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Blood Pressure Question
#11
Good guess, Ghost - you would have an easy tell if you felt a little tingling in the legs, like it was going to sleep, or if the skin felt a little cold without you touching it. It sits in with a positional bp change. So the test would be do you get the same bp over around three minutes sitting, standing and lying prone. (the prone should be lower, anyway). Next, try your bp on different chairs. If you are consistently getting higher readings than when standing, you would be well advised to see a cardiologist, just to be sure, although in many cases this is a minor positional complaint and not life threatening. It could even be the result of over-taught buttock muscles impinging on blood flow to the leg, a problem seen in some athletes, dancers (retired, not active) and pilots. If you are on calcium blockers this should regularise.
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#12
Ghost1958,
You brought back memories of the 1970s and last time I remember seeing those MAST trousers. The ones I remember had large zippers on the outside seams so you could lay it out like a tarp and then put the victim on them and then zip up the trousers.

When I take the measurements I'm sitting on an office chair that I have used for 20 years both feet are firmly on the floor.

DrWils,
I'll try your idea of trying different chairs. My cardiologist and my PCP have written off a lot of my high blood pressure as having a "white coat" syndrome. I advised my cardiologist of the variances in my BP and was told I have orthostatic hypotension; "Don't worry about it unless I vapor lock."

Evidently, I'm placing too much concern on this matter.

Once again, thanks for the input.
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#13
MAST trousers are still in use, in a variation of the original, at least over here. There are still considered effective, but are only used in certain cases (Jaws of Life, that sort of thing).

I am unsure about white coat syndrome, but I would hazard a guess that once you have established in your mind that this will be the result, your body will respond thusly, so it is to be kept in mind. White coat syndrome is observed when in the presence of doctors (the heart beats faster, the bp elevates, or alternately, the symptoms disappear altogether.) What you may have is some sort of operant conditioning. Or you may just be a normal mess like most of us.
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#14
(11-24-2014, 05:35 PM)sgearhart Wrote: While recording AM and PM BP readings for my pulmonologist, I noticed an anomaly in my readings. Whenever I am physically active, standing or totally reclining my BP is 120/79 average, going as low as 105/72. When I sit my BP increases to an average of 150/100, up to 176/105. My PCP said he's never heard of such a thing. Aside from the joke, "Don't sit!"; I am interested in anybody's ideas.

Saw this info on medicinenet.com about postural hypotension:

Normally, properly taken BP measurements show only minor variations with changes in position. Certain patients with an imbalance of the autonomic nervous system (ANS), however, may tend to have a fall in BP with the upright position. The ANS normally controls constriction (narrowing) and dilation (widening) of blood vessels and so helps regulate a person's BP. Such a fall in BP with standing is called postural hypotension (low blood pressure), which, when significant, can cause weakness, lightheadedness, and even fainting. The treatment of high blood pressure (hypertension) with medications in these patients may actually lead to an excessive fall in BP with standing.
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