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Bite Guard for Mouth Breathing
#1
Has anyone had success using a mouth guard to stop mouth breathing?

I've tried chin straps and cervical collars with no luck. Taping is working really well, but I would like to find something else that will work.

If you have had a mouth guard work for you please share what brand and any tips you might have.

Thanks
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#2
No one? Unsure
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#3
A mouth guard is usually prescribed by your dentist for the condition of grinding your teeth, which is called bruxism. I believe a mouth guard actually holds your teeth apart, so I'm not sure how a mouth/bite guard can help with mouth breathing.

I think your stuck with either a chin strap or learn the tongue suck method. I know you said you tried a chin strap already, but there are many different styles. The idea is to push your chin/jaw up instead of back.

Hang in there, I'm sure there will be other responses and ideas as mouth breathing is a problem for many folk here. Some have conquered it and some haven't.

OpalRose
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#4
(11-18-2016, 07:18 PM)OpalRose Wrote: A mouth guard is usually prescribed by your dentist for the condition of grinding your teeth, which is called bruxism.

I don't see the connection to mouth breathing, or see how a mouth/bite guard can help with that.

Keeps your mouth closed. There are kinds that are made to stop snoring and some advertise as helping mild OSA.
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#5
(11-18-2016, 07:23 PM)mcsheltie Wrote: Keeps your mouth closed. There are kinds that are made to stop snoring and some advertise as helping mild OSA.

Yes, some are advertised to treat mild OSA, like the Mandibular Device, but are not normally used in conjunction with cpap therapy. You can google and get information on the many types of mouth guards. Most of what I read on the various devices relates to snoring more so than mouth breathing. I copied some info for you:



There are several different types of snoring devices which work in different manners. The Tongue Stabilizing Devices (TSD) and Mandibular Advancing Devices (MAD), also called JAD or jaw advancing device.

Some Tongue Stabilizing Devices (TSD) work by sucking the tongue forward – essentially out of the mouth, or stabilizing the tongue out of the way . My moving the tongue forward, or downward, there is increase open space in the back of the throat. This decrease the amount of tissues that can vibrate in the back of the throat – basically reducing or eliminating snoring.

One of the benefits of the TSD compared to other snoring devices is that, generally, they do not cause jaw discomfort. They are less likely to cause TMJ or tooth shifting. For people who have dental issues or missing teeth, the TSD may be a more desirable option.

One of the complaints with TSD’s is that sometimes people feel uncomfortable with the position of the tongue. Also, there are several reports of increased salivation (more spit in the mouth).

Mandibular Advancing Devices (MAD) essentially work by moving the lower jaw forward which opens up the airway in the back of the throat. Like the TSD, MAD’s also move the tongue forward – along with the entire mandible.

The MAD’s used for treating sleep Apnea are similar to many of the simple snoring devices listed here. They move the jaw forward.

With the MAD in place, the jaw moves forward, the airway becomes larger, and there is less tissue in the flow of air. This yields less turbulence and less snoring.
One of the most common complaints with MAD snoring devices is teeth shifting and tooth discomfort

The TSD’s are often a ‘one size fits all’. There are few variables with TSD’s. They are ready to use out of the box.

The MAD and MAD-like devices may require extra fitting. Some MAD stop snoring devices can simply be place directly in the mouth and used.

Other, more advance snoring mouth guards, use a ‘boil and bite’ feature which allows for the personalization of the device.

These Boil and Bite devices allow for custom fitting with your mouth and teeth. Usually the devices are placed in boiling water for several seconds. After cooling the device for a few seconds, the snoring device is placed in the mouth. The user bites down on the moldable piece and pushes the soft plastic against the teeth.

Once cooled, these snore guards now fit the use, and only that user. That conform directly to the owners mouth.

Some of these dental devices can be refitted if the impression is not correct. By simply repeating the process, the device can be refit.

Many of these MAD’s are now adjustable for snoring efficacy. Like the professionally made Sleep Apnea oral appliances, some of the snoring mouthpieces can have protrusion of the lower part of the guard adjusted.

