Hello Guest, Welcome to Apnea Board !
As a guest, you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use.
To post a message, you must create a free account using a valid email address.

or Create an Account


New Posts   Today's Posts

[CPAP] Newbie - At-home sleep study option?
#1
Newbie here. Using ResMed S9 Elite with H5i humidifier and nasal pillows. I have bee using it for about 18 months now with no changes in pressure or use. I found the forum last night and looked over the methods for changing the pressure settings. I went from previous setting of 7 to 8 and monitored my sleep (Fitbit) for last night. Been using the Fitbit for this since late March and have always had red band 'awake' periods throughout the sleep cycle; until last night. There were light blue restless period bands, but not a single red band. Anecdotal, at best, but it's a start.

For what it is worth, I live and work in Germany and have found that the ENT doc here, in my opinion, is all about the money and has zero concern for treatment or care. Not easy to switch docs since most host nation docs speak very little English and I speak elementary school German which is not conducive to technical issues or medical care. So, this board was a godsend in that it empowers me to monitor and decide on changes after discussing with my GP doc.

Have downloaded SleepyHead and also requested the link for the ResScan download. I'm used to metrics in monitoring both blood sugar and blood pressure, so the learning curve should be short, but I certainly expect to have some questions.

As to the 'legality' of self-changed CPAP pressure, I've read a lot on the subject on this forum and others. The consensus seems to be 1) docs tout it as technically illegal per DME regs 2) users pretty much debunk it and use the CPAP and CPAP software and as an information source and resource for decision making. I chart my blood sugar and adjust my diet based on what I see over a period of time. I view this no differently and, frankly, get a bit of a laugh when I think of the armed response CPAP team coming to enforce a 'law' against me changing settings on a device I own. I've also read folks discussing insurance companies verifying usage, etc. I guess I've never heard of that being a valid 'thing' until I started reading forums. I've never had my insurance ever even hint at being an intrusive monitor on my healthcare and I cannot say in this forum what my response would be if they ever did.

I have a question: has anyone ever used an at-home sleep study option? I've only just heard about them and know nothing in depth at all about them. I ask because the two studies I have had were, hands down, the two most miserable nights I've ever had with regard to sleep. Fact is, they were so terrible, I refuse ever to get one again so long as I have an operative CPAP machine; ever. If, however, the at-home option is a valid data source for the docs and it is less cumbersome and/or allows 'unassisted' bathroom use, I'm in.

Look forward to using this forum to better educate myself and tailor my doctor-monitored treatment.

Cheers!
Post Reply Post Reply
#2
Welcome aboard Unsleep!
You have come to the right place for help.
Hang around and in no time at all your answers will come.
Good luck to you.
Sleep Tight...
Gabby
Post Reply Post Reply
#3
Hi unsleep,
WELCOME! to the forum.!
It's GREAT to hear that you have taken charge of your healthcare.
Hang in there for morre responses to your post and best of luck to you.
trish6hundred
Post Reply Post Reply


#4
(06-09-2014, 03:39 AM)unsleep Wrote: I have a question: has anyone ever used an at-home sleep study option?

1) Those are usually used for the PSG (the first sleep study to show if you have sleep apnea) but can be used for a titration (to see what pressure is correct for you).

2) You wouldn't need one since you already have the ability to find your own correct pressure (using software and making your own changes).

Post Reply Post Reply
#5
I used an at-home sleep study last month.
My pulmonary doc administered it.
It has a head band and nasal cannula attached.
Pretty simple to use from the directions provided.
Turned it in the next day and
they called me back a week or two later, "You have apnea AHI 22!"

So it confirmed what we already knew since I had been sleeping with an S9 for over a year already.

Hope this helps!

Cheers!
"With ordinary talent and extraordinary perseverance, all things are attainable." - Thomas Foxwell Buxton

Cool
Post Reply Post Reply
#6
(06-09-2014, 03:39 AM)unsleep Wrote: I went from previous setting of 7 to 8 and monitored my sleep (Fitbit) for last night. Been using the Fitbit for this since late March and have always had red band 'awake' periods throughout the sleep cycle; until last night.

Hi unsleep, welcome to the site.... I don't think Fitbit's "sleep" stuff is a really great indication of how your apnea is doing, but it is fun to use it. Today I had a rather busy day in Portland, and in spite of lots of effort, my Fitbit told me I had only walked 609 steps! But then, in fairness, I did leave it in my jammie pants this morning so it didn't actually make the trip to Portland with me.

(06-09-2014, 03:39 AM)unsleep Wrote: Have downloaded SleepyHead and also requested the link for the ResScan download. I'm used to metrics in monitoring both blood sugar and blood pressure, so the learning curve should be short, but I certainly expect to have some questions.

You're on a pretty low pressure, so it will be interesting to see what your ahi is once you start using Sleepyhead or Rescan.

