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Apnea and IBS
#11
RE: Apnea and IBS
I don't have IBS (and I do have Central apnea), while my friend has OSA and horrific IBS that has hospitalised her at times (and yes, I mean IBS, not IBD, though you'd never guess it - either that or her doctors are quacking as badly as mine LOL).

She, too, found that the BIGGEST difference was FODMAPS. And it's not as simple as can or can't eat it for many foods, it is the sum total of different FODMAPS and how they interact, so she can consume food x sometimes, but only if she hasn't also had other foods like Y and Z, and then she will consume X and immediately end up regretting it. She also has an overactive peristalsis effect throughout her GI tract - any meal and sometimes just a snack or drink, will immediately send her to the bathroom within 10-30 minutes, pretty much.

But yeah, lack of sleep, or disturbed sleep, is bound to potentially worsen ANY health condition, including IBS. It doesn't necessarily mean that there's causality between the two, though. It'd be interesting to see that poll though.
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#12
RE: Apnea and IBS
Great call on FODMAP for IBS. Like your friend I’ve been on the diet for a while for IBS and it helps a lot. It is a bit complex to follow, but there are good websites and mobile apps to help. A good place to start is with the creators of the diet, Monash Uni in Australia.

https://www.monashfodmap.com/about-fodmap-and-ibs/
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#13
RE: Apnea and IBS
Thank you for the post. I have eliminated 90% of gluten and lactose. I find that there are so many foods that just do not feel good. I have found out that some probiotics help.
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#14
RE: Apnea and IBS
FODMAP diet is how I confirmed my dairy intolerance. When I started it I didn't realize there were so many lactose free dairy options so I cut out dairy completely. About 2 weeks in I was starting to feel better but I realized there were many lactose free dairy options so I started to eat them and started feeling mediocre again. So then I cut it out completely and then all of my symptoms started to improve confirming that I had a dairy protein intolerance. 

I haven't done the low FODMAP diet again per say but especially with my cutting out of gluten this year I am on the lower end of FODMAP most days. I still get digestive issues but have found that antimicrobial supplements used for SIBO help me out and I use them every 3-4 months. I just started another round about a week ago and am already starting to realize some benefit. I don't post as much about the SIBO side even though I believe it is/was a significant factor simply because I don't yet understand if that is truly the issue (potentially have some other positive effect from the supplements I take to treat it), what is causing it, or how to get rid of it and keep it away.

Two of the symptoms I get from dairy and gluten I swear is one of the explanations for my original positive home test for apnea and how I have now tested negative in two in-clinic tests. Those symptoms are geographic tongue and tongue swelling which was/is visible by signs like scalloping from my tongue pressing on my teeth. Both of these symptoms noticeably improved when I went dairy free but still remained until I went gluten free as well. I still get the odd bit but don't know what triggers it, if another food or something else. 

I don't think it is a coincidence that many people that suffer from apnea also suffer from all the same symptoms I did (reflux, IBS, nasal congestion) and I believe tongue swelling from these digestive/immune related reactions is a significant factor in apnea. As part of my recent neck fracture I got this neat CT image and you can see how it wouldn't take much swelling of my tongue to further impinge on my airway. That area is already arguably the spot with highest restriction (other than maybe nasal passage) and that image was taken in an awake state so who knows what tongue does in relaxed sleep state.

Edit: This is the reason I bring up this subject and my experiences so often on here. I believe it is a significant factor that is often overlooked by modern medicine because of their poor understanding and capability in diagnosing these issues.


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#15
RE: Apnea and IBS
I was just thinking I probably have some old imaging I could compare to and sure enough my first MRI was pre diet changes and shows just enough of the airway to offer comparison, unfortunately my original CT doesn't go low enough.

In the old MRI it appears there is no empty space for my tongue in my oral cavity and my tongue appears to be pushing back on both soft palate/uvula as well as my epiglottis. In the new CT there is space on top of my tongue, space between tongue and epiglottis and although my tongue is still pushing back on uvula there is more space between the back of my throat and both uvula and tongue.

I believe this supports my beliefs that my reduction of GT and tongue scalloping has coincided with a reduction of tongue size/swelling and that this may be part of the reason I supposedly no longer have apnea. Another reason I believe is my reduction in nasal congestion which was also was caused by the diet changes.


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#16
RE: Apnea and IBS
Hello,

Just want to add that I too had IBS-like symptoms before my sleep apnea was diagnosed. It was to the point where I was late for work because I had spent so much time in the bathroom in the morning. Once I was on PAP therapy for  3 months, things calmed down. At 5 months it calmed down even more. I also removed dairy from my diet, which helped enormously. I think the sympathetic nervous system goes into overdrive at night when you can't breathe and all your organs are ramped up and acting like there is no tomorrow. At least, that is how I felt. CPAP really helped quiet everything down, though dietary changes are also needed.
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