Some of these adjustable devices require a tool for adjustment. By turning an allen wrench, the mandibular part of the mouthpiece can move forward or backward. This can allow for fine tuning of device based on efficacy vs. comfort.
Generally, the more forward the lower part, the less comfortable, and the more effective.

Most of these devices are made of a thermoplastic. This like a rubbery plastic that has some pliability or flexibility. They feel and look like sports mouthguards. However, sport mouth guards and bruxism mouth devices to not usually move the jaw forward. They work in different ways.


OpalRose
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www.ApneaBoard.com

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INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.




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#6
I'm not interested in the tongue devices. I am trying to keep my mouth closed. Not have my tongue protruding out of it. Plus the reviews are not positive as far as comfort is concerned. Devices for bruxism often are only for the top teeth and obviously they would not hold your mouth shut. But several of the snoring devices once molded to the top and bottom teeth claim to do that. I have a small mouth. My dentist uses children's bitewings when I need xrays. So I need to be careful of the size. Several offered on Amazon are probably too big. I have to be able to close my mouth or it defeats the purpose!

Like I said, I am hoping someone on this forum has given these a try and could let me know if they worked for them or not. The good ones are in the $100 range.

Taping is working well. My leak rate is just a hair over the intentional rate. But I'd like another solution. Chin strap and cervical collar didn't work.
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#7
Found one called ZYPPAH. It has a tongue elastic. That along with the typical mouth guard is supposed to keep your tongue in place. I sent them an email asking a couple questions.
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#8
So i haven't tried a bite guard, or tongue thing, or any of the others, but I read the thread, and I think what they're trying to explain to you, and what has been explained in other threads is that if your're not using cpap some of these alternate devices might work, to some degree. However, when using them in conjunction with cpap therapy they generally interfere and become counterproductive. Again, I have no personal experience, just what I've read, and other members have said.

Now in my personal experience, I began cpap as a "diagnosed mouth breather for whom a nasal pillow mask would never work" as stated by my DME. After doing some reading and research it became apparent to me that anyone suffering from OSA is going to be diagnosed as a mouth breather. Why, you ask? Let's consider the logic, the human body is meant to breathe through the nose, it's how we're designed. When breathing through the nose, and no longer able to get air, the reflexive action is to open the mouth and gasp for air. So if you're not suffering from osa, and you're asleep, I come by and pinch off your nostrils, what happens? You open your mouth and breathe. I considered that a nasal mask treating osa would signal my body that I was receiving adequate air, and would allow me to keep my mouth closed, as there would be no need to open my mouth. For me, I was mostly correct.

But as they say, the devil is in the details. For one thing, it seems once you open your mouth it's pretty much game over. The machine continues to pump air through your nostrils and out the mouth and your body won't close your mouth again. So if you're running a wide open auto machine, and find yourself having an apnea, until you wake up and close your mouth it won't work again. I was able to resolve that by everyone here helping me get my settings right. Then there was the occasional roll over or restless nights sleep that somehow opened my mouth and messed me up. Not much I could do about that initially. I did try a chin strap, I didn't like it, and it lent toward a sore jaw in the morning. I just never liked it. Instead I continued with the nasal mask, a slight leak initially, a bunch of wake ups to close my mouth, and the more the therapy worked it seemed the more my body adjusted to just keeping my mouth closed. I found when I went to sleep I'd put my tongue up so the air couldn't get out and more and more it became second nature until eventually my body just took over and kept my mouth closed. These days (two years later) it isn't even a thought, I just put on the pillows, close my mouth and that's that.

Based on your leak rate being pretty much acceptable, and your machine compensating and handling the apneas I would suggest that you not try adding anything else in the mix just yet. Give your body a chance to get used to the fact that you now can breathe as you should, and see if it doesn't use it's own muscle memory to correct the issue. That's my two cents on the subject.
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#9
Thanks
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#10
So? How goes? Inquiring minds want to know Big Grin
If everyone thinks alike, then someone isn't thinking.
Everyone knows something, together we could know everything.
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