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Anyone know the best CPAPs for dry camping?
#1
Question 
Hubby & I go boondocking quite a bit with our trailer, so I know I'll be looking for a CPAP machine that doesn't use up a lot of power. It'd be great if it was also compact, but it's not a necessity. Anyone have knowledge or experience on dry camping with a CPAP?

I also have to take into consideration that based on my sleep lab report and how my titration study goes, I may need a ASV. Forgive my ignorance, but I am not sure if that's a totally different type of machine, or just a CPAP machine that is "ASV" capable. That being said...

1) If I don't need an ASV - what are the best options out there for a multifunction CPAP that uses less power?

2) If I do need an ASV - what exactly is it? And are my options?

Thanks for any and all advice offered! Smile

-Ailu
Reformed CPAP Outlaw
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#2
I had a thread here last week asking about camping and CPAP. ASV (Auto-Servo Ventilation) machines will likely need more power than a straight CPAP. Power requirements also vary with your needed pressure.

Here's what the end results were:

If you have no weight limitations, the easiest way to go is a PR System One machine and a 12 volt deep cycle AGM marine battery. Run the humidifier on "pass over" mode or just take it off if you can. Depending on your pressure, a PR System One can be as little as 0.3AH/hr to 1AH/hr. Lead acids can cheaply (~$100) get you 50 AH of power, which should be good for 5-10 days depending.

Resmed systems run on 24v power supplies, so you'd need an adapter for them to run off most batteries.

If weight is an issue, you're going to want to look at the Lithium Iron Phosphate batteries. They are drop-in replacements for 12v lead acid batteries but are MUCH lighter. Make sure to get Deep Cycle, not starter batteries. A 10AH one will run you about $150 shipped, depending. They're under 4lb though and will likely get you 2 nights of operation. Make sure to disconnect the machine when not in use so you don't waste battery when not sleeping. An inline switch may be a good option. Prices spike FAST for higher AH LiFeSO4 batteries.

You'll still need a charger and a power source for charging the batteries. You can charge off Solar panels, but I have no clue how many panels you'd need to top off the battery during the day enough to compensate for your use at night.

Otherwise, just search for "camping" and you'll find quite a few threads.
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#3
Wow thanks lmoretti for all the great info! Apologize for missing your thread on this earlier.

Right, I really have no weight limitations, just concerned about power usage. Thank you for helping me realize that a ResMed machine just wouldn't work for me, because of this. So I'll be looking to go with a PR system One.

Just had my Titration study last night, so I won't know if I'll need a ASV machine until another week or so, when I get the results. If there's no ASV that will work for 12 volt, we'll have to choose plug-in campgounds, which would take a lot of the fun out of camping, bcause we enjoy remote boondocking the best. Sad


(06-12-2015, 03:11 PM)lmoretti Wrote: I had a thread here last week asking about camping and CPAP. ASV (Auto-Servo Ventilation) machines will likely need more power than a straight CPAP. Power requirements also vary with your needed pressure.

Here's what the end results were:

If you have no weight limitations, the easiest way to go is a PR System One machine and a 12 volt deep cycle AGM marine battery. Run the humidifier on "pass over" mode or just take it off if you can. Depending on your pressure, a PR System One can be as little as 0.3AH/hr to 1AH/hr. Lead acids can cheaply (~$100) get you 50 AH of power, which should be good for 5-10 days depending.

Resmed systems run on 24v power supplies, so you'd need an adapter for them to run off most batteries.

If weight is an issue, you're going to want to look at the Lithium Iron Phosphate batteries. They are drop-in replacements for 12v lead acid batteries but are MUCH lighter. Make sure to get Deep Cycle, not starter batteries. A 10AH one will run you about $150 shipped, depending. They're under 4lb though and will likely get you 2 nights of operation. Make sure to disconnect the machine when not in use so you don't waste battery when not sleeping. An inline switch may be a good option. Prices spike FAST for higher AH LiFeSO4 batteries.

