Hello Guest, Welcome to Apnea Board !
As a guest, you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use.
To post a message, you must create a free account using a valid email address.

or Create an Account


New Posts   Today's Posts

[CPAP] Success Story
#1
Thumbsup 
Six months ago, I began to realize that something was wrong with me. I would fall asleep at my computer, and nod off while driving. Very scary.

I was somewhat familiar with the term "sleep apnea", but I never considered it belonged to me. After all, I am a 73 year old retired engineer, whose goal was to just enjoy my retirement after a lifetime of work, and all of a sudden I was falling asleep at the oddest of times. I had developed the need to take an afternoon nap, a practice that I enjoyed immensely. After all, I am retired!

Just by luck, my doctor was also a sleep doctor. He suggested that I take a home sleep study, using a Watch-PAT digital device. I agreed, and actually enjoyed using this high tech device, as it was similar to digital designs I had worked on before my retirement.

At first, the results of the Watch-PAT home sleep study were shocking to me, since they were consistent with a patient with severe sleep apnea. But when I realized that this diagnosis corresponded correctly with my symptoms, and that it was treatable, I began to relax a bit. After all, it was not cancer, or some other horrible illness.

Let's skip to the good part. I've been using a ResMed S9 AutoSet for 40 days. (A fine piece of equipment, by the way.) CPAP, or even ACAP, is not easy to enjoy, but it does work miracles. I download the data each morning and make changes when necessary. My afternoon naps are a thing of the past, as are my falling asleep at my computer or while driving. I have a collection of different masks and I'm constantly learning how to live being a "hosehead". BUT, I have more energy, I'm not worried about driving a car, and I haven't snored in two months! Happiness!
Post Reply Post Reply
#2
Hi SKahnUSD,
WELCOME! to the forum.!
That's a great story, now you can REALLY enjoy retirement sleeping MUCH better.
Hang in there for more responses to your post.
CONTINUED SUCCESS.!
trish6hundred
Post Reply Post Reply
#3
Nice story, best of luck
You might want add your story in this thread
http://www.apneaboard.com/forums/Thread-...-Post-Here
Post Reply Post Reply


#4
Congrats. I had a similar experience and somehow managed to adapt in about a week.
It would be interesting to do a survey of people who adjust and people who don't. What aspects or lifestyle issues affect the success of getting used to a plastic spider on your face as you try and fall asleep? I remember reading a statistic somewhere that only 26% stay with it. When I mentioned this to my doctor he just brushed it aside and when I talked about the problems of some of the members of this board, he just said you were all "malcontents" (Of course I didn't buy that!) It's very complicated, I know. I wonder about factors like weight (obviously), drinking, drugs, time of night, eating at night, position, etc. It would be interesting to know what makes it successful.
Post Reply Post Reply
#5
Hi, SkahnUSD,
What a great story of success! Bet you have a happier and longer "retired" (not re-tired, repeatedly) life ahead of you.
Enjoy your healthier life!
Post Reply Post Reply
#6
After all these years, I actually look forward to using my dream machine. Other than the usual mask trials and battles, my years of untreated OSA are in my past, and my CPAP is very important to me.
*I* am not a DOCTOR or any type of Health Care Professional.  My thoughts/suggestions/ideas are strictly only my opinions.

"Only two defining forces have ever offered to die for you. Jesus Christ and the American Soldier. One died for your Soul, the other for your Freedom."
Post Reply Post Reply


#7
(05-08-2014, 01:41 PM)SKahnUSD Wrote: Six months ago, I began to realize that something was wrong with me. I would fall asleep at my computer, and nod off while driving. Very scary.

I was somewhat familiar with the term "sleep apnea", but I never considered it belonged to me. After all, I am a 73 year old retired engineer, whose goal was to just enjoy my retirement after a lifetime of work, and all of a sudden I was falling asleep at the oddest of times. I had developed the need to take an afternoon nap, a practice that I enjoyed immensely. After all, I am retired!

Just by luck, my doctor was also a sleep doctor. He suggested that I take a home sleep study, using a Watch-PAT digital device. I agreed, and actually enjoyed using this high tech device, as it was similar to digital designs I had worked on before my retirement.

At first, the results of the Watch-PAT home sleep study were shocking to me, since they were consistent with a patient with severe sleep apnea. But when I realized that this diagnosis corresponded correctly with my symptoms, and that it was treatable, I began to relax a bit. After all, it was not cancer, or some other horrible illness.

