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[Diagnosis] They want me to use a CPAP with oxygen concentrator
#11
They can't make you use any one particular mask. It may take you some time to find one that will work for you but there's a lot of them out there! Even the masks within the same type can be very different. Find a supplier that will work with you. Many have mask trial option where you can try out a mask for X amount of time then exchange it for another if it doesn't work.

As for if you need O2 at night, acceptable levels with or without CPAP is 92 or higher with 90 being the minimum at night. Daytime O2 is of course higher. Some people with sleep apnea, their O2 does not lower much with each event, but doesn't recover as quickly. Some people get really low with each event but then recover nicely after the event. Some people just seem to keep a low O2 at night no matter what.

My suggestion would be to talk to the doctor about how low it went with treatment, how fast did it recover, and what he/she thinks will happen if you used the CPAP without O2. As in is there a possibility that with treatment, your blood oxygen will just even out. There are recording oximeters you can get for fairly cheap. You can wear one each night and keep track of the blood O2. If it just is not staying within safe zones, then yeah, bite the bullet and get a concentrator. You are too young to lose more brain cells than you already have.
PaulaO2
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INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.




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#12
(05-04-2015, 03:12 PM)PaulaO2 Wrote: You are too young to lose more brain cells than you already have.

Paula, I'm to old to lose anymore than I've lost and I may be late to that party. Wink

CMS makes several modules of oximeters that record that are reasonably priced and accurate enough for your needs. I use the model (50F?) that has a wrist strap and a comfortable finger sensor that records all night. Depending on the model of pap you're using you can import the data from the pulse ox into a program named sleepyhead and see the night both with your sleep events and oxygen level lined up simultaneously and get an idea what's going on.

If you and your doctor do decide to go with a concentrator justMongo has the hot set up with the Everflo. Ask the doctor to prescribe a Phillips Respironics Everflo by name to make sure that's what you get. They're relatively quite and at your young age, the oxygen concentration it is able to put out will encourage you to dance in the morning Bigwink

Oh yea, as far as noise level, they cycle very regularly so after a while you get used to the monotonous intake/exhaust sound it makes if you aren't sensitive to that kind of thing. Mine actually lulls me to sleep. If you can't get along with the noise, you can get 30 foot tubing and put it in the hall or further away from where you sleep. I know a guy here in Florida that has his out on his enclosed porch. YMMV


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#13
And, BTW, you don't need a power failure alarm with that concentrator.
I thought I was going to remotely control the power to mine -- i.e. leave the unit's switch on and control the 120 VAC at the plug with a radio controlled relay. HAH. The unit has a power outage alarm; so, when the power switch is on, but there is no power to the plug, the alarm sounds.
And, it is quite loud.
INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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#14
Our sleep doctor prescribed oxygen for my wife along with CPAP. Her concentrator is made by Invacare. At first I could hear the change over from one compressor to the other but after a couple of nights I didn't hear it anymore. The actual running of the compressor didn't bother me even at the beginning. When it was first delivered I planned to put it in the hall and run the tubing through the baseboard into the bedroom but I got used to it so quickly that I decided it wasn't worth it. It does add some heat to the room but the AC takes care of that.

Many years ago I did some design work for Invacare (before they moved design and as I recall manufacturing from OH to New Zealand) and toured the plant. They ran all concentrators for a 48 hour break in period and there were a lot of them on floor to ceiling shelves in a room that was maybe 20 feet X 20 feet. I was amazed at how quiet they were. I think they may have only used one compressor back then because I don't remember hearing any change over noise.
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#15
(05-03-2015, 10:53 PM)Apneaprincess Wrote: Adding a concentrator is kinda a big deal since it's an extra machine which can be large and loud to add to the CPAP machine.

While a louder machine, it has a very calming methodical thump. Unless you are very easily awoken, it shouldn't bother you. No louder than my grandfather's clock.
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#16
(05-05-2015, 03:24 PM)Clay L Wrote: Our sleep doctor prescribed oxygen for my wife along with CPAP. Her concentrator is made by Invacare. At first I could hear the change over from one compressor to the other but after a couple of nights I didn't hear it anymore. The actual running of the compressor didn't bother me even at the beginning. When it was first delivered I planned to put it in the hall and run the tubing through the baseboard into the bedroom but I got used to it so quickly that I decided it wasn't worth it. It does add some heat to the room but the AC takes care of that.

Many years ago I did some design work for Invacare (before they moved design and as I recall manufacturing from OH to New Zealand) and toured the plant. They ran all concentrators for a 48 hour break in period and there were a lot of them on floor to ceiling shelves in a room that was maybe 20 feet X 20 feet. I was amazed at how quiet they were. I think they may have only used one compressor back then because I don't remember hearing any change over noise.

