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CPAP triggering asthma/wheezing?
#11
You might find this article interesting.

http://www.healthguidance.org/entry/1091...idity.html
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#12
(06-26-2016, 03:54 AM)holden4th Wrote: You might find this article interesting.

http://www.healthguidance.org/entry/1091...idity.html

holden4th, "interesting" would be an understatement! A google search brought up many more articles about this. The consensus is that both low and high humidity (and low and high temperatures) can trigger asthma episodes, even for people with mild disease, like me. The suggested optimal humidity range for those with asthma is 35 - 50%. Such an eye-opener!

Most likely the air from the machine that I was breathing into my lungs was too humid, triggering asthma symptoms of wheezing, coughing and chest tightness. I am feeling a little better every day now that I am on the steroid inhaler, but airways are still twitchy, and I still have a wheeze if I push air out to empty my lungs. Have the coughing, too.

I am eager to start APAP again, with proper humidity. Looking at the ResMed Clinical Guide, it states that with Climate Control on AUTO, the humidity is 85%, which would be too high for me. If AUTO is 85% and in MANUAL there are 8 settings, 8 being the highest (85%, I assume), and if I want it between 35 - 50%, then 4 should be a good setting, right?

So, my current plan is:

-Keep with the steroid inhaler until breathing is healthy again.
-Have Pulmonary Function Test.
-See sleep doc/pulmonolgist, hear what he says. Show him my findings.
-Start APAP again with:
Climage Control in Manual
Level 4 humidity
Hose Temperature 72


"Perseverance, secret of all triumphs."
Victor Hugo
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#13
As you are sensitive to the humidity, you might want to try "passover" humidification - fill the tank with water but turn the heating and hose heat off. This will provide a small amount of humidity. Quite a few people do this, it might be enough humidity for your comfort without triggering asthmatic symptoms.
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#14
Good idea, chill, and I might end up trying it. The problem is that not enough humidity is bad for people with asthma, too, and that might not be enough. 35% - 50% is the sweet spot, apparently.

This will be a trial and error process, and eventually I will know what works best for me. Today it is 82 degrees outside with a humidity of 64% and it feels absolutely oppressive out there. Took a short walk and felt awful.

I just can't imagine how anyone, even non-asthmatics, can breathe 85% humidity during PAP therapy (the AUTO setting on my machine) during sleeping hours (about 7 hours a night for me), and not feel like they were being waterboarded.
"Perseverance, secret of all triumphs."
Victor Hugo
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#15
(06-26-2016, 01:28 PM)Kris the Crone Wrote: The problem is that not enough humidity is bad for people with asthma, too, and that might not be enough. 35% - 50% is the sweet spot, apparently.

You can get a cheap hygrometer and look at it at bed time. This will give you some idea of how much extra humidity you might need that night.

Ed Seedhouse
VA7SDH

Your brain is not the boss.

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#16
(06-26-2016, 02:06 PM)eseedhouse Wrote: You can get a cheap hygrometer and look at it at bed time. This will give you some idea of how much extra humidity you might need that night.

For sure! I'm on it, thanks.

"Perseverance, secret of all triumphs."
Victor Hugo
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#17
(06-26-2016, 11:03 AM)Kris the Crone Wrote:
(06-26-2016, 03:54 AM)holden4th Wrote: You might find this article interesting.

holden4th, "interesting" would be an understatement! A google search brought up many more articles about this. The consensus is that both low and high humidity (and low and high temperatures) can trigger asthma episodes, even for people with mild disease, like me. The suggested optimal humidity range for those with asthma is 35 - 50%. Such an eye-opener!

Most likely the air from the machine that I was breathing into my lungs was too humid, triggering asthma symptoms of wheezing, coughing and chest tightness. I am feeling a little better every day now that I am on the steroid inhaler, but airways are still twitchy, and I still have a wheeze if I push air out to empty my lungs. Have the coughing, too.

