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CQ, CQ, CQ... calling all ham radio operators...
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Thumbsup CQ, CQ, CQ... calling all ham radio operators...
CQ, CQ, CQ... this is KB9xxx calling any available hams.... CQ, CQ, CQ...

This is the check-in thread for all Apnea Board members who are also licensed ham radio operators. Got a call-sign? Check in here and let's do some good o'l fashioned rag-chewin'. For privacy purposes you may not wish to reveal your entire call sign... maybe put some xx's in for the last couple of letters...

I'm re-posting some of the ham talk from our old forum in this thread also to get us going...

73

DE KB9xxx

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03-03-2012 09:37 PM
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Post: #2
RE: CQ, CQ, CQ... calling all ham radio operators...
[copied some of the old "ham talk" posts from the old forum here]



PaulaO Wrote:I am a ham radio operator (KG4***). I have been for quite some time but am just now getting around to setting up a real "shack".

I like growing plants. We live in the mountains of western NC, USA and I've been getting into native plantings over the last several years. We hired a friend to do some work outside and one of his jobs will be clearing a large section of the front so I can put in another plant place.
03-03-2012 09:37 PM
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Post: #3
RE: CQ, CQ, CQ... calling all ham radio operators...
PaulaO,(time=1303141249) Wrote:I am a ham radio operator (KG4***). I have been for quite some time but am just now getting around to setting up a real "shack".
No way.... I've been a ham since about 1998. KB9xxx... (don't want to reveal the full call sign due to privacy).

I have a Yaesu FT-840 that I use with my multiband verticle, 80 meter inverted V dipole, 20 meter inverted V dipole, & 10 meter dipole, and I have a 2 meter base at home and 2 handheld 2 meter radios.

My dad's been a ham since the 1960s - he got me into it. Currently have my General, and if I ever get enough time to study, I'd like to get my Extra Class license - got all the books, just need to set aside time to do it.

Convinced my wife to get her Technician also last year. I got my General back when you had to pass a 12 or 13 wpm Morse Code test. Haven't used code in years.

Geesh, Paula - I haven't been on in quite a while... if you ever get setup on either 40 or 80 (75) meters maybe we could have a QSO - not sure how propagation is this time of year between NW Indiana and your neck of the woods. Dont-know


73 Wink

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03-03-2012 09:39 PM
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Post: #4
RE: CQ, CQ, CQ... calling all ham radio operators...
PaulaO Wrote:I have an inverted V dipole and a 2 meter base antenna on the roof. Actually, no, they're down right now 'cause we're getting the roof fixed. I just bought a used HF rig (Icom 730) and hope to get on air with it soon. Prior to that one, I have a friends long-term loan of an Icom 703 (I may forget to give it back and use the other as a mobile rig).

I have a 2 meter rig somewhere. It used to be on my other desk and I listened in on the Mt Mitchell repeater (the tallest mountain east of the Mississippi so lots of people could hit it). We've been in a near constant state of renovation here at the house for over a year. Stuff is in boxes all over the place as we shuffle stuff from one room to the other. So somewhere, nicely packed and protected, is my 2m and all my ham books.

I've recently gotten into SDR (software defined radio) but understand about half of what I know about it. LOL I have a set of boards to build an interface but it is surface mount components. I guess I got my first license in '02 since it is up for renewal next year.

(and I'm going to delete my call sign like you did. can you edit your post to remove it? thanks.)
03-03-2012 09:39 PM
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Post: #5
RE: CQ, CQ, CQ... calling all ham radio operators...
Ltmedic66 Wrote:Well, I'm not a radio operator, but I can tell you that my county has partnered with local operators to provide emergency communications in the event of a catestrophic disaster (we get a lot of hurricanes down this way). I believe the system is called ARES-RACES, if that makes any sense to you two.

It's a totally foreign world to me. I use a radio as a part of my work every day, but all I know is that I push a button and someone always answers on the other end. Kinda like magic.
03-03-2012 09:40 PM
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RE: CQ, CQ, CQ... calling all ham radio operators...
Ltmedic66,(time=1303432124) Wrote:I believe the system is called ARES-RACES, if that makes any sense to you two.
Yep, when all infrastructure-dependent communications fail, hams can provide a valuable service to the community. That's one of the reasons I've got back-up 12 volt deep-cycle batteries and a small solar panel system for recharging them.

