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Anesthesia management for CSA?
#11
RE: Anesthesia management for CSA?
Intubation is invasive ventilation and can overcome any form of apnea or cessation of breathing effort. If it is determined you need this, it is normally applied immediately after anesthesia takes effect, and a ventilator will breathe for you. No spontaneous effort is needed or desired with mechanical ventilation. You should simply discuss the fact you have CSA with your anesthesiologist. He will discuss options, however it is unlikely he will rely on your spontaneous breathing with that condition. He will tell you exactly his plan for anesthesia and respiratory support. This forum can help you to better understand and manage complex and central apnea diring sleep, however mechanical ventilation during surgery is strictly in the hands of your anesthesiologist. Before surgery, usually in the prep-room, be sure to have a consultation where you can explain your conditions and concerns. I have never had a procedure where the anesthesiologist did not visit, ask me about apnea and other conditions, and examine my airway. Never is general anesthesia applied without provisions for full respiratory support being avialble, however it seems likely that they will just start you out on it.
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#12
RE: Anesthesia management for CSA?
intubated patients will be attached to a ventilator that will breathe for you. the meds they give will knock out your respiratory drive. post surgery, after meds wear out, will be when the apnea is of concern.
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#13
RE: Anesthesia management for CSA?
I don't suffer with CSA.  And no, I was never intubated.  There was never a need for that.
I had a very attentive anesthesiologist team that watched my breathing and continually monitored my oxygen levels.  

As I stated, talk to the doctor, nurses and the anesthesiologists. Once you do that, I feel your worries over this would be put at ease.
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INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE.  ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA.  INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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#14
RE: Anesthesia management for CSA?
For surgery I have always been intubated. That means a tube goes down your throat, and a machine gives you your breaths. They would put the tube in after the anesthesia kicked in, so I was not aware of it, and they would take the tube out just as I was starting to regain consciousness. It didn't hurt, though my throat was a little sore for a day.

During recovery, you will be observed to make sure you are doing OK. Have your machine with you, and be sure the anesthesiologist tells the recovery-room nurses you have CSA. They may well want to set you up with your machine while you are in recovery.

It would be very helpful if you could fill out your profile with information about your machine and mask. I'm assuming you have some kind of ASV machine; is that right?

As others have said, the biggest thing for you to do is to talk with the anesthesiologist ahead of time and explain you have CENTRAL sleep apnea. When they hear "apnea," they may assume it is only "obstructive," so you need to be really clear about this.
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