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Bad sleep study experience
#11
Personally, at my sleep study follow-up appt, my dr said my AHI/RHI (?) was 7.6, and my score on the sleepiness test wasn't bad at all, so he suggested just "thinking about it" for a month. I told him that I've been utterly exhausted for years, and I don't think anything is going to change in a month, so even if I'm considered "mild", how about we give this cpap thing a whirl and see if it can be helpful.

What do ya know?, xPAP has been a LIFE changer for me!!!!!

So... I do think it's worth pursuing.

I'm interested in what your dr will say, considering your lack of sleep during the study. It's hard to sleep in the study (IMO), so I figure those results have got to be skewed.
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#12
My first study I had absolutely no events. I didn't even snore which is not normal for me. My PCP told me that I don't have sleep apnea and that he didn't care that my husband witnesses apnea. So I found a sleep specialist who got my insurance to cover another sleep study and then that one showed that I did have sleep apea. Oh and it was at a differnt lab! I have several health issues and I am a RN and I quickly have learned you are the only one who cares about your health in the mess of health care and insurance so raise hell!!!
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#13
(04-22-2017, 11:01 AM)Adiamond87 Wrote: ...I am a RN and I quickly have learned you are the only one who cares about your health in the mess of health care and insurance so raise hell!!!

I think that's a bit too pessimistic.  But I think it's fair to say that no one cares more about your health than you do and no one knows you better than you do.  And the chance that you will find someone who equals you in both those areas is pretty small.
Ed Seedhouse
VA7SDH

Your brain is not the boss.

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#14
Have you considered asking for an auto machine and self-titration? It would save a night in a sleep clinic, net you a better machine, and get you going sooner. Most insurance allows it, the clinics and DMEs don't like it. You know your medical rights in terms of declining a test or requesting a different approach.
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#15
Hey guys I was able to get my study results and not sure what to think about these. I was surprised by the amount of sleep I got. To be honest I don't buy that I was asleep all that time since I know how many times I was awaken....and how trashed I felt after the study Unsure  The result says that I should have yet another study done with the mask (titration)??? Please let me know what do you think. I do pay for all of this from my pocket so it is important for me to make right decision.


SLEEP ARCHITECTURE & STAGING: Testing began at 10:28:28 PM and ended at 5:41:52 AM, for a total recording time (TRT) of 433.4 minutes. The sleep period lasted 431.0 minutes and the total sleep time (TST) was 412.5 minutes, which resulted in a sleep efficiency (TST÷TRT) of 95.2%. The sleep latency (SL) was 2.4 minutes, and the latency to the first occurrence of Stage R was 155.5 minutes. There were 3 Stage R periods observed on this study night, 13 awakenings (i.e. transitions to Stage W from any sleep stage), and 68 total stage transitions. Wake after sleep onset (WASO) time accounted for 18.5 minutes, while the time spent is each sleep stage was 97.5 minutes (Stage N1); 211.0 minutes (Stage N2); 51.0 minutes (Stage N3); and 53.0 minutes (Stage R). The percentage of Total Sleep Time in each stage was: 23.6% (Stage N1); 51.1% (Stage N2); 12.4% (Stage N3); and 12.8% (Stage R).

RESPIRATORY: The patient experienced 7 apneas in total. Of these, 0 were identified as obstructive apneas, 0 were mixed apneas, and 7 were central apneas. This resulted in an apnea index (AI) of 1.0 apneas/hour of sleep. The patient experienced 86 hypopneas in total, which resulted in a hypopnea index (HI) of 12.5 hypopneas/hr. The overall apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was 13.5 events/hr, while the AHI during Stage R sleep was 15.8/hr. AHI results by body-position showed: supine AHI = 20.8/hr; right-side AHI = 14.8/hr; left-side AHI = 5.1/hr; and prone AHI = N/A/hr.

