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Benefits to higher pressures?
#11
I did an at home sleep study
Baseline O2 Saturation 93%
Average 89%
Lowest 82%The ODI is 10.4 (I need this explained please)
AHI 4.4

I have used my own O2 meter once since the test and after a couple nights ony and it was unchanged (more or less) from these numbers.
My blood pressure is, now that I look at it in table form, improved. My morning pressures are stable and have all be under 120/80, medicated whereas prior to this they could be bouncing about upto 130/85 (same dose)

I am pretty much doing all of this off my own back as the sleep folks that I first saw were unhelpful to say the least, but not, I might add, as bad as some folks here have relayed. They were for sure not interested in what I had to say or ask and were basically trying to figure out how to sell the machine to me before I even tried it. So I found another place, by chance that were very supportive but of course can do nothing until I can get my Doc to switch the referral across to them. They have even supplied me with a mask cushion to use on the machine I bought, no charge. I cannot get to the Doc for a while, and then I have to convince him to make the switch, which I guess will be OK.

PaytonA I have a Didgeredoo, brought back from Oz by a friend many years ago. Time to get out in the yard and upset the cattle I guess.
PoolQ Thanks, I will check this out.

Supersleeper My diagnosis was "Possible upper airways resistance Syndrome (no OSA, AHI =3/hr)
and "treatment options include lifestyle modification, an oral appliance or cpap
and also Sleep disorders other than OSA cannot be excluded.
So my next question is, what might these other disorders be and how do I find out?

I asked about the lifestyle changes and they told me to stop smoking, which I already told them I did in 1982 when I was 22.
They told me to exercise which I already mentioned to them I do

So my faith and trust in them started to wain at that point and I came here.

Beej, thanks for the tip, I will do this today.

The second sleep place told me to go back to the Doc (in addition to switching the referall) and insist on a pulmonary test and further at home sleep study, which they will do.
I am waiting for that appointment.
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#12
I noticed the comments on breathing exercises. I, too did not have OSA, but during my sleep, my SpO2 would drop below 80%, waking me. Normally, during awake time it runs 96-98%. The reason is that I have done Tai Chi and Aikido for years. Both teach "belly breathing," or diaphragmatic breathing. I have COPD, and learning this has kept me off oxygen for almost 20 years. When I slept, however, my breathing would become more shallow, causing drop in SpO2. The CPAP has helped tremendously, forcing me to breath better. (BTW, I am 73)

Just an observation, hope it helps.
Old man, new machine. Better sleep! Thanks
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#13
(03-29-2017, 08:48 AM)jsielke Wrote: I noticed the comments on breathing exercises. I, too did not have OSA, but during my sleep, my SpO2 would drop below 80%, waking me. Normally, during awake time it runs 96-98%. The reason is that I have done Tai Chi and Aikido for years. Both teach "belly breathing," or diaphragmatic breathing. I have COPD, and learning this has kept me off oxygen for almost 20 years. When I slept, however, my breathing would become more shallow, causing drop in SpO2. The CPAP has helped tremendously, forcing me to breath better.  (BTW, I am 73)

Just an observation, hope it helps.

It does help, thank you.
Mine, during awake time will be 95% or less, usually sitting at 91% and occasionally it will start at 96/97 if I just walked in the room and sat down, then it dips to settle and rarely going below 90% but when sleeping it will drop to (the lowest so far) 82%
If I take deep breaths, I can get it to 98% but have then seen it go to 88% and settle back to 91%
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#14
A higher EPAP pressure can improve oxygenation, and is a basic principle of ventilation, whether for CPAP or hospital ventilation PEEP: Abbreviation for positive end-expiratory pressure. Do a search and take a look at how EPAP pressure can be used to meet your SpO2 objectives.
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#15
(03-29-2017, 10:47 AM)Sleeprider Wrote: A higher EPAP pressure can improve oxygenation, and is a basic principle of ventilation, whether for CPAP or hospital ventilation  PEEP: Abbreviation for positive end-expiratory pressure.  Do a search and take a look at how EPAP pressure can be used to meet your SpO2 objectives.

How would I begin to set up the S9 for this?
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#16
Based on suggestions, am going to try upping APAP settings from 6-16.5 to 8-18. Let you know how it works.
Old man, new machine. Better sleep! Thanks
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#17
(03-29-2017, 11:42 AM)bexiesbruv Wrote:
(03-29-2017, 10:47 AM)Sleeprider Wrote: A higher EPAP pressure can improve oxygenation, and is a basic principle of ventilation, whether for CPAP or hospital ventilation  PEEP: Abbreviation for positive end-expiratory pressure.  Do a search and take a look at how EPAP pressure can be used to meet your SpO2 objectives.

How would I begin to set up the S9 for this?

The S9 refers to an entire array of models, your model is the S9 Autoset. You can't really raise or indeed adjust EPAP, the best you can do is crank up the EPR to its highest setting of 3. That's roughly equivalent to setting the EPAP at 3 below IPAP. When you set the range on your machine you are effectively setting the IPAP. You don't specify the pressure range in your profile, so I can't be more specific other than to muddle things up by telling you that regardless of the EPR setting your "EPAP" never falls below 4.

A machine will never lower the pressure below 4 because that's the minimum needed to keep the hose purged of exhaled air. We don't want to re-breathe our exhaled air.
Sleepster
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#18
pretty sure he wanted a higher exhale pressure, so setting EPR to 0 or off would give the most pressure possible, also pretty sure a CPAP cannot increase the exhale higher than the inhale pressure
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#19
Here is my Sleepyhead summary
To be honest, I dont know what I need to do with regards setup.
PEEP appears to be the way to go and how to do it, or as close a proximity I can get to be effective,  with the S9 Autoset EPR is what want to find out.
Its hard when you dont even know what questions to ask.


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   
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#20
(03-29-2017, 01:02 PM)Sleepster Wrote:
(03-29-2017, 11:42 AM)bexiesbruv Wrote:
(03-29-2017, 10:47 AM)Sleeprider Wrote: A higher EPAP pressure can improve oxygenation, and is a basic principle of ventilation, whether for CPAP or hospital ventilation  PEEP: Abbreviation for positive end-expiratory pressure.  Do a search and take a look at how EPAP pressure can be used to meet your SpO2 objectives.

How would I begin to set up the S9 for this?

The S9 refers to an entire array of models, your model is the S9 Autoset. You can't really raise or indeed adjust EPAP, the best you can do is crank up the EPR to its highest setting of 3. That's roughly equivalent to setting the EPAP at 3 below IPAP. When you set the range on your machine you are effectively setting the IPAP. You don't specify the pressure range in your profile, so I can't be more specific other than to muddle things up by telling you that regardless of the EPR setting your "EPAP" never falls below 4.

A machine will never lower the pressure below 4 because that's the minimum needed to keep the hose purged of exhaled air. We don't want to re-breathe our exhaled air.

To clarify what Sleepster wrote here, in an auto CPAP the pressure setting is IPAP and when EPR is used, the EPAP is the resulting expiratory pressure.  Using the principles of PEEP, if you have an objective of increasing oxygenation, the the alternatives are to use lower EPR settings (or off), or to use higher fixed pressure above your normal auto pressure, to maintain expiratory pressure.  Something interesting to note is that EPR lowers PEEP, while CFlex and AFlex do not affect PEEP as the pressure returns to IPAP before exhalation ends.

bexiesbruv, what are your pressure settings and EPR. The table you posted of pressure stats don't really show the information needed.  If you can show the daily detail graphs with events, flow, pressure, SpO2, flow limits, then I think we could find an answer.
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