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Can a CPAP inflate a balloon ???
#11
LOL...... no problem. i was afraid there was a difference between PSI and psi and i had got it wrong.
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#12
(04-12-2012, 11:57 AM)SuperSleeper Wrote: Wow... cool.... didn't think anyone would really try that experiment.

Nice job, Bill. Smile

I had no doubt. :-p I wish this forum had "like" functions. That's awesome!
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#13
(04-12-2012, 12:11 PM)Dreamcatcher Wrote: But the experiment is not over ??? Its only been half done. After a balloon as been inflated what pressure does it put out when deflating so you get the same effect as a blowing cpap machine.

Here's your answer. This morning I blew up a balloon and hooked it up to a manometer. You can see in the picture it's a pressure of about 24 cm HOH.
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#14
Y'all make me laugh. Not that I think you're all jokers, but that you actually try these things! Successfully!

And the other night, I'm almost asleep, and I get a thought. I get my best ones at that moment. Anyway, the thought was: a CPAP could not truly inflate a lung. To do that, it would need enough pressure to ALSO push up on the diaphragm, ribs, etc. Which is why a true ventilator is at a higher pressure.
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INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.




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#15
Thats fantastic! A pressure of 24cm, that means a balloon gives out more than most machines. You'd think that when you get your gale in your mask that the pressure is immense yet its nothing next to a "Balloon" Too-funny

One more thing is this across the board or does it change depending on shape of balloon or size of balloon?

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#16
(04-18-2012, 03:41 AM)Dreamcatcher Wrote: Thats fantastic! A pressure of 24cm, that means a balloon gives out more than most machines. You'd think that when you get your gale in your mask that the pressure is immense yet its nothing next to a "Balloon" Too-funny

Those gales occur because of a high flow rate. When you have a leak like that the machine has to increase the flow rate to keep the pressure constant.

Quote:One more thing is this across the board or does it change depending on shape of balloon or size of balloon?

It very much does depend on things like the size and shape of the balloon.

And the history. Balloons have a "memory". It takes more pressure to blow one up the first time because you have to stretch the fabric out.
Sleepster
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INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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#17
Thinking about it, though, that 24cm, if it was a CPAP pressure, wouldn't it be the same as trying to breathe with enough force to keep a balloon inflated, all night? Not likely to injure, but not a negligible effort. The last time I was involved in an all-out birthday party, the blowing up balloons job was not at all the plum assignment I thought it would be...
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#18
(04-18-2012, 08:40 PM)Ozone Wrote: Thinking about it, though, that 24cm, if it was a CPAP pressure, wouldn't it be the same as trying to breathe with enough force to keep a balloon inflated, all night?

Yes. But CPAP pressures don't go above 20 cm, AFAIK.

Quote: Not likely to injure, but not a negligible effort. The last time I was involved in an all-out birthday party, the blowing up balloons job was not at all the plum assignment I thought it would be...

Well, it takes a lot more effort to blow up a balloon that has never been blown up before. That's why you see people stretching them out first. But, after you blow one up the first time, it's easier to do it the next time because the first inflation irreversibly stretched it out.

Also, it takes more pressure at the begining. You'll notice that you tend to use your cheeks to start the inflation of the balloon, and then your lungs later when the going gets easier.
Sleepster
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INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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#19
(04-18-2012, 09:14 PM)Sleepster Wrote:
(04-18-2012, 08:40 PM)Ozone Wrote: Thinking about it, though, that 24cm, if it was a CPAP pressure, wouldn't it be the same as trying to breathe with enough force to keep a balloon inflated, all night?

Yes. But CPAP pressures don't go above 20 cm, AFAIK.

Quote: Not likely to injure, but not a negligible effort. The last time I was involved in an all-out birthday party, the blowing up balloons job was not at all the plum assignment I thought it would be...

Well, it takes a lot more effort to blow up a balloon that has never been blown up before. That's why you see people stretching them out first. But, after you blow one up the first time, it's easier to do it the next time because the first inflation irreversibly stretched it out.

Also, it takes more pressure at the begining. You'll notice that you tend to use your cheeks to start the inflation of the balloon, and then your lungs later when the going gets easier.
to be clear, was 24 the pressure required to blow up the balloon or the pressure in the balloon after it was blown up and put on the manometer. i can't imagine that at 20 the balloon stopped but at 24 would inflate. i've read that some bi-pap's go up to 25 and 30.
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#20
(04-18-2012, 09:28 PM)greatunclebill Wrote: to be clear, was 24 the pressure required to blow up the balloon or the pressure in the balloon after it was blown up and put on the manometer.

It was the pressure in the balloon after it was blown up. You can see that the balloon in the photo had already been blown up before it was attached to the manometer.

Quote:i can't imagine that at 20 the balloon stopped but at 24 would inflate. i've read that some bi-pap's go up to 25 and 30.

I think it would take a lot more than 24 cm to start blowing up a balloon. Especially one that had never been blown up before.
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INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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