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CPAP induced loss of balance / ataxia
#11
(08-23-2012, 04:53 PM)jeanette Wrote: You mention you have blocked sinuses etc but that does not seem to worry you, that is my main problem with the nasal pillows, not the face mask, does anyone have this symptom? mine is severe.


Odd, blocked sinuses is one big reason I plumped for nasal pillows. The direct forced humidified air helped to ease this problem.
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#12
An oral mask like the oracle will not inflate your ears once you learn how to use it. They can be tough to use, though. Especially due to dryness and having the oral interface in your mouth.

There is a valve at the back of your nose. Imaging blowing up a balloon. You don't have to pinch your nostrils shut, but no air comes out of your nose despite pressure in your mouth. This is the way you use an oral mask.

When I tried one, I would put it on, and act like I was trying to blow air back into the machine. I would get the feel of how the back of my nose felt, and then try to relax my throat. The pressure in my mouth would tend to hold the valve/flap at the back of the nose closed.

It's hard to describe, but becomes somewhat automatic after a while. They supply some nose plugs for "training," but you want to learn how to do it without the plugs.

When you do this right, there is no air pressure in your nose, or in your ears.

While I was able to stay sealed with the oral mask, I never got the hang of sleeping with it. The feeling was just too odd, and it dried my throat and mouth out a lot. There was also some discomfort and strange situation due to there being no airflow in my nose.

I was just experimenting with it, so I went back to my nasal mask.

An oral mask could be a lifesaver for people with certain nose/ear/eye problems.
Get the free SleepyHead software here.
Useful links.
Click here for information on the main alternative to CPAP.
If it's midnight and a DME tells you it's dark outside, go and check it yourself.
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#13
(08-24-2012, 10:04 PM)archangle Wrote: An oral mask could be a lifesaver for people with certain nose/ear/eye problems.

Thanks for the advice. However I would of thought that air being blown into the mouth will ultimately have the same effect as air blown into the nose? Isnt it all ultimately going into the same areas? Nevertheless, I may give this a try, thanks.

I have of course also considered a dental device. I had one made by a local dentist but it didnt fit properly and was very difficult to sleep with (it was a fixed device). The somnomed seems to have the top and bottom half separated, so may be easier to sleep with.

Have you read about the oral vacuum device that was launched recently? An oral device connects to a machine which produces a vacuum in the mouth and keeps the airway open. I am not sure its commercially available yet.
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#14
(08-25-2012, 04:43 AM)SeaPap Wrote: Thanks for the advice. However I would of thought that air being blown into the mouth will ultimately have the same effect as air blown into the nose? Isnt it all ultimately going into the same areas? Nevertheless, I may give this a try, thanks.

No. When an oral mask is properly used, you will not have nose plugs or anything else keeping pressure in your nose. You will have pressure in your mouth, throat, and lungs. The "valve" at the back of your nose will close and there will be no pressure in your nose.

That's assuming you can learn to keep the valve closed in your sleep and lot let all the air out your nose without plugging your nose.

The Eustachian tube that connects your inner ear to your "throat" comes out into the area of your airway that will not be pressurized with an oral mask.

Try blowing into your mouth like you're blowing up a balloon, but keeping your lips closed. No air will come out your nose because of the valve at the back of your nose. You won't feel any pressure in your ears because there's no pressure in your nose.

Now try the same thing pinching your nose shut and blowing into your nose. Your ears will pop.

Does anyone know the medical term for this "valve." It's basically the back end of your soft palate.
Get the free SleepyHead software here.
Useful links.
Click here for information on the main alternative to CPAP.
If it's midnight and a DME tells you it's dark outside, go and check it yourself.
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