ARES / RACES is the "Amateur Radio Emergency Services / Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Services".

I'm not part of my local group here in NW Indiana yet... so many goals & projects... so little time... Dont-know

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03-03-2012 09:40 PM
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Post: #7
RE: CQ, CQ, CQ... calling all ham radio operators...
PaulaO Wrote:The good thing about ham radio and disasters is that hams don't need cell towers, we're self-powered (most of us use batteries or solar or combination), can be extremely mobile, and we can talk around the world on 5 watts or less. We even can use GPS to track rescuers in the field.
03-03-2012 09:40 PM
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Post: #8
RE: CQ, CQ, CQ... calling all ham radio operators...
Why not become a HAM?

Tired of surfing the web? Frustrated with all the spam in your email box each day? Angry with all the popup ads that insist that you "act now" to get free, "unbiased" news delivered each day to your in-box?

Does mainstream media make you want to scream? Do you want to throw things at your TV when idiots seem to control all the news you receive? Do you yearn to communicate with decent, common people who generally don't have something to sell to you?

Are you PO'd at all the new-fangled high-tech do-jiggers and gadgets that claim to offer everything you ever wanted in modern communications devices, but never seem to deliver quality news at an affordable price? Do you want to crush with extreme violence every Ipod, Ipad, DVR, smart phone, eReader, or cable/satellite TV box you see?

Well then, have you considered becoming a HAM RADIO OPERATOR?

The term "Ham Radio" is a slang term used for Amateur Radio Operators.

From Wikipedia:

Quote:The origins of amateur radio can be traced to the late 19th century though amateur radio, as practiced today, did not begin until the early 20th century. The first listing of amateur radio communications receivers is contained in the First Annual Official Wireless Blue Book of the Wireless Association of America in 1909. This first radio callbook lists wireless telegraph stations in Canada and the United States, including 89 amateur radio stations. As with radio in general, the birth of amateur radio was strongly associated with various amateur experimenters and hobbyists. Throughout its history, amateur radio enthusiasts have made significant contributions to science, engineering, industry, and social services. Research by amateur radio operators has founded new industries, built economies, empowered nations, and saved lives in times of emergency
.

Quote:Amateur radio operators use their amateur radio station to make contacts with individual hams as well as participating in round table discussion groups or "rag chew sessions" on the air. Some join in regularly scheduled on-air meetings with other amateur radio operators, called "nets" (as in "networks") which are moderated by a station referred to as "Net Control". Nets can allow operators to learn procedures for emergencies, be an informal round table or be topical, covering specific interests shared by a group.

Ham Radio can be completely independent from all external systems - world-wide communication is possible with a small compact radio, a few feet of cooper wire and a 12-volt automotive or marine battery. No need for phone lines, cable service, electrical grid or tie-in to an infrastructure of any sort.

I became a "ham" in 1998. My dad has been a ham since the 1960's. It has been a rewarding and satisfying hobby. I encourage you to consider it...

Here's some links to get you started:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amateur_radio

http://www.eham.net/newham/

http://www.arrl.org/new-to-ham-radio

http://howto.wired.com/wiki/Become_a_Ham_Radio_Operator

And, here's videos to whet your appetite:












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03-03-2012 09:42 PM
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Post: #9
RE: CQ, CQ, CQ... calling all ham radio operators...
original article at:
http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2011/11/1...test=faces


[Image: 1445037516813.jpg?ve=1&tl=1]


Radio Days Are Back: Ham Radio Licenses at an All-Time High

The newest trend in American communication isn't another smartphone from Apple or Google but one of the elder statesmen of communication: Ham radio licenses are at an all time high, with over 700,000 licenses in the United States, according to the Federal Communications Commission.

Ham radio first took the nation by storm nearly a hundred years ago. Last month the FCC logged 700,314 licenses, with nearly 40,000 new ones in the last five years. Compare that with 2005 when only 662,600 people hammed it up and you'll see why the American Radio Relay League -- the authority on all things ham -- is calling it a "golden age."

