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CPAP or APAP
#1
So, had sleep study and I have been diagnosed with mild sleep apnea. I was told I needed titration study, but insurance company says I do not. Dr's office is willing to write script for me to get my machine, so do I get APAP or CPAP? I'm thinking APAP since I have no idea what settings I need.

Any suggestions or advice is greatly appreciated.
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#2
I would think APAP, as you've not had a titration study and they have no idea of what optimum pressure might be

As for suggestion, the majority uses either ResMed or PR machines, I've only used ResMed machines
Since you're female, might suggest "AirSense 10 AutoSet for Her"
AirSense 10 AutoSet for Her, does whatever the regular AutoSet do and have an extra mode "AutoSet for Her', designed specially for females as females apnea and pressure requirement different than man

Good luck

[Image: ResMed-AirSense-10.png]
[should say "AutoSet, AutoSet for Her, Elite or CPAP"]

[Image: xAirSense10_AutoSet_for_Her.jpg.CROP.thu...WgSnVC.jpg]
AirSense 10 AutoSet for Her




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#3
Greetings and a thumbs up for doing your own research!

Yes, definitely an APAP! A CPAP is a constant pressure, regardless of if you need that amount of pressure all the time or not. Yes, the pressure CAN be changed, but it is changed by a human (you or a technician) not by the machine in response to your breathing and need for a different pressure - which changes during the time you are sleeping.

Also, please be SURE to get a machine that is data capable - it REALLY helps in determining how the pressure and your breathing are doing.
Evpraxia in the Pacific Northwest USA
Diagnosed: 44 AHI when supine, O2 down to 82%
Treated since 20 Sept 2014:: 0.7 AHI, Settings 7-15, EPR on Full Time at Level 3
Better living through CPAP/APAP machines!
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#4
An APAP machine can function as a CPAP machine but a CPAP can't function as APAP. Make sure you get a machine that provides full data that *you* can look at.

I have an APAP machine that is used in CPAP mode. I did that because most of my apneas are central ones, not obstructive. At a steady pressure of 6.6 almost all obstructive episodes are treated and my more common central episodes are treated with supplemental oxygen from a different machine. I suspect actually that I would be fine with just the O2, but I stay on the APAP machine to get full data that can reassure me that treatment is actually working or warn me when it stops working.

But YOU may need the changing pressure in response to events that only an APAP machine can provide. If it turns out you only need CPAP, well, perhaps that might change with time and if it does you'll already have the machine to treat it.

So definitely do your best to get a proper APAP machine that provides FULL data that you can inspect yourself. No matter how good your doctor is he can't give you the attention you can!

Ed Seedhouse
VA7SDH

The above is my opinion.  It is just possible that I may, occasionally, be mistaken.

I am neither a Doctor, nor any other kind of medical professional.

Everything put together sooner or later falls apart.
Your brain is not the boss.
Our forefathers took drugs.
He's no fun he fell right over.
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#5
My personal opinion now is "buy as much machine as you can easily afford"... Auto BiPAP, then Auto CPAP, then plain CPAP -- even if you only 'need' CPAP. I like the idea of having both 'auto' (etc.) as options for either comfort or just reporting. With 'auto', you'll have the benefit of the machine manufacturer's extensive studies on analysis and reporting on 'optimal pressures'.
Sleep Apnea has given me a terrible memory. Please forgive me if I've repeated myself.
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#6
Hi shutz1012,
I would get an APAP for the same reasons others in this thread have mentioned.
Here is a link to help you with which machines to buy or which ones to avoid: http://www.apneaboard.com/wiki/index.php...ne_Choices .
Good luck to you on your machine decision.
trish6hundred
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#7
Thanks everyone! My doc is in the process of completing the necessary paperwork/script to get the ball rolling on the machine. I talked to the DME affiliated with the hospital I work at and they said I will need to meet with a resp. therapist to get fitted for a mask and to educate me on the machine. My doc said there was a 10 day, I believe, "trial" period, then they give you the correct settings. I have no idea, but I did tell her I wanted an APAP.
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#8
After selecting a data capable machine make sure you download one of the data tracking softwares offered on this site for free to evaluate your data and make adjustments to your therapy as needed.
Coffee
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#9
Apap. With no titration study the Doc hasnt a vlue what your pressure should be. And only sn educated guess with a titration study that is usually only in the ball park of what it really needs to be.
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