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Anesthesia Concerns...Should I use CPAP in Recovery?
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49er Offline

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Post: #41
RE: Anesthesia Concerns...Should I use CPAP in Recovery?
Quote:I have a 'registration' phone consult with a surgical nurse from the hospital next Tuesday and I plan to ask her if I can be back on the pump as soon as I wake up in recovery? If she says 'No', then I want to hear a logical reason why not? My insulin pump is out of warranty and to buy a new one would cost me a lot of money - which is why I am approaching this cautiously. The hospital's insulin protocol is 30 years outdated and if I ever hope to pave the way for change there, I have to be reasonable and try to work with them, not against them. People on insulin are at the mercy of whoever set the policy how many years ago and who may or may not have kept himself updated on said protocols.

Best of luck with that as it seems putting you back on the pump upon waking up in recovery would be very reasonable. Wow, an insulin protocol being 30 years outdated? Unbelievable.

49er
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07-25-2015 08:55 AM
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OpalRose Offline

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Post: #42
RE: Anesthesia Concerns...Should I use CPAP in Recovery?
49er,
Yep, I think the hospitals have a certain mindset or they are used to doing things a certain way for so long, then someone comes along and questions their routine and they don't like it.

Just an example, I was reading in the AARP magazine concerning the hospitals advice on no food or drink after midnight. Now there seems to be some evidence that the body is slower to heal after surgery when this advice is taken, especially for older patients.

And when I went for blood work a few weeks ago, I didn't eat or drink after midnight and the nurse said the are rethinking that advice at least for liquids. There seems to be evidence in some patients, which I fall into, that the veins actually collapse when fasting and is harder for them to get the needle in the vein.

Thanks for all your help, and hope your procedure goes well too. Let us know.

OpalRose
07-25-2015 09:36 AM
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GrammaBear Offline

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Post: #43
RE: Anesthesia Concerns...Should I use CPAP in Recovery?
(07-25-2015 09:36 AM)OpalRose Wrote:  49er,
Yep, I think the hospitals have a certain mindset or they are used to doing things a certain way for so long, then someone comes along and questions their routine and they don't like it.

Just an example, I was reading in the AARP magazine concerning the hospitals advice on no food or drink after midnight. Now there seems to be some evidence that the body is slower to heal after surgery when this advice is taken, especially for older patients.

And when I went for blood work a few weeks ago, I didn't eat or drink after midnight and the nurse said the are rethinking that advice at least for liquids. There seems to be evidence in some patients, which I fall into, that the veins actually collapse when fasting and is harder for them to get the needle in the vein.

Thanks for all your help, and hope your procedure goes well too. Let us know.

OpalRose -

I have also found the same situation regarding fasting but perhaps allowing liquids before lab bloodwork is drawn. My veins are tiny and when I fast for more than 8 hours it is most difficult for the 'blood-sucker' to find my veins at all. I almost always end up with a huge bruise before I leave the building. Finally the lab tech told me to drink a glass of water at least one hour before I come in for blood draws. Now I rarely bruise - which is definitely appreciated by me. I'm thinking a surgical fast is much different though.

Good luck to you and I wish you well and a speedy recovery.
07-25-2015 09:52 AM
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49er Offline

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Post: #44
RE: Anesthesia Concerns...Should I use CPAP in Recovery?
(07-25-2015 09:36 AM)OpalRose Wrote:  49er,
Yep, I think the hospitals have a certain mindset or they are used to doing things a certain way for so long, then someone comes along and questions their routine and they don't like it.

Just an example, I was reading in the AARP magazine concerning the hospitals advice on no food or drink after midnight. Now there seems to be some evidence that the body is slower to heal after surgery when this advice is taken, especially for older patients.

And when I went for blood work a few weeks ago, I didn't eat or drink after midnight and the nurse said the are rethinking that advice at least for liquids. There seems to be evidence in some patients, which I fall into, that the veins actually collapse when fasting and is harder for them to get the needle in the vein.

Thanks for all your help, and hope your procedure goes well too. Let us know.

Hi OpalRose,

I am smiling as I read your post because prior to my septoplasty, I read about the revised preoperative fasting guidelines.

http://www.beckershospitalreview.com/ane...sting.html

Solid food can be eaten up to 6 hours before surgery and clear liquids 2 hours.