There is only one compressor. There are two tanks that contain a zeolite. The compressor is pumping up one tank to 15psi while the 2nd tank is supplying oxygen. When that 2nd tank drops to 10 psi, the tanks are switched and the 2nd tank is dumped to atmosphere. You can hear the tanks switch because of the dump of pressure.
INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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#17
i use the invacare and like it a lot. somewhat noisy, but my computer fan is about as loud, and when i crank up the s9 too, it's a pleasant little band, and without it, i would probably miss the company. dr recently adjusted nighttime oxy from 2L to 4, but there's no increase in the noise.
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#18
(05-05-2015, 08:54 PM)justMongo Wrote:
(05-05-2015, 03:24 PM)Clay L Wrote: Our sleep doctor prescribed oxygen for my wife along with CPAP. Her concentrator is made by Invacare. At first I could hear the change over from one compressor to the other but after a couple of nights I didn't hear it anymore. The actual running of the compressor didn't bother me even at the beginning. When it was first delivered I planned to put it in the hall and run the tubing through the baseboard into the bedroom but I got used to it so quickly that I decided it wasn't worth it. It does add some heat to the room but the AC takes care of that.

Many years ago I did some design work for Invacare (before they moved design and as I recall manufacturing from OH to New Zealand) and toured the plant. They ran all concentrators for a 48 hour break in period and there were a lot of them on floor to ceiling shelves in a room that was maybe 20 feet X 20 feet. I was amazed at how quiet they were. I think they may have only used one compressor back then because I don't remember hearing any change over noise.

There is only one compressor. There are two tanks that contain a zeolite. The compressor is pumping up one tank to 15psi while the 2nd tank is supplying oxygen. When that 2nd tank drops to 10 psi, the tanks are switched and the 2nd tank is dumped to atmosphere. You can hear the tanks switch because of the dump of pressure.

Well that is what I get for listening to the DME tech that brought the machine out. His explanation of switching from one compressor to the other was wrong.
I wondered why they would use two compressors but figured he knew what he was talking about.
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#19
(05-03-2015, 10:53 PM)Apneaprincess Wrote: ...they want me to use an oxygen concentrator.

...I'm 33 years and overweight but not morbidly.

...Do I really need this? ...I plan to ask my doctor and provider if I really need this too.

The entire reason for xPAP and the entire problem with SA is that it is one significant cause of 02 desat. When you use an xPAP, typically this is to prevent SA from causing desat. But xPAP won't fix all SA issues, and there are many other desat issues that have nothing to do with SA.

That's the bad news. The good news is that xPAP is a perfect 02 delivery system when supplemental 02 is added, and that will be effective in minimizing desat for those non-SA issues.

It is pretty easy to judge whether you really need this or not, by measuring this with an oximeter, which can be done with or without xPAP. If you dip below 92%, that is considered when things are getting serious by many standards, and of course how many times and for how long enter into this as well.

I would factor out completely any weight issues; yes, it can be a factor, but ignore what might or might not be a factor and concentrate on the bottom line, which is how desatted you are getting. Whether you have a weight issue or not is not important, because whether you have a weight issue or not, the bottom line is the bottom line, regardless. If you dip below 92, and often, I think the answer to your question is pretty clear.

If you lose whatever weight you would like to, and keep it off, possibly that will push you into a realm where you do not need the concentrator anymore. Or not. Motivation. But there is only one way to find out.
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#20
(05-04-2015, 01:22 PM)eseedhouse Wrote: I use one at 3 liters per minute. As soon as I started it I noticed a definite increase in my daily well being.

Yes the dang thing is noisy. I sleep with a pair of sound cancelling headphones on my head, not connected to any sound source, but just to reduce the roar from the concentrator, which they do quite well at the expense of having to buy lots of AAA batteries. I already had the headphones.

I found foam earplugs ineffective and also anything stuck in my ears tends to amplify the pulses from the veins in the ear canal so I am constantly aware of my heartbeat and I find that disconcerting. The headphones at least don't have that effect. Also I can listen to music through them when I am on the road and they reduce the traffic roar. They were expensive, but to me they were worth it. These days I can't imagine living in the city without a decent pair of sound cancelling headphones.

I think the noise factor depends on the machine you get and maybe even the rate. My late Dad had one of those machines for 3 years (set to 2 liters) and other than a methodical thump, you didn't notice the sound. The cats didn't care at all. I actually had insomnia problems for awhile afterwards because I was so accustomed to that thump. If it does bother you, try other white sounds. Running a fan on low is the most common, but there are also apps and sound machines that do a good job.

I lived in Boston for a year and Minneapolis for five. City sounds never bothered me, although I never had to feel the truck traffic rumbling through. Think of Joe Pesci in My Cousin Vinney. I had far more trouble with morning bird ruckus when I moved in with my parents to help my Mom.
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