You'll still need a charger and a power source for charging the batteries. You can charge off Solar panels, but I have no clue how many panels you'd need to top off the battery during the day enough to compensate for your use at night.

Otherwise, just search for "camping" and you'll find quite a few threads.

-Ailu
Reformed CPAP Outlaw
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#4
What is dry camping?
Every time I ever went camping it rained cats and dogs!
I use my PAP machine nightly and I feel great!
Updated: Philips Respironics System One (60 Series)
RemStar BiPAP Auto with Bi-FlexModel 760P -
Rise Time x3 Fixed Bi-Level EPAP 9.0 IPAP 11.5 (cmH2O)
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#5
You can buy 12V adapters for Resmed Machines, it's just an extra cost and variable in the mix that's going to steal some power from your battery, reducing the amount of time you have. If you're running a beefy 100AH+ battery it's probably not a big deal, but if you're trying to squeeze the most time out of a small <5lb battery it may be an issue.
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#6
Def: Dry Camping is taking the trailer to a site with no hookups -- no water, electricity, no sewage hookup.

Ailu: I assume you intend to sleep in the trailer; and run your CPAP off a battery that supplies power to the trailer.
Likely a deep cycle, lead-acid 12 Volt Battery. If so, I think you are essentially set.

I would make sure that battery is big (in terms of Amp-Hrs); fairly new; and independent from the tow vehicle.
To conserve power, you may need to run without humidity.
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#7
Thanks JustMongo! We have two 6 volt batteries in our trailer, fairly new too. I'm wondering how much of a drain would a PR System One put on it, running the whole night (w/o the humidifier on)... If we are minimalists regarding other electrical items, would a few solar panels be able to keep up with it? Or would we definitely need to run a generator a few hours a day?
-Ailu
Reformed CPAP Outlaw
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#8
Well, to extend above:

If you need 10AH of power per night, you'd need to change the same amount during the day. 10AH/8H charge time = ~1.25Amps. 1.25A * 12V = 15 Watts. You can buy 15 Watt panels from Harbor Freight for ~$70. I'd buy at least two, as you're going to be dealing with cloudy days and not be able to reach 100% efficiency even on sunny days. If you go with a large lead acid battery (50-100AH) and 2-3 solar panels you should be able to keep the batteries charged long term for extended camping trips.

Unfortunately, it's going to involve some experimentation as actual real world efficiency is hard to calculate and there are lots of variables.

HF also sells a 45 watt kit that looks fairly complete (3 panels, charger, etc) for $190. Add a Marine battery and you'd probably be good. Much better deal than buying the panels yourself and then figuring out the electronics.
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#9
100 Watt panels with a PWM charge controller can be obtained for less than US $200.
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#10
(06-15-2015, 01:37 PM)lmoretti Wrote: Well, to extend above:

If you need 10AH of power per night, you'd need to change the same amount during the day. 10AH/8H charge time = ~1.25Amps. 1.25A * 12V = 15 Watts. You can buy 15 Watt panels from Harbor Freight for ~$70. I'd buy at least two, as you're going to be dealing with cloudy days and not be able to reach 100% efficiency even on sunny days. If you go with a large lead acid battery (50-100AH) and 2-3 solar panels you should be able to keep the batteries charged long term for extended camping trips.

Unfortunately, it's going to involve some experimentation as actual real world efficiency is hard to calculate and there are lots of variables.

HF also sells a 45 watt kit that looks fairly complete (3 panels, charger, etc) for $190. Add a Marine battery and you'd probably be good. Much better deal than buying the panels yourself and then figuring out the electronics.

Better deals elsewhere. Sorry but not gonna risk the commercial link chewing.

I use my PAP machine nightly and I feel great!
Updated: Philips Respironics System One (60 Series)
RemStar BiPAP Auto with Bi-FlexModel 760P -
Rise Time x3 Fixed Bi-Level EPAP 9.0 IPAP 11.5 (cmH2O)
Post Reply Post Reply


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