A surgeon I corresponded with about this issue said one reason hospitals are still anal retentive on the NPO after midnight issue is they claim that if patients stick to this philosophy, it is easier to move surgery times up in case of cancellation. But he said that rarely happens.

Anyway, my surgeon refused to budge on this issue as he felt the safest course of action was to be NPO after midnight. But because he was very flexible on medication issues that most ENTs aren't on which I felt was alot more important to me health wise, I felt it was not worth fighting about. I simply made sure I stayed up until midnight and hydrated myself as much as possible and ate a bedtime snack. I did fine.

Interestingly, another hospital I considered having the surgery done at last year had a variation on the policy. They allowed clear liquids up until 6 hours before the surgery but requested that solid foods be stopped after midnight. Is it any wonder that patients are so frustrated?
07-25-2015 10:02 AM
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DocWils Offline

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Post: #45
RE: Anesthesia Concerns...Should I use CPAP in Recovery?
There is nothing against drinking water for most types of blood draws (there are exceptions even for that, of course, but your Dracula will tell you in advance). Unless it is important for the blood viscosity levels, as it is in a few types of tests, drinking water will have little or not effect, even when you are supposed to have fasted. However, any other liquid than pure, clean water (including flavoured waters and even clear sodas) is a no-no - it messes with your sugar and electrolyte levels. Also, while there is no prohibition in most case for water, don't drown yourself in it - it will also produce false readings. A glass of water when you need it, especially an hour or so before the blood draw is fine, and a sip if you feel hungry or faint, to stave off those feelings, is just fine. No coffee, sodas, mineral waters or any other such stuff, though.

Fasting after midnight for morning ops is still correct, and not only because they can be moved up - we don't want you throwing up in your mask, or post op (it happens more often than you think, even on an empty stomach) or other such complications. I have had it happen, and it nearly cost the patient their life, so just go with us on this. Since most ops are scheduled for morning if you have an overnight stay, it is easiest to put a fast on after midnight. There is a ton of prep happening pre op - up to an hour or more depending on the op, so just because your op is scheduled to 9 or 10 in the morning doesn't mean you can figure you can eat up until 2 in the morning - you can't.

Meds will depend on the type of med and the danger of interaction with the anaesthesia - that will be up to the surgeon and the gas-passer to decide. Insulin usually is pretty safe except for the odd type of op procedure, but other types of meds can be a problem, and again, I have people get into real trouble on the table because they insisted on taking their own meds despite the warnings. Some, like MAO inhibitors can't be simply stopped six hours before the op and be out of the system, it takes longer, and for those we have to rethink our procedures and be very careful.

Also, cardiac aspirin is not a great idea if you are going under a full narcosis - there is a mild stroke risk, and a high bleeding risk, and with the exception of extreme heart conditions, there is no reason to not skip a dose if you are going under the knife.
07-26-2015 01:17 PM
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OpalRose Offline

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Post: #46
RE: Anesthesia Concerns...Should I use CPAP in Recovery?
UPDATE ON SURGERY!
Well, made it through the "minor surgery" with flying colors!
Had surgery this morning, and any of you reading my posts here know that I was a bit paranoid over having anesthesia because of a previous bad experience, and how it would be handled as far as being a sleep apnea patient.

Apparently, the hospital listened to my concerns and questions, because upon admittance, they asked if I had my CPAP machine and mask, which of course I did!

Before surgery, the anesthesologist and nurse anesthetist spent a lot of time answering my questions, and explained what they would do as far as having to intubate if needed, and that they did not anticipate having to do so. It turned out that the anesthesiologist's father has sleep apnea and he was very well versed in the subject. I was assured that I would be monitored the entire time. They even told me that after surgery, at my request, in recovery room that they would make sure my bed was elevated so that I would not be laying flat.
It turned out that I did not need my CPAP and that my oxygen levels stayed well above 95%.

So it turned out not to be such a bad experience, and I would say to anyone anticipating surgery, ask questions untill you get answers. Be a squeaky wheel so to speak.

Now to recover and heal, was told I can't drive for a few days! Thinking-about

OpalRose
07-30-2015 05:03 PM
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GrammaBear Offline

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Post: #47
RE: Anesthesia Concerns...Should I use CPAP in Recovery?
(07-30-2015 05:03 PM)OpalRose Wrote:  UPDATE ON SURGERY!
Well, made it through the "minor surgery" with flying colors!
Had surgery this morning, and any of you reading my posts here know that I was a bit paranoid over having anesthesia because of a previous bad experience, and how it would be handled as far as being a sleep apnea patient.