I am eager to start APAP again, with proper humidity. Looking at the ResMed Clinical Guide, it states that with Climate Control on AUTO, the humidity is 85%, which would be too high for me. If AUTO is 85% and in MANUAL there are 8 settings, 8 being the highest (85%, I assume), and if I want it between 35 - 50%, then 4 should be a good setting, right?

So, my current plan is:

-Keep with the steroid inhaler until breathing is healthy again.
-Have Pulmonary Function Test.
-See sleep doc/pulmonolgist, hear what he says. Show him my findings.
-Start APAP again with:
    Climage Control in Manual
    Level 4 humidity
    Hose Temperature 72
I was wondering how things are going for you now? I'm finding myself in a similar situation. Originally from California, I moved to Nevada and it triggered asthmatic issues and eventually I was tested and found to have moderate obstructive sleep apnea. After I developed fibromyalgia which really messes with my muscles. I was using my cpap for two days then they said I needed an oxygen machine which I could not sleep with it on and couldn't try it more before going to visit family back in California. (Without the oxygen machine because it's HUGE)

I usually only use my rescuer inhaler several times a month and take montelukast 10mg every night. I was in California for two weeks where I got sick from my sister with a sore throat and coughing. A few days after when I was getting better I suddenly started having severe chest heaviness and issues breathing to where I had used the remaining 50 or so puffs in my inhaler in several weeks. I tried using my cpap because I constantly read how it helps asthma sufferers and I could not do it, my systems worsened. I also had to get a breathing treatment and was put on 4 days of prednisone. I have no other meds besides my ventolin HFA and montelukast for asthma. I'm slightly getting better with my asthma having the worst flare ups during menses but I need a control inhaler and waiting to hear from my doctor. I didn't do so well on Breo and another (either qvar or advair)

So lately I have been waking up lately with puffy swollen eyes and I worry that's due to hypoxia. So I started to try using my cpap again for like a little bit of time awake to get used to it (hadn't used it since the last incident) and I was like okay I'm comfortable but as soon as I stopped it I felt very heavy in my lungs, was having trouble getting a breath in to yawn. Used my emergency inhaler and so I just feel awful since. I called my cpap provider and am waiting for a response to try the setting that eases the pressure when exhaling. But again I'm still in California so no oxygen machine that I need to use and my settings on my machine are locked so if they change it I have to head back to Vegas where I'm going from comfortable 65-75 degrees to temps of 115-120.

Machine is: Cpap Phillips respironics dreamstation
Pressure:8 (ramp is on starting at 5)
Humidity: 3-4
Mask: full face air fit F10
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#18
I would go back to your doctor, It sounds like you need a bilevel/bipap machine and you need to use the o2, at least till you sort this out. you should be able to hire something, bottle gas?
The bilevel will help you breathe out, try and get one with Ti and rise time to shape the breath The resmed S type may be suitable
new user http://www.apneaboard.com/wiki/index.php...re_success
mask fit http://www.apneaboard.com/wiki/index.php...ask_Primer
From machine or sleepyhead, set the min CPAP 1cm below median pressure. Or 2cm below 90/95%. max at 20cm for now. Forum will help you fine tune settings
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#19
I'm fairly new so apologies I don't know everything you've mentioned.

What is Ti and rise time? And what do you mean "to shape the breath"  Is the resmed S type a different cpap machine?
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#20
sorry, I get like that sometimes and just blurt stuff out, thinking it's understood. There is no reason for you to have known this.
As you know asthma makes it hard to breath out. A bilevel/bipap where you have high inhale and low exhale pressure takes a lot of breathing effort away. You will find it much easier. Rise time is how fast it raises from low pressure to high pressure. Ti is how long the pressure lasts on inhale. You want a quick, high inhale, to help with a slow exhale, to give you time to breathe out fully. Talk with your doctor about the best machine to use. It is the machine I'd look into in your position.
new user http://www.apneaboard.com/wiki/index.php...re_success
mask fit http://www.apneaboard.com/wiki/index.php...ask_Primer
From machine or sleepyhead, set the min CPAP 1cm below median pressure. Or 2cm below 90/95%. max at 20cm for now. Forum will help you fine tune settings
Post Reply Post Reply


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