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Anesthesia Concerns...Should I use CPAP in Recovery?
#31
GP49 -

I'm glad things turned out well for you. I think it is good for all of us to learn new things, even when we aren't planning to do so. Smile
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#32
I'm having colonoscopy next week, met the anaesthetic doctor few days ago and she said to bring CPAP, might need it in recovery and just in case. I haven't brought my CPAP with me for day surgery procedures in the past
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#33
GrammaBear, when I worked in the OR there were a few different ways the anesthetists were assigned. Sometimes they worked with a certain doctor because of personalities,sometimes they were assigned a suite and they stayed there all day...it just depends on the hospital.

A word of advise for anyone while in the hospital or while a loved one is in the hospital: if you are having trouble getting your needs heard, call the hospital operator and ask for the hospital ombudsmen. Every hospital has at least one and their job is to be an advocate for you.
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#34
Thanks everyone for all the advice. I will definitely be a "squeaky wheel" in this next week.
Calling hospital on Monday to speak with anesthesiologist, and how they handle apnea patients.

I get tired of hearing..."relax, we do this all the time". That may be so, but I've had one bad experience and don't plan to repeat it!

Again, thanks to all who responded. I take each one of your suggestions very seriously.



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#35
(07-24-2015, 11:29 PM)Starrbelie Wrote: GrammaBear, when I worked in the OR there were a few different ways the anesthetists were assigned. Sometimes they worked with a certain doctor because of personalities,sometimes they were assigned a suite and they stayed there all day...it just depends on the hospital.

A word of advise for anyone while in the hospital or while a loved one is in the hospital: if you are having trouble getting your needs heard, call the hospital operator and ask for the hospital ombudsmen. Every hospital has at least one and their job is to be an advocate for you.

Is there another name for this person you call an ombudsmen? The hospital where I'm going is in a relatively smaller town of 150,000 and in all of the years I've lived here, never knew of such a person.

I don't want to hijack the OPs thread but I've already been told to plan on giving up control of my diabetes the minute I enter the hospital - as a diabetic with good control, that upsets me to some degree. No one will tell me 'when' they plan on returning my control to me.

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#36
(07-25-2015, 06:07 AM)OpalRose Wrote: Thanks everyone for all the advice. I will definitely be a "squeaky wheel" in this next week.
Calling hospital on Monday to speak with anesthesiologist, and how they handle apnea patients.

I get tired of hearing..."relax, we do this all the time". That may be so, but I've had one bad experience and don't plan to repeat it!

Again, thanks to all who responded. I take each one of your suggestions very seriously.

Do let us know how your conversation with hospital goes because it might help those of us who have yet to experience this situation.

On a lighter note, my Dad always told me when I was a child that the "squeaky wheel gets the grease". Funny but I never understood what he was trying to teach me - then. Now that I'm old, I do understand.
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#37
Quote:Is there another name for this person you call an ombudsmen? The hospital where I'm going is in a relatively smaller town of 150,000 and in all of the years I've lived here, never knew of such a person.

I don't want to hijack the OPs thread but I've already been told to plan on giving up control of my diabetes the minute I enter the hospital - as a diabetic with good control, that upsets me to some degree. No one will tell me 'when' they plan on returning my control to me.

They also might be called patient service representatives or something similar.

Regarding the issue with your diabetes, I would push for an answer as to what they mean as giving up control is not a good thing if you end being worse. Is there a doctor on your team willing to advocate for you? You could also see about getting help from a patient service rep/ombudsmen but the quality of help is variable from my experiences.

It is simply not acceptable dismissing your concerns about this and I wouldn't take no for answer.

49er

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#38
(07-25-2015, 07:56 AM)49er Wrote:
Quote:Is there another name for this person you call an ombudsmen? The hospital where I'm going is in a relatively smaller town of 150,000 and in all of the years I've lived here, never knew of such a person.

I don't want to hijack the OPs thread but I've already been told to plan on giving up control of my diabetes the minute I enter the hospital - as a diabetic with good control, that upsets me to some degree. No one will tell me 'when' they plan on returning my control to me.

They also might be called patient service representatives or something similar.

Regarding the issue with your diabetes, I would push for an answer as to what they mean as giving up control is not a good thing if you end being worse. Is there a doctor on your team willing to advocate for you? You could also see about getting help from a patient service rep/ombudsmen but the quality of help is variable from my experiences.

It is simply not acceptable dismissing your concerns about this and I wouldn't take no for answer.

