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CPAP - Physical and Psychological Dependance
#1
CPAP - Physical and Psychological Dependance
Ok, after my sleep studies (AHI 10.6), the doctor ordered weight loss without CPAP. But based on the advice I received on this forum over my wakings and associated anxiety, i started CPAP therapy. 

I am now 168cm and 115 KGs, 38 years, male. I have started on a weight loss/exercise program.

I am wondering, does habitual use of CPAP contribute to greater dependence? I am thinking maybe the ease of breathing with a CPAP machine changes physiology in such a way that tissue and muscle in the throat weakens over time making normal breathing without CPAP more difficult.

The reason I am asking is that i am trying to lose weight to get rid of my machine.

I am aware that OSA can and does occur in people who have normal BMI, and for some this is the sad reality, but I am hoping against hope that weight-loss will allow me to free myself from the mask.
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#2
RE: CPAP - Physical and Psychological Dependance
If people became dependent on CPAP like a drug than you'd see people using their machines 24 hours a day. Oh course this doesn't happen.

Your safe.
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#3
RE: CPAP - Physical and Psychological Dependance
(10-14-2017, 02:52 PM)Walla Walla Wrote: If people became dependent on CPAP like a drug than you'd see people using their machines 24 hours a day. Oh course this doesn't happen.

Your safe.

Well I was only worried about dependence during sleep. Maybe dependence is not the right word. You lose muscles you dont exercise. Isnt it likely that the muscle that keeps your throat flap from collapsing weakens because CPAP does all the work. I know this is probably crazy and I am jumping to conclusions. A little knowledge is truly dangerous.
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#4
RE: CPAP - Physical and Psychological Dependance
(10-14-2017, 03:38 PM)taha Wrote:
(10-14-2017, 02:52 PM)Walla Walla Wrote: If people became dependent on CPAP like a drug than you'd see people using their machines 24 hours a day. Oh course this doesn't happen.

Your safe.

Well I was only worried about dependence during sleep. Maybe dependence is not the right word. You lose muscles you dont exercise. Isnt it likely that the muscle that keeps your throat flap from collapsing weakens because CPAP does all the work. I know this is probably crazy and I am jumping to conclusions. A little knowledge is truly dangerous.
CPAP doesn’t “do all the work”. You do.

There are so many factors that go into breathing and sleeping events, there’s no telling what the outcome of losing weight might be for you.  And then, there’s the minor —cough, cough—matter of getting older and things not working like they did before.....

Also, you might find that CPAP settles your breathing a bit and thereby helps with anxiety.  IMO This would be way more healthy than pharmaceuticals.
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#5
RE: CPAP - Physical and Psychological Dependance
The whole point of CPAP is to open your airway because your throat is unable to remain clear by its self when you sleep. Any throat muscles used are exercised during the day. The problem is they relax while your asleep.
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Membership in the Advisory Members group does not imply medical expertise or qualification for advising Sleep Apnea patients concerning their treatment.



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#6
RE: CPAP - Physical and Psychological Dependance
There are claims from speech pathologists that their clients (coincidentally) have helped their sleep apnea after doing certain exercises. I don't know if that is true or not. My daughter is taking up the didgeridoo, as that is said to exercise the muscles that improve sleep apnea (and there is supposed to be an actual study in support of this statement).

If you are concerned about weakening muscles, perhaps try exercises to counter it? It couldn't hurt.
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#7
RE: CPAP - Physical and Psychological Dependance
(10-14-2017, 05:19 PM)kiwii Wrote: There are claims from speech pathologists that their clients (coincidentally) have helped their sleep apnea after doing certain exercises. I don't know if that is true or not. My daughter is taking up the didgeridoo, as that is said to exercise the muscles that improve sleep apnea (and there is supposed to be an actual study in support of this statement).

If you are concerned about weakening muscles, perhaps try exercises to counter it? It couldn't hurt.

Laugh-a-lot Didgeridoo? Hurts my ears.......
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#8
RE: CPAP - Physical and Psychological Dependance
(10-14-2017, 06:13 PM)HalfAsleep Wrote: Laugh-a-lot Didgeridoo? Hurts my ears.......

I'm thinking of voice lessons. I love to sing, but, um, it's not something anyone would want to hear. Cool
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#9
RE: CPAP - Physical and Psychological Dependance
(10-14-2017, 09:06 PM)kiwii Wrote:
(10-14-2017, 06:13 PM)HalfAsleep Wrote: Laugh-a-lot Didgeridoo? Hurts my ears.......

I'm thinking of voice lessons. I love to sing, but, um, it's not something anyone would want to hear. Cool

Maybe the vocalizations on your SleepyHead charts aren't snores but operatic tremolo?  Oh-jeez


----------------

Sorry, Taha, I've taken your thread off course.

I was going to suggest to you a whole 'nother way to think of your CPAP, one that has nothing especially to do with sleep. It has to do with anxiety, which you often mention in conjunction with sleep. And this has nothing to do with the physiognomy of the throat or unwelcome dependence.

I found out by accident—because I was trying to learn how my new machine worked—that if I sat with it for 10 minutes or so at a low pressure, it relieved anxiety. I think this is because it somehow prompts you to deepen and slow your breath, and breathe assertively, exactly what is required in lowering anxiety. It's like getting an oxygen boost into your system, no oxygen hook up needed.
The CPAP, then, would be a tool to help with anxiety and not just sleep. IMO, Far better to be dependent on something that supports your living breath than to be dependent on a pharmaceutical (though I believe in those, too) that can be dangerously habit forming or have awful side-effects. Anyway, I thought you might like to give it a try.

I'm guessing this technique would be happier with the nasal pillows and not the FFM.

Maybe some other folks have had this experience, too.
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#10
RE: CPAP - Physical and Psychological Dependance
(10-14-2017, 09:30 PM)HalfAsleep Wrote:
(10-14-2017, 09:06 PM)kiwii Wrote:
(10-14-2017, 06:13 PM)HalfAsleep Wrote: Laugh-a-lot Didgeridoo? Hurts my ears.......

I'm thinking of voice lessons. I love to sing, but, um, it's not something anyone would want to hear. Cool

Maybe the vocalizations on your SleepyHead charts aren't snores but operatic tremolo?  Oh-jeez


----------------

Sorry, Taha, I've taken your thread off course.

I was going to suggest to you a whole 'nother way to think of your CPAP, one that has nothing especially to do with sleep. It has to do with anxiety, which you often mention in conjunction with sleep. And this has nothing to do with the physiognomy of the throat or unwelcome dependence.

I found out by accident—because I was trying to learn how my new machine worked—that if I sat with it for 10 minutes or so at a low pressure, it relieved anxiety. I think this is because it somehow prompts you to deepen and slow your breath, and breathe assertively, exactly what is required in lowering anxiety. It's like getting an oxygen boost into your system, no oxygen hook up needed.
The CPAP, then, would be a tool to help with anxiety and not just sleep. IMO, Far better to be dependent on something that supports your living breath than to be dependent on a pharmaceutical (though I believe in those, too) that can be dangerously habit forming or have awful side-effects. Anyway, I thought you might like to give it a try.

I'm guessing this technique would be happier with the nasal pillows and not the FFM.

Maybe some other folks have had this experience, too.

What an interesting idea. Yes I believe I'll try that. Meditate with the machine on at low pressure for 10 to 15 minutes. I think the rhythmic breathing and whooshing sound could be therapeutic. 

Not gonna try the didgeridoo or singing just yet. I want to keep living in this neighbourhood. ?
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