Hello Guest, Welcome to Apnea Board !
As a guest, you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use.
To post a message, you must create a free account using a valid email address.

or Create an Account


New Posts   Today's Posts

CPAP for snoring
#1
I had a friend ask me today if I knew if they prescribed CPAP for snoring only and no apnea. He had a sleep study done and it found no apnea but he was being awakened by his own snoring. I told him I had no idea but figured maybe someone here would know. They gave him a mouth appliance to wear to try to correct the problem but after just a few days he has stopped using it as he is getting severe pain in his upper jaw (probably TMJ)

Thanks
Post Reply Post Reply
#2
They probably would not. But snoring is a problem of either soft pallet restriction or nasal restriction. So an exam looking to see where the obstruction is, or why, would seem to be in order.
Post Reply Post Reply
#3
In my opinion, if snoring is severe than ought be treated with CPAP

From ResMed: What causes snoring?
[Image: xwhat-is-sleep-apnea.png.pagespeed.ic.T_At7ddcvr.png]

If you’ve been told you snore, chances are you already know you aren’t getting the type of quality sleep you need. When we’re asleep, the muscles in our necks relax. Sometimes, they relax so much that the upper airway (the nose and throat) partly closes, becoming too narrow for enough air to travel through to our lungs. This could be caused by temporary reasons, such as swollen tonsils or excess weight around the neck, or structural reasons, such as the shape of your nose or jaw. This narrowing of your airway causes a vibration in the throat, which causes the sound of snoring.

How snoring impacts you and your partner

Snoring not only disturbs your partner’s sleep, it also disrupts the sleep you’re getting, whether you realize it or not. Snoring means you’re not getting the right amount of oxygen into your system for your body to perform its important functions. It also means you’re likely waking up throughout the night without realizing it. That could be getting in the way of the healthy sleep you need to lead a refreshed, energetic life
Post Reply Post Reply


#4
From: In conversation with Professor Colin Sullivan; Snoring kills
http://www.apneaboard.com/forums/Thread-...ring-kills

Robyn Williams: Well let me ask you about the question of snoring, because lots of people snore but not necessarily all of them have apnoea, the stopping of breathing. Are many people just more or less safe snorers?

Colin Sullivan: I think that's a fair comment, yes there are, but snoring is graded from very mild to quite severe to obstructive and we don't know really where the threshold is. Although we do know that once you start snoring, snoring tends to progress-we understand why it progresses too because snoring actually damages the tissue. But we unequivocally know that once you have sleep apnoea that it is a major risk factor. It is actually a cause-what we now know is it causes high blood pressure, it causes heart attack, it causes stroke, and there is very clear evidence it itself is a causative mechanism in the underlying disease that leads to those, that's the vessel disease, atherosclerosis.

But when we come back down the severity, so for instance if you are a heavy snorer and people are commenting on it it's very likely you are going to have numbers of apnoeas-it might be 7 or 8 in the whole night-when you come back down the scale of severity we don't really know where the line is that puts you at risk. However, it is very clear that snoring gets worse with age. There are big epidemiological studies now that do link the history of snoring and outcomes and if you have a history of long snoring you're much more likely to have a stroke, heart attack, etc. But those epidemiological studies show the link, they don't actually show the individual, if you as an individual are snoring a little bit, what is your level of risk. In the mild end the answer is I don't know.

Post Reply Post Reply
#5
Thanks

He asked me because my wife and his wife are friends,,,and well you know how that conversation got started with me and my son on pap therapy and the success we have had with it. i have a bad feeling if his doctor jerks him around he and his wife are heading for trouble as they already are sleeping in different rooms. i am trying to get him hooked up with my doctor but that Jaguar driving bastard is booked solid for eight months.....geesh
Post Reply Post Reply
#6
and yet, unless you have a diagnosis demonstrating an AHI of 5 or better, they are just not going to prescribe cpap. Maybe your friend would elect to undertake it on his own, but the insurance company is not going to pay for it and the docs (right or wrong) are not going to prescribe.

However, a good ENT doc might find the problem and be able to recommend a solution, possibly even a cpap solution regardless of the AHI.
Post Reply Post Reply


#7
(07-29-2014, 04:32 PM)brianwood619 Wrote: I had a friend ask me today if I knew if they prescribed CPAP for snoring only and no apnea. He had a sleep study done and it found no apnea but he was being awakened by his own snoring. I told him I had no idea but figured maybe someone here would know. They gave him a mouth appliance to wear to try to correct the problem but after just a few days he has stopped using it as he is getting severe pain in his upper jaw (probably TMJ)

Any doctor can prescribe a CPAP machine, but they typically want you to have a sleep study in a lab first (even though I'm not a fan, myself)

While CPAP for snoring might or might not get covered by his insurance company, a good doc can usually come up with enough "bullet points" to get it through. In any case, if he needs one he should get one.

Even if it isn't covered, if he can get a prescription, he can buy an excellent machine online for less than $900, which is a bargain in exchange for feeling great in the morning, and not dying from a heat attack in the middle of the night.

"What the insurance company will cover" is not always the same thing as "What is medically necessary or beneficial"


Post Reply Post Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Snoring aquanaut20 12 414 03-15-2017, 04:43 PM
Last Post: aquanaut20
  Still snoring. Any thoughts? lisamcrn 6 313 02-25-2017, 11:08 AM
Last Post: pupcamper
  Snoring even with cpap Swiles 8 502 01-26-2017, 06:58 AM
Last Post: DeepBreathing
Question Snoring and Chasing Pressure chill 32 1,887 09-02-2016, 07:26 PM
Last Post: chill
  snoring has increased what is wrong? irenek2013 7 575 08-15-2016, 11:10 PM
Last Post: irenek2013
  Did you stop snoring? imanonymous 16 1,159 08-14-2016, 05:11 PM
Last Post: Apneaway
  [Health] Nasal snoring/apnea, please help! snooze 8 743 06-29-2016, 05:32 PM
Last Post: BadGoodDeb

Forum Jump:

New Posts   Today's Posts




About Apnea Board

Apnea Board is an educational web site designed to empower Sleep Apnea patients.

For any more information, please use our contact form.