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Canoe camping Cpap battery
#1
I am extremely frustrated in trying to find a Cpap battery for a week's trip into the BWCA. I have spent hours searching threads and the dilemma seems to come down to cost vs weight. I have a Devilbiss standard. Do not need the humidifier.

So here is are my two questions: what is the lightest weight SLA battery for CPAP?

Question two: what is the least expensive light weight battery that will work with my machine?

I tried to call Devillbiss but was cut off twice, so the best I can find is it requires 8ah It will run on 12 volts.

I ordered and tried an Anker Astro E7 which is listed at 25000mah and the machine will not power up. The lights come on, but not enough power to run the machine. Anker says they have nothing that will work. Apparently my machine exceeds the 4 amp output of their battery packs which run off USB and are restricted by the output of a USB jack. Tried running the Anker with an inverter, but no luck.

Was able to run the machine with a car battery and inverter, but it is not practical to portage a car battery 3/4 mile over some slippery and rugged trails.

Various brands of lightweight battery kits sold for my machine start at $300. I can buy two very nice pack sacks for that price, maybe even hire someone to carry a deep cycle battery. I would like to keep the cost as low as possible, because this is all the battery would be used for. For other types of camping, power outages etc. have plenty of deep cycle boat batteries around.

I do have Anker's solar charger, but that depends on the weather.

I have thought about going without, but Mayo says I have one of the worst cases they have ever seen. So that is not an option.

I know there are a lot of threads on this, but they all need to be put together, perhaps in a spreadsheet, that would make it easy for a user to figure out which way to go.

Thanks in advance and sorry for digging up what some probably see as a dead horse.
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#2
(06-19-2015, 02:02 PM)Oldguide Wrote: Thanks in advance and sorry for digging up what some probably see as a dead horse.


Yes that horse has been beaten quite thoroughly Too-funny
You can have it fast, cheap, or easy. Pick any one.
Search function will give you tons of info.
I use my PAP machine nightly and I feel great!
Updated: Philips Respironics System One (60 Series)
RemStar BiPAP Auto with Bi-FlexModel 760P -
Rise Time x3 Fixed Bi-Level EPAP 9.0 IPAP 11.5 (cmH2O)
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#3
Hey Oldguide! I wish I could help you out. I'm just commenting so I can follow what information you gather. I'm a kayak and hang camper and have been wondering what I can use to power my CPAP without sinking my kayak or my bank account! Hopefully, we can figure something out!

Starr
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#4
go to germany and get the alaxo stent Big Grin i am convinced this thing will work for apnea, but that the fda will never approve it due to risk of infection if improperly cleaned. majority of people will not have incentive enough to swallow this cure - literally - i am one; the thought of putting that into my airway gives me shivers - but if you really want freedom and you can learn how to do it, it would be the ticket.
هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه
Tongue Suck Technique for prevention of mouth breathing:
  • Place your tongue behind your front teeth on the roof of your mouth
  • let your tongue fill the space between the upper molars
  • gently suck to form a light vacuum
Practising during the day can help you to keep it at night

هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه
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#5
Mark D,

Been there done that.

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#6
Hi Oldguide,
WELCOME! to the forum.!
There are quite a few threads about battery power here on the board but hang in there for answers to your questions.
Much success to you with your CPAP therapy.
trish6hundred
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#7
The Anker Astro E7 is only 5 Volts. You need 12V.

[Image: beatdeadhorse5.gif]

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#8
Mongo,

Thanks for the info. That is what I found out after I bought the battery. Lucky it was returnable. Good to know someone is listening.


Starr,

Here's what we have so far, gathered together in one place that I hope will save others the insult of a post like the above.

What we have are three classes and weights. Battery outputs and CPAP inputs are registered in amp hours and voltage. You may see some CPAP batteries with amp hours in the thousands-those are milliamperes hours. A 20,000 mah battery is a 20 amp hour battery.

First, there are regular lead acid batteries, sort of like the one in your car. The big difference is you want a deep cycle battery, which in my part of the country are sold as marine batteries. Why? Deep cycle batteries are made to take a heavy initial charge, like starting a boat motor, then maintain their charge for some time. Deep cycle batteries are great for car or cabin camping, but they weigh ALOT! By that I mean as much as 50 pounds or more. In short, heavier than a lightweight canoe.