Let's skip to the good part. I've been using a ResMed S9 AutoSet for 40 days. (A fine piece of equipment, by the way.) CPAP, or even ACAP, is not easy to enjoy, but it does work miracles. I download the data each morning and make changes when necessary. My afternoon naps are a thing of the past, as are my falling asleep at my computer or while driving. I have a collection of different masks and I'm constantly learning how to live being a "hosehead". BUT, I have more energy, I'm not worried about driving a car, and I haven't snored in two months! Happiness!

Yes.......... I can so relate to your experience. Except for the 73 part. I'm a spry 71. But the falling asleep part? I live 2 1/2 miles away from our post office. (that's 1 1/4 plethora for your kilo guys) I had a hard time staying awake --- sometimes I didn't stay awake on the drive to or from the post office. I was a danger to myself and others on the road. I even knew it, and I had an agreement with my wife that if I were to pull over because I felt I couldn't stay awake she would simply take over. The problem is that being impaired from driving while dozing off is not all that much difference than any other impairment. The purp, or victim, or whatever loses the ability to make rational decisions. So I never pulled over, I just fought through it.

Isn't it nice now to be able to take a road-trip without being concerned that you could end up in a major accident?

For me, that's the best thing..... That and the no-snoring thing..... and the fact that my mask scares the crap out of the miserable cats.

Good job adapting to your new lifestyle!


Post Reply Post Reply
#8
(05-08-2014, 03:16 PM)sjssf Wrote: I remember reading a statistic somewhere that only 26% stay with it.

I would guess the percentage of dropouts would be pretty high. My sleep lab told me their grads had about 60% success rate. That seemed high to me at the time.

In my opinion the ones that have the best chance for success are those who care enough to dig up information to help them in this new lifestyle. That's why this website is so valuable. Far from being a bunch of malcontents, the people on this website are taking every step they can to make their life better. Each and every one of them (us) deserves a pat on our backs for giving a shix enough about our health to take the personal responsibility for making it better.

And two pats on the back to the owners and admins of this joint for doing nothing short of saving lives. That's how valuable their work is.
Post Reply Post Reply
#9
(05-09-2014, 05:58 PM)retired_guy Wrote:
(05-08-2014, 03:16 PM)sjssf Wrote: I remember reading a statistic somewhere that only 26% stay with it.

I would guess the percentage of dropouts would be pretty high. My sleep lab told me their grads had about 60% success rate. That seemed high to me at the time.

In my opinion the ones that have the best chance for success are those who care enough to dig up information to help them in this new lifestyle. That's why this website is so valuable. Far from being a bunch of malcontents, the people on this website are taking every step they can to make their life better. Each and every one of them (us) deserves a pat on our backs for giving a shix enough about our health to take the personal responsibility for making it better.

And two pats on the back to the owners and admins of this joint for doing nothing short of saving lives. That's how valuable their work is.

Amen!
The days of Dr Welby solving all our problems are over, if they ever existed. Now we have to be our own advocates and take responsibility for our selves.
My insurance wouldn't pay for any CPAP machinery so there was no way I was going to spend all that money and not know what I was getting into.
THIS BOARD IS GREAT! I thank you all for your stories and advice.

Post Reply Post Reply




Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Do NOT trust your DME - my story CZOscar 51 1,338 9 hours ago
Last Post: SarcasticDave94
Arrow Your Personal CPAP Success Story - Post Here SuperSleeper 833 244,435 10-11-2017, 03:01 PM
Last Post: NoDozer
  DME story nicholb 12 568 08-17-2017, 03:22 PM
Last Post: mogulman
  Is AHI the best indicator of success? DannyG 5 677 08-09-2017, 08:42 PM
Last Post: KenHylton
  Dreamstation Auto Noise Success? Surfbear 2 383 06-15-2017, 08:00 AM
Last Post: Surfbear
Information New to Apnea? Helpful tips to ensure success SuperSleeper 0 2,426 06-07-2017, 10:39 PM
Last Post: SuperSleeper
  My story, NOTE, a VERY VERY long story BiLevel48 3 464 03-27-2017, 07:23 PM
Last Post: trish6hundred

Forum Jump:

New Posts   Today's Posts




About Apnea Board

Apnea Board is an educational web site designed to empower Sleep Apnea patients.

For any more information, please use our contact form.