apneaboard.com/forums/Thread-...-and-BiPAP

Take care,
--- Vaughn

Membership in the Advisory Member group should not be understood as in any way implying medical expertise or qualification for advising Sleep Apnea patients concerning their treatment. The Advisory Member group provides advice and suggestions to Apnea Board administrators and staff on matters concerning Apnea Board operation and administrative policies - not on matters concerning treatment for Sleep Apnea. I think it is now too late to change the name of the group but I think Voting Member group would perhaps have been a more descriptive name for the group.
(This post was last modified: 12-26-2013 01:34 AM by vsheline.)
12-25-2013 11:31 PM
Find all posts by this user Post Reply Quote this message in a reply
zonk Offline

Advisory Members

Posts: 7,908
Joined: Feb 2012

Machine: A10 AutoSet
Mask Type: Nasal mask
Mask Make & Model: Activa LT
Humidifier: Integrated /ClimateLineAir
CPAP Pressure: 9/13
CPAP Software: ResScan

Other Comments: CPAP since Nov 2010

Sex: Male
Location: Australia

Post: #3
RE: Alpha intrusions
Alpha intrusion indicate insufficient quality of sleep, maybe link to fibromyalgia and explain your sleep study results posted here
http://www.apneaboard.com/forums/Thread-...8#pid53378
12-26-2013 12:08 AM
Find all posts by this user Post Reply Quote this message in a reply

Donate to Apnea Board
jshu43 Offline

Members

Posts: 6
Joined: Dec 2013

Machine: none
Mask Type: Not using mask
Mask Make & Model: none
Humidifier: none
CPAP Pressure: none
CPAP Software: Not using software

Other Comments:

Sex: Female
Location:

Post: #4
RE: Alpha intrusions
Thanks! I did read this but am still a bit confused. UARS, RERA's, and sleep intrusions are all the same?

But the sleep study seems strange in that the only recommendation there was Obstructive Sleep Apnea and a CPAP. But perhaps I need a BiPap. I'm not sure what to do about it.
12-26-2013 12:23 AM
Find all posts by this user Post Reply Quote this message in a reply
zonk Offline

Advisory Members

Posts: 7,908
Joined: Feb 2012

Machine: A10 AutoSet
Mask Type: Nasal mask
Mask Make & Model: Activa LT
Humidifier: Integrated /ClimateLineAir
CPAP Pressure: 9/13
CPAP Software: ResScan

Other Comments: CPAP since Nov 2010

Sex: Male
Location: Australia

Post: #5
RE: Alpha intrusions
(12-26-2013 12:23 AM)jshu43 Wrote:  But perhaps I need a BiPap. I'm not sure what to do about it.
Your doctor is the best person to ask for advice
We can only give you some ideas to discuss with your doctor

Edit: if you,re in US and have insurance, maybe insurance require CPAP to be tried and failed before BIPAP can be prescribed
(This post was last modified: 12-26-2013 12:44 AM by zonk.)
12-26-2013 12:37 AM
Find all posts by this user Post Reply Quote this message in a reply

Donate to Apnea Board
vsheline Offline

Advisory Members

Posts: 1,908
Joined: Jul 2012

Machine: S9 VPAP Adapt (USA Model# 36007, not better 36037 or 36067)
Mask Type: Full face mask
Mask Make & Model: F10 or SimPlus w/ 2Liners. MirageQuatro & Gecko gel pad
Humidifier: H5i
CPAP Pressure: 15 EPAP, PS 5-10
CPAP Software: ResScan

Other Comments: Marfan Syndrome, chronic bradycardia, occasional Cheyne-Stokes Respiration

Sex: Male
Location: California, USA

Post: #6
RE: Alpha intrusions
(12-26-2013 12:23 AM)jshu43 Wrote:  Thanks! I did read this but am still a bit confused. UARS, RERA's, and sleep intrusions are all the same?

But the sleep study seems strange in that the only recommendation there was Obstructive Sleep Apnea and a CPAP. But perhaps I need a BiPap. I'm not sure what to do about it.

Hi jshu43,

Alpha intrusions are brain-wave patterns indicating sleep stage is being affected.