(06-09-2014, 03:39 AM)unsleep Wrote: As to the 'legality' of self-changed CPAP pressure, I've read a lot on the subject on this forum and others. The consensus seems to be 1) docs tout it as technically illegal per DME regs 2) users pretty much debunk it and use the CPAP and CPAP software and as an information source and resource for decision making. I chart my blood sugar and adjust my diet based on what I see over a period of time. I view this no differently and, frankly, get a bit of a laugh when I think of the armed response CPAP team coming to enforce a 'law' against me changing settings on a device I own. I've also read folks discussing insurance companies verifying usage, etc. I guess I've never heard of that being a valid 'thing' until I started reading forums. I've never had my insurance ever even hint at being an intrusive monitor on my healthcare and I cannot say in this forum what my response would be if they ever did.
Funny you should mention it. Just today the Cpap Police came and accused me of changing the settings on my machine. I told them I didn't do it, it was the miserable cats setting me up. They seemed to buy that and left here to go to Texas to discuss something with some guy named Herb.
Post Reply Post Reply


#7
(06-09-2014, 08:02 PM)retired_guy Wrote:
(06-09-2014, 03:39 AM)unsleep Wrote: I went from previous setting of 7 to 8 and monitored my sleep (Fitbit) for last night. Been using the Fitbit for this since late March and have always had red band 'awake' periods throughout the sleep cycle; until last night.

Hi unsleep, welcome to the site.... I don't think Fitbit's "sleep" stuff is a really great indication of how your apnea is doing, but it is fun to use it. Today I had a rather busy day in Portland, and in spite of lots of effort, my Fitbit told me I had only walked 609 steps! But then, in fairness, I did leave it in my jammie pants this morning so it didn't actually make the trip to Portland with me.

I agree. It's kind of akin to cutting paper with a chain saw as far as accuracy, I would think. It is just an indicator that I am drawing anecdotal conclusions from. Last night was the second night of the new pressure setting and, for the second time in a row, I had no 'awake' periods reported. I have no recollection of stirring either. For me, that is monumental (my nickname is, after all "unsleep"). If, and I underscore 'if', the data are accurate, this is indeed new, uncharted territory for me!!

(06-09-2014, 03:39 AM)unsleep Wrote: Have downloaded SleepyHead and also requested the link for the ResScan download. I'm used to metrics in monitoring both blood sugar and blood pressure, so the learning curve should be short, but I certainly expect to have some questions.

You're on a pretty low pressure, so it will be interesting to see what your ahi is once you start using Sleepyhead or Rescan.

I reviewed 160 days worth of data and the AHI was 0.63 (if I'm reading the right data point?). Still learning.

(06-09-2014, 03:39 AM)unsleep Wrote: As to the 'legality' of self-changed CPAP pressure, I've read a lot on the subject on this forum and others. The consensus seems to be 1) docs tout it as technically illegal per DME regs 2) users pretty much debunk it and use the CPAP and CPAP software and as an information source and resource for decision making. I chart my blood sugar and adjust my diet based on what I see over a period of time. I view this no differently and, frankly, get a bit of a laugh when I think of the armed response CPAP team coming to enforce a 'law' against me changing settings on a device I own. I've also read folks discussing insurance companies verifying usage, etc. I guess I've never heard of that being a valid 'thing' until I started reading forums. I've never had my insurance ever even hint at being an intrusive monitor on my healthcare and I cannot say in this forum what my response would be if they ever did.
Funny you should mention it. Just today the Cpap Police came and accused me of changing the settings on my machine. I told them I didn't do it, it was the miserable cats setting me up. They seemed to buy that and left here to go to Texas to discuss something with some guy named Herb.

No, they came here to Germany. That certainly explains a lot! Wink

Thanks for the reply and the humor!

Post Reply Post Reply
#8
(06-09-2014, 04:01 PM)Shastzi Wrote: I used an at-home sleep study last month.
My pulmonary doc administered it.
It has a head band and nasal cannula attached.
Pretty simple to use from the directions provided.
Turned it in the next day and
they called me back a week or two later, "You have apnea AHI 22!"

So it confirmed what we already knew since I had been sleeping with an S9 for over a year already.

Hope this helps!

Cheers!

Thanks, that does help. Still finding my way around the software, but have seen a marked two day improvement with the pressure adjustment. And, with an AHI of 23 to start, it has gone to 0.7 at 7hpa to 0.4 at 8hpa.
Post Reply Post Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  DME giving me a titration study and a FFM (not charging) JT01 7 118 Yesterday, 12:24 PM
Last Post: personal111
  Sleep Study Results HELP Please! sleepydwarf2014 12 361 06-23-2017, 12:19 PM
Last Post: Marillion
  Have you had second sleep study for titration Novello1234 10 239 06-21-2017, 10:47 AM
Last Post: Marillion
  Help interpreting sleep study ihatesleepapnea2017 3 124 06-21-2017, 10:33 AM
Last Post: TASmart
  how to increase AHI during sleep study MeTheInvincible 11 446 06-09-2017, 05:31 PM
Last Post: quiescence at last
  Currents thought about titration study BrassCat 1 162 06-08-2017, 09:53 PM
Last Post: PaulaO2
  Sleep study and weight Novello1234 1 221 06-08-2017, 09:45 PM
Last Post: PaulaO2

Forum Jump:

New Posts   Today's Posts




About Apnea Board

Apnea Board is an educational web site designed to empower Sleep Apnea patients.

For any more information, please use our contact form.