49er

When I had a consult with the gynecologist, I told her that I use an insulin pump and that I wanted to keep it attached to me during surgery. I was told "Isn't going to happen because it is 'hospital policy' to use a different approach with diabetic patients on insulin." Also was told that if I didn't like that, I could find another surgeon and another hospital. The reason given for denying my request was that if the gynecologist needs to use cauterization during surgery she didn't want me to get burned where the pump infusion set is inserted nor did she want the pump to be affected itself by current? I just want to get this procedure ""done and over with"" Sad

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#39
(07-25-2015, 08:02 AM)GrammaBear Wrote:
(07-25-2015, 07:56 AM)49er Wrote:
Quote:Is there another name for this person you call an ombudsmen? The hospital where I'm going is in a relatively smaller town of 150,000 and in all of the years I've lived here, never knew of such a person.

I don't want to hijack the OPs thread but I've already been told to plan on giving up control of my diabetes the minute I enter the hospital - as a diabetic with good control, that upsets me to some degree. No one will tell me 'when' they plan on returning my control to me.

They also might be called patient service representatives or something similar.

Regarding the issue with your diabetes, I would push for an answer as to what they mean as giving up control is not a good thing if you end being worse. Is there a doctor on your team willing to advocate for you? You could also see about getting help from a patient service rep/ombudsmen but the quality of help is variable from my experiences.

It is simply not acceptable dismissing your concerns about this and I wouldn't take no for answer.

49er

When I had a consult with the gynecologist, I told her that I use an insulin pump and that I wanted to keep it attached to me during surgery. I was told "Isn't going to happen because it is 'hospital policy' to use a different approach with diabetic patients on insulin." Also was told that if I didn't like that, I could find another surgeon and another hospital. The reason given for denying my request was that if the gynecologist needs to use cauterization during surgery she didn't want me to get burned where the pump infusion set is inserted nor did she want the pump to be affected itself by current? I just want to get this procedure ""done and over with"" Sad

Arrgh, you're in a tough position. How soon would they able to go back to your system once the surgery was over? You seemed to imply it would stay this way while you were hospitalized. But is that really medically necessary? And how would your blood glucose levels be affected?

What is tough about dealing with doctors and hospitals is it is hard to determine what policies can't be adapted for safety reasons and which ones can be. It sounds like in your case, speaking as a wanne be docSmile that your gynecologist has a good point. But it seems if they are switching systems, they need to explain their plan of action in more detail as to how things will work.

Have you been able to find any research that helps you understand these issues and frame some questions that would help advance the dialogue with your doctor?

49er
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#40
(07-25-2015, 08:20 AM)49er Wrote:
(07-25-2015, 08:02 AM)GrammaBear Wrote:
(07-25-2015, 07:56 AM)49er Wrote: They also might be called patient service representatives or something similar.

Regarding the issue with your diabetes, I would push for an answer as to what they mean as giving up control is not a good thing if you end being worse. Is there a doctor on your team willing to advocate for you? You could also see about getting help from a patient service rep/ombudsmen but the quality of help is variable from my experiences.

It is simply not acceptable dismissing your concerns about this and I wouldn't take no for answer.

49er

When I had a consult with the gynecologist, I told her that I use an insulin pump and that I wanted to keep it attached to me during surgery. I was told "Isn't going to happen because it is 'hospital policy' to use a different approach with diabetic patients on insulin." Also was told that if I didn't like that, I could find another surgeon and another hospital. The reason given for denying my request was that if the gynecologist needs to use cauterization during surgery she didn't want me to get burned where the pump infusion set is inserted nor did she want the pump to be affected itself by current? I just want to get this procedure ""done and over with"" Sad

Arrgh, you're in a tough position. How soon would they able to go back to your system once the surgery was over? You seemed to imply it would stay this way while you were hospitalized. But is that really medically necessary? And how would your blood glucose levels be affected?

What is tough about dealing with doctors and hospitals is it is hard to determine what policies can't be adapted for safety reasons and which ones can be. It sounds like in your case, speaking as a wanne be docSmile that your gynecologist has a good point. But it seems if they are switching systems, they need to explain their plan of action in more detail as to how things will work.

Have you been able to find any research that helps you understand these issues and frame some questions that would help advance the dialogue with your doctor?

49er

I have a 'registration' phone consult with a surgical nurse from the hospital next Tuesday and I plan to ask her if I can be back on the pump as soon as I wake up in recovery? If she says 'No', then I want to hear a logical reason why not? My insulin pump is out of warranty and to buy a new one would cost me a lot of money - which is why I am approaching this cautiously. The hospital's insulin protocol is 30 years outdated and if I ever hope to pave the way for change there, I have to be reasonable and try to work with them, not against them. People on insulin are at the mercy of whoever set the policy how many years ago and who may or may not have kept himself updated on said protocols.

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