Second, we have sealed lead acid (SLA), also known as AGM (absorbed glass mat) batteries. These are used for mobility scooters and similar vehicles. The problem is their specs are all over the map as are their weights. The rule tends to be the lower the amp hours, the lighter the weight and the lower the cost. If your machine consumes 4 amps per hour then a seven amp hour battery won't last long. The lightest SLA I could find was eight pounds, with an amp hour rating of six. I believe the price was $30. Some folks will buy several of these so they can be recharging one while using another.

Those who know this better than I can correct me but expect to pay $50 on up for an SLA with decent capacity. Weight will be about 13-20 pounds. Those of us who put stuff in packs have packs weighing about or less than that.

SLAs are also bulky leading to the issue of how do you carry them. They take up room in a pack plus I am not sure i would put one in a pack with other stuff, given what abuse packs can take. You can buy a case for an SLA which helps that situation some.

Some of these are advertised on a certain auction site as fitting certain CPAP models. Cost is $100+. Weight is 25 pounds.

Third are the various breeds of lightweight battery built with a variety of methods. Many are specifically sold as CPAP batteries by CPAP dealers. They can go for $200 to $500+. The best deal I found was one company having a weekend special for a little over $200 for a battery that normally goes from $279-$300+. Weights on these can be 1-3 pounds. Plus they are compact. If you do a lot of backpacking and canoeing they are probably worth it.

There are also manufacturers who make batteries for cell phones, tablets, etc.They are USB output, so you are restricted to USB's limit of four volts.

I did find some other possibilities. Anker makes the Astro Pro2 second generation which has a non-USB output and 20ah (advertised as 20,000mah). It claims to have a 9-12v port, but only 4.5 amps. It is $80. The question is will it work? Anyone used this? Could find only a few references to it.

Saw in one post that the first generation Astro Pro2 has higher output. It is $99.

The other is the much-discussed Poweradd Pilot Pro 32ah battery for $130. Reviews on this are mixed as a search will tell you. It does apparently work for CPAP, when it works. The big question for wilderness travelers is do you want your battery to go out three or four days in?

Others are the Energizer XP18000a, but it is $180.

Two people on Amazon reviewed the Bix Power MP100 which is $129. Bix Power also makes a 42.5 ah battery that is $206. There is several in between (check out their web site). Bix seems to market mainly at laptop users, but they do make one they market as a CPAP battery, the 160, for $209.

An intriguing one is the XTPower 10ah battery for $49.

So as far as I can tell it is down to the sale battery for $200, the Anker or one of the Bix Power offerings. So it would be nice to hear from any Anker and Bix users out there since the sale ends on Sunday.


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#9
(06-19-2015, 07:55 PM)Oldguide Wrote: Mongo,

Thanks for the info. That is what I found out after I bought the battery. Lucky it was returnable. Good to know someone is listening.


Starr,

Here's what we have so far, gathered together in one place that I hope will save others the insult of a post like the above.

Sir we agree not to make things personal here as part of the deal. You just made it personal.
You were flippant in your posts so why should you not expect it of others?
Quote:Various brands of lightweight battery kits sold for my machine start at $300. I can buy two very nice pack sacks for that price, maybe even hire someone to carry a deep cycle battery.


Quote:I know there are a lot of threads on this, but they all need to be put together, perhaps in a spreadsheet, that would make it easy for a user to figure out which way to go.

Why not you build it as your contribution to this board?

This is undoubtedly the most helpful and kind imaginary people I have ever met on a BB.

If you feel you were insulted why not file a complaint and see if the Mods agree with you?


I use my PAP machine nightly and I feel great!
Updated: Philips Respironics System One (60 Series)
RemStar BiPAP Auto with Bi-FlexModel 760P -
Rise Time x3 Fixed Bi-Level EPAP 9.0 IPAP 11.5 (cmH2O)
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#10
Two other things to consider, Oldguide.

One, is a solar charger practical? If you will be spending significant amounts of time in places where you can charge, that will save you weight because you won't need as many amp-hours.

Two, if your machine runs natively on 12 volts DC then, using the proper connecting cables recommended by the CPAP manufacturer, you can connect directly to the battery and not have all that loss due to the inverter. This is the case, for example, for the Philips-Respironics machines.

I think lithium-ion battery technology is the recommended choice for rechargeable batteries when size and weight are issues.

Have you thought about hiding the battery inside the canoe? That way your companion can help you carry it during portages. Too-funny

Sleepster
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com


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