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CA
#1
I had 73 AHI during my sleep study, but CA ( I guess that means central apnea ) was 0. Now that my machine is set at pressure 10, I have about 10 or 11 AHI with about 9 of that CA. I this for real? Why would pressure make my CA worse. Also, why wouldn't my doctor order an automatically
adjusting machine ( the price is not much more ) instead of constant pressure?
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#2
Hi rgrxdp,
WELCOME! to the forum.!
Hang in there for more answers to your questions and best of luck with your CPAP therapy.
trish6hundred
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#3
Sorry, I was wrong...but, usually the DME will "rent" you the machine for the first month or so. Get with your doctor and upgrade fast!!
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#4
(10-13-2013, 05:43 PM)rgrxdp Wrote: I had 73 AHI during my sleep study, but CA ( I guess that means central apnea ) was 0. Now that my machine is set at pressure 10, I have about 10 or 11 AHI with about 9 of that CA. I this for real? Why would pressure make my CA worse. Also, why wouldn't my doctor order an automatically
adjusting machine ( the price is not much more ) instead of constant pressure?

That is a good question. In my experience, when I had my first sleep study, they wrote a script for the machine and sent it to my ordering doc to sign. After the sleep study, I said that I had been reading about machine types and I wanted one that the pressure could be changed and they refused to do this.

During my 2nd sleep study, everything that happened was blamed on REM sleep. The tech ignored my doctor's orders. She also told me that during my first sleep study, I was on my side the whole night and that is why my pressure setting was wrong b/c that tech did not have me lay on my back during the study. I will spare the rest of the details other than to say that if one is told that on CPAP therapy 95% of the sleep time the pressure is at 19.9%, why would they stop the pressure at 16%? Why would they ignore the orders that said if I reach 16% that they are supposed to switch me to BIPAP to see how that works? Obviously she ignored the doc's orders and was trying to find the correct pressure which was not necessary since I had an auto set. She was supposed to use BIPAP if I was at 16%. In my first sleep study, there was a graph and it showed they started me out at 4%, 5%, 6%, etc. and at 7-9% I had no AHI's but when I went to 10, 11% I had them again so they tried me at 12% and said my AHIs were in the acceptable range.

We have to be our own advocate as I have learned over the past 2 years. I agree with the other post.

This is why I went to my doc to tell him what was going on and ask if I needed another sleep study to see if I needed a different type of machine. Sleep studies are only as good as the tech and how well they listen to the patient.

I specifically asked for the data plots from my first sleep study and was told that it was and they were not. I know this b/c a tech at my doctor's office read the data plots to me and they were not included in my sleep study report that was emailed to me.

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#5
Unfortunately there is only one person that truly cares about your outcome in any medical issue or in life in general.
We each have to research our issues before and after any procedure, and before we accept any prescription.
Some time spent here and other sites arms us with the knowledge we need to be able to stand up for ourself and get what we need the first time. If we accept what the establishment offers us we often loose.
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#6
(10-13-2013, 09:56 PM)bwexler Wrote: Unfortunately there is only one person that truly cares about your outcome in any medical issue or in life in general.
We each have to research our issues before and after any procedure, and before we accept any prescription.
Some time spent here and other sites arms us with the knowledge we need to be able to stand up for ourself and get what we need the first time. If we accept what the establishment offers us we often loose.

This is so true, however, I tried hard to get something done b/c of the data on my auto set. If the tech doesn't do what the doctor ordered and what I asked for since my data shows my pressure at its limits, and the tech was trying to find an optimal pressure when that wasn't necessary with an autoset. what the doc told them to do was to switch me to bipap if my pressure was 16 and they did not do that. All I can do now is call the doctor's office in the morning and I fully intend to do just that. I also put in a call to the medical director, however, he is the one that I asked for the data plots and he said that was included in the sleep study records but it wasn't. My doctor has them but I don't. I do NOT like people that do NOT tell the truth. This is my life and my health and that is why I expect someone to do their job so I get the best treatment and not get other health issues b/c my treatment is not right!! Dont-knowHuh
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#7
To the original poster:

Yes, it happens and is quite common. I would not worry about it for right now. How long have you been using the machine?

If it has been more than a few weeks, let the doctor know. What he will probably do is drop the pressure down a few points and let you get used to that then raise it back to the treatment pressure.
PaulaO2
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#8
Thanks for the help everyone. Does anyone have a theory why CA increases with pressure while OA decreases?
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#9
Well, this is just off the top of my head with no data behind it at all, but with an increased airway pressure, it becomes physically easier to inhale. It might be that this tricks the brain into thinking that it doesn't have to try to breathe at all - it will be done for it by the CPAP machine. Then, eventually the brain learns that it does in fact have to continue breathing even with the increased airway pressure.

And, of course, with increased airway pressure, the "splint" effect keeping the soft tissues from obstructing the airway becomes stronger, thereby reducing obstructive apneas.
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#10
Ever stick your head out the window of a fast moving car? You get plenty of air, but you feel like you've lost your breath.

Same, only different.

Where is the delete button? LOL
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