For other respiratory disturbances, there were 0 occurrences of Cheyne Stokes breathing, and 0 respiratory effort-related arousals (RERAs). The RERA index was 0.0 events/hr, and the total respiratory disturbance index (RDI) was 13.5 events/hr.

OXIMETRY: Analysis of continuous oxygen saturations showed a mean SpO2 value of 94.9% throughout the study, with a minimum oxygen saturation during sleep of 85.0% and a mean value of 94.9% for the same period. Oxygen saturations were below ≤ 88% for 0.5 minutes of the time spent asleep. 

AROUSAL: The patient experienced 156 arousals in total, for an arousal index of 22.7 arousals/hour. Of these, 34 were identified as respiratory-related arousals (4.9/hr), 41 were PLM-related arousals (6.0/hr), and 81 were spontaneous (11.8/hr) --- the result of no identifying cause


I was trying to upload pics but there seem to be 200 KB limit.
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#16
Sleeprider
Have you considered asking for an auto machine and self-titration? It would save a night in a sleep clinic, net you a better machine, and get you going sooner. Most insurance allows it, the clinics and DMEs don't like it. You know your medical rights in terms of declining a test or requesting a different approach.


I didn't consider that seems I'm new to all of this. I will ask my doctor when I see him. Thanks for suggestion.
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#17
Looks like you were tolerant of the sleep study. You did not have a titration where you tried CPAP pressure. You have central apnea, and CPAP is very unlikely to improve your situation. For that reason, I think you should do a clinical titration study, and be aware that with CPAP those hypopnea events will likely turn into full-on centrals.

In my opinion, you are at very high risk of failing CPAP and requiring a bilevel ASV. So disregard my previous comment that it might be good to just go with an auto CPAP and self-titrate. Verify that the sleep clinic is prepared to progress through CPAP and BiPAP titrations and try ASV. You need to know what machine is going to work, not just that CPAP failed. The same test machine is used for all of these evaluations, so make sure the sleep clinic is prepared to go all the way so you don't repeat at additional cost.
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#18
In my sleep study, I got more sleep than I thought I had. I was just glad I had enough sleep for them to get their data.
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#19
(04-19-2017, 12:26 PM)Chicago Wrote: Hello All!

2 days ago I had a sleep study done at a facility because of my issues waking up in the morning and being super tired after waking up. Unfortunately I was not able to have good sleep because of the place being super loud. I woke up maybe 6 or 7 times and didn't sleep much during the study. Before the study I was told by a technician that if I go above 5 episodes he will come and put a mask on. That didn't happen. At the end of the study he suggested that I don't have a sleep apnea problem. I'm yet to see my study full result and talk to a specialist about the results. However, where it gets tricky is that my partner has a sleep apnea and uses ResMed autoset 10. His study (in home) showed 30 episodes an hour. With the machine he went to 0.7. He usually doesn't go over 1. I did try his machine 2 nights and both nights shows that the number of episodes was 7. That's where I have a question. How is that possible that my number is bigger than his if I don't have sleep apnea? Using my logic I assume that my number should be close to 0 and not bigger then without CPAP. Any idea? All suggestions welcomed.

the machine may not have the correct pressure for you

the machine may be triggering central apneas

you need to find a good sleep lab that will let you actually sleep
first do an in home test which is cheaper to prove you have apnea
two belt tests are replacing lab PSGs now

a one belt test should be adequate
although there is a range of things they measure dependign on the manufacturer

how do you feel later in the day
if your alarm is waking you up at the wrong time in the cycle you can feel super tired

try going to bed earlier andor  not using the alarm
how do you feel then
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#20
(04-24-2017, 05:14 PM)Hydrangea Wrote: In my sleep study, I got more sleep than I thought I had. I was just glad I had enough sleep for them to get their data.

I was shocked when I read my results. I had 13 awakenings and all of that in 20 min??? Cool Not sure about it. Yes I'm glad they got that data I hope I will be able to get to the bottom of this soon!.
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