"Over the last five years we've had 20-25,000 new hams a year," Allen Pitts, a spokesman for the group, told FoxNews.com.

The unusual slang term -- a "ham" is more properly known as an amateur radio operator -- described a poor operator when the first wireless operators started out in the early 1900s. At that time, government and coastal ships would have to compete with amateurs for signal time, because stations all battled for the same radio wavelength. Frustrated commercial operators called the amateurs “hams” and complained that they jammed up the signal.

People like John Pritchett have used the slang term ever since.

“It takes an inquisitive mind that wants the challenge to speak with the rest of the world,” Pritchett told FoxNews.com. “I meet a lot of people as a result amateur radio. It’s a fascinating experience to meet somebody who you’ve talked to for years -- when you finally meet them and go, wow, that’s you.”

Pritchett has been a ham for over 35 years. He sits in his ham shack slowly turning the dial on his amateur radio and listening attentively for a voice through the high radio frequency. But he’s not looking for aliens: Pritchett is dialing in to make contact with someone around the world.

“W6JWK, This is John in Fresno, California,” he says.

Pritchett can communicate with people around the globe or even astronauts in space by talking through his microphone or using Morse code.

With more people joining the hobby, local ham radio businesses are growing as well. Amateur Electronics Supply in Las Vegas sells everything to do with ham radios, from transceivers, amplifiers and antennas to handhelds.

“We have clientele from all walks of life," manager Luke Rohn told FoxNews.com. "We have church groups who are interested in ham radio for a viable source of communication in times of natural disaster. We have young kids that find ham radio interesting. Maybe they’ve heard about it through their father and grandfather and it’s a lot of fun for them.”

According to the American Radio Relay League, retirees and emergency groups are among the main reasons for the nearly 30,000 new hams that pick up the hobby each year.

Ham is a boon for safety as well as a fun pastime: When normal communications methods fail and cellphone towers are jammed, ham radios will still work and can help out in disaster situations, because they don’t require towers to relay the signal.

“Amateur radio came into play very much during the major earthquake in the Bay Area in 1989. The only thing I had was a little handheld radio. Nothing else worked, telephones didn’t work, cellphones didn’t work, amateur radio just kept right on working,” Pritchett said.

Looking to ham it up a bit with some friends? Try a fox hunt -- the radio equivalent of ham-to-ham combat. In a fox hunt, local amateur radio clubs search for a transmitter (called the fox) using their homemade antennas.

“The fox hunting is really fun -- the thrill of the chase, the competition of being the first to find the transmitter,” said Rob Mavis, president of the Clovis Amateur Radio Pioneers club in Clovis, Calif.

Ham radio is inexpensive fun, as well: All you need is a couple hundred bucks to get started and a FCC license -- which is free, but requires a $10 to $12 fee to cover expenses.

So join the latest craze -- no iPhone app required.

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03-03-2012 09:44 PM
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Post: #10
RE: CQ, CQ, CQ... calling all ham radio operators...
PaulaO Wrote:Amen brother, preach it!

Ham radio operation can be, and really should be, off the electrical grid. We aren't dependent on cell towers or landlines. We have our own towers and lines! There are 'repeaters', a system where a signal is picked up by one antenna which then airs it allowing users who are out of range from each other to communicate.

While ham radio may be considered a low cost hobby, it can get rather expensive quickly. Friend of mine says it is like getting an Easter dress. You'll need new shoes, a new bag, a new hat.... For instance, I am heavily lusting the antenna they are singing from! Holy cow! Me want.

During a hurricane, NOAA gets a good chunk of its information from a group of hams across the world who relay information. Hams are a vital part of the Red Cross and the Salvation Army emergency plans.

It's fun. It's clean. It's really cool. The technology may seem old fashioned but it is far from it. I'm with a group who is designing a software defined radio. I'm with another group of hams with disabilities, working together to modify equipment and figure out ways to get it all to work when hands can't operate a mic or eyes can't read the frequency meter.

Heck, I've listened in to the International Space Station! They have a good ham radio and nearly every set of crew has at least one licensed operator.
03-03-2012 09:45 PM
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