RERAs are arousals caused by the breathing effort needed to overcome upper airway resistance. (I don't know whether RERAs are associated with alpha intrusions, but maybe RERAs are one possible cause of alpha intrusions?)

The C in CPAP does not mean constant as in one fixed pressure. The C means Continuous, as is provided by all Continuous Positive Airway Pressure machines, whether fixed-pressure or auto-adjusting or bi-level. They are all types of CPAP machines.

Take care.
--- Vaughn


From Wikipedia:

Types of alpha waves

Some researchers posit that there are at least three forms of alpha waves, which may all have different functions in the wake-sleep cycle.

Alpha waves are present at different stages of the wake-sleep cycle. The most widely-researched is during the relaxed mental state, where the subject is at rest with eyes closed, but is not tired or asleep. This alpha activity is centered in the occipital lobe, and is presumed to originate there, although there has been recent speculation that it instead has a thalamic origin.[5] This wave begins appearing at around four months, and is initially a frequency of 4 waves per second. The mature alpha wave, at 10 waves per second, is firmly established by age 3.[6]

The second occurrence of alpha wave activity is during REM sleep. As opposed to the awake form of alpha activity, this form is located in a frontal-central location in the brain. The purpose of alpha activity during REM sleep has yet to be fully understood. Currently, there are arguments that alpha patterns are a normal part of REM sleep, and for the notion that it indicates a semi-arousal period. It has been suggested that this alpha activity is inversely related to REM sleep pressure.

The third occurrence of alpha wave activity is the alpha-delta or slow-wave (SWS) state. This activity spreads across the brain in an anterior-posterior gradient.[7]

It has long been believed that alpha waves indicate a wakeful period during sleep. This has been attributed to studies where subjects report non-refreshing sleep and have EEG records reporting high levels of alpha intrusion into sleep. This occurrence is known as alpha wave intrusion.[8] However, it is possible that these explanations may be misleading, as they only focus on alpha waves being generated from the occipital lobe.



[5] Domino E. F., Ni L. S., et. al(2009). Tobacco smoking produces widespread dominant brainwave alpha frequency increases. International Journal of Psychophysiology. 74(3):192-198.
[6] Niedermeyer E.(1997). Alpha rhythms as physiological and abnormal phenomena. International Journal of Psychophysiology. 26(1-3):31-49.
[7] Pivik R. T., Harman K. (1995). A Reconceptualization of EEG alpha activity as an index of arousal during sleep: all alpha activity is not equal. Journal of Sleep Research. 4(3):131-137.
[8] Allas Task Force (1992). ASDA report on EEG arousals: scoring rules and examples. Sleep. 15(2):173-184.

Membership in the Advisory Member group should not be understood as in any way implying medical expertise or qualification for advising Sleep Apnea patients concerning their treatment. The Advisory Member group provides advice and suggestions to Apnea Board administrators and staff on matters concerning Apnea Board operation and administrative policies - not on matters concerning treatment for Sleep Apnea. I think it is now too late to change the name of the group but I think Voting Member group would perhaps have been a more descriptive name for the group.
(This post was last modified: 12-26-2013 01:36 AM by vsheline.)
12-26-2013 01:15 AM
Find all posts by this user Post Reply Quote this message in a reply
zonk Offline

Advisory Members

Posts: 7,908
Joined: Feb 2012

Machine: A10 AutoSet
Mask Type: Nasal mask
Mask Make & Model: Activa LT
Humidifier: Integrated /ClimateLineAir
CPAP Pressure: 9/13
CPAP Software: ResScan

Other Comments: CPAP since Nov 2010

Sex: Male
Location: Australia

Post: #7
RE: Alpha intrusions
(12-26-2013 01:15 AM)vsheline Wrote:  They are all types of CPAP machines.
Yes but your insurance billing codes are different for each machine
CPAP/APAP E0601
Bilevel E0470
http://www.resmed.com/us/documents/10134...ilevel.pdf
12-26-2013 01:24 AM
Find all posts by this user Post Reply Quote this message in a reply

Donate to Apnea Board
Post Reply 


Forum Jump:

Who's Online (Complete List)