Apparently, the hospital listened to my concerns and questions, because upon admittance, they asked if I had my CPAP machine and mask, which of course I did!

Before surgery, the anesthesologist and nurse anesthetist spent a lot of time answering my questions, and explained what they would do as far as having to intubate if needed, and that they did not anticipate having to do so. It turned out that the anesthesiologist's father has sleep apnea and he was very well versed in the subject. I was assured that I would be monitored the entire time. They even told me that after surgery, at my request, in recovery room that they would make sure my bed was elevated so that I would not be laying flat.
It turned out that I did not need my CPAP and that my oxygen levels stayed well above 95%.

So it turned out not to be such a bad experience, and I would say to anyone anticipating surgery, ask questions untill you get answers. Be a squeaky wheel so to speak.

Now to recover and heal, was told I can't drive for a few days! Thinking-about

I am happy for you, first of all because your 'minor' surgery is over and second of all because your voice was heard and understood when it came to your concerns.

Can I ask what kind of anesthesia you had? I will be having general anesthesia and for a variety of reasons I'm definitely not looking forward to the experience.

I bet you will sleep good tonight with not having to worry about surgery. Take care my friend and be good to yourself. Smile
07-30-2015 05:21 PM
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Post: #48
RE: Anesthesia Concerns...Should I use CPAP in Recovery?
good to have that overwith! yay!

هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه
Tongue Suck Technique for prevention of mouth breathing:
  • Place your tongue behind your front teeth on the roof of your mouth
  • let your tongue fill the space between the upper molars
  • gently suck to form a light vacuum
Practising during the day can help you to keep it at night

هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه
07-30-2015 05:40 PM
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OpalRose Offline

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Post: #49
RE: Anesthesia Concerns...Should I use CPAP in Recovery?
(07-30-2015 05:21 PM)GrammaBear Wrote:  
(07-30-2015 05:03 PM)OpalRose Wrote:  UPDATE ON SURGERY!
Well, made it through the "minor surgery" with flying colors!
Had surgery this morning, and any of you reading my posts here know that I was a bit paranoid over having anesthesia because of a previous bad experience, and how it would be handled as far as being a sleep apnea patient.

Apparently, the hospital listened to my concerns and questions, because upon admittance, they asked if I had my CPAP machine and mask, which of course I did!

Before surgery, the anesthesologist and nurse anesthetist spent a lot of time answering my questions, and explained what they would do as far as having to intubate if needed, and that they did not anticipate having to do so. It turned out that the anesthesiologist's father has sleep apnea and he was very well versed in the subject. I was assured that I would be monitored the entire time. They even told me that after surgery, at my request, in recovery room that they would make sure my bed was elevated so that I would not be laying flat.
It turned out that I did not need my CPAP and that my oxygen levels stayed well above 95%.

So it turned out not to be such a bad experience, and I would say to anyone anticipating surgery, ask questions untill you get answers. Be a squeaky wheel so to speak.

Now to recover and heal, was told I can't drive for a few days! Thinking-about

I am happy for you, first of all because your 'minor' surgery is over and second of all because your voice was heard and understood when it came to your concerns.

Can I ask what kind of anesthesia you had? I will be having general anesthesia and for a variety of reasons I'm definitely not looking forward to the experience.

I bet you will sleep good tonight with not having to worry about surgery. Take care my friend and be good to yourself. Smile

GrammaBear,
I can understand your feelings toward having general anesthesia, as I had a previous
bad experience with, but knowing now that my apnea may have contributed to my experience and at the time I did not know I had sleep apnea.

I was told they used LMAC (local monitored anesthesia care) with the knowledge that I may feel some discomfort (pain). I have to admit that it went very fast or seemed to, but I did feel some discomfort.

Thank you for your concern, and I know your surgery is coming up soon. Pray all goes well for you.

OpalRose
07-30-2015 06:26 PM
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OpalRose Offline

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Post: #50
RE: Anesthesia Concerns...Should I use CPAP in Recovery?
(07-30-2015 05:40 PM)DariaVader Wrote:  good to have that overwith! yay!


Thanks DariaVader,
I'm glad that 's over with too. I'm not the best patient!

OpalRose
07-30-2015 06:30 PM
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