Hello Guest, Welcome to Apnea Board !
As a guest, you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use.
To post a message, you must create a free account using a valid email address.

or Create an Account


New Posts   Today's Posts

[Diagnosis] They want me to use a CPAP with oxygen concentrator
#21
(05-04-2015, 02:59 PM)Apneaprincess Wrote: I believe my sleep study showed that my oxygen levels are low even with the CPAP although it did help with the apnea. During the study they used the hose that just goes over the nose, it was awful, I hated it. I have sensory issues so I'm pretty scared about having to use a CPAP especially if they make me use a nasal only one. Thanks to everyone who has replied so far, has helped.

Worry not fair princess, you will only need an O2 adapter for your CPAP hose. This fits in between the hose & your mask and has a small spigot to which you will attach the tube from the concentrator.
[Image: adapter.jpg]
You won't really know it's there. These can be bought from any CPAP store or Chemist.
Put the concentrator in another room by all means. That's a good idea, but really the more modern concentrators make very little noise. I've been on supplemental oxygen for over 15 years & this my set up.
[Image: bed_setup.jpg]
The green tube is for the oxygen. Good luck.
[Image: signature.png]Keep on breathin'
Post Reply Post Reply
#22
(05-05-2015, 08:54 PM)justMongo Wrote: There is only one compressor. There are two tanks that contain a zeolite. The compressor is pumping up one tank to 15psi while the 2nd tank is supplying oxygen. When that 2nd tank drops to 10 psi, the tanks are switched and the 2nd tank is dumped to atmosphere. You can hear the tanks switch because of the dump of pressure.

There are usually two "processing" tanks with zeolite in the tanks. I think there's a third "buffer" tank where the oxygen from the processing tanks is stored to keep the pressure constant.

Google "pressure swing adsorption" for an explanation, but it may make your head hurt. It takes a lot of thinking before you really understand it. It's complicated and sort of seems to violate the laws of physics at first. BTW, a lot of the simple descriptions of how it works are wrong.

However, it does work.

Get the free SleepyHead software here.
Useful links.
Click here for information on the main alternative to CPAP.
If it's midnight and a DME tells you it's dark outside, go and check it yourself.
Post Reply Post Reply
#23
Very interesting thread for me. My sleep apnea was was 22.6 events per hour, and my lowest O2 level was 77%. As a result, I was prescribed BIPAP last August (2015), and a bi-level pressure of 9 /15. After 6 months of using it, I noticed although the number of headaches were reduced, there would be days i would still have them so I asked my Dr. for an overnight oxygen test. There were at least 4 times my O2 level still dipped to 85%.

My doctor discussed increasing the pressure, however, I'm not really excited about that at all. At what point does one become a candidate for an oxygen concentrator? Are there any medical references for this info? Greatly appreciate any insight anyone may have on this!
Post Reply Post Reply


#24
I would also add that I don't feel as much energy as I had hoped being on BIPAP would bring. My doctor said there are a percentage of people who use CPAP don't. He mentioned some sort of drug as a last resort for that, but my regular doctor doesn't recommend it. Perhaps an oxygen concentrator would add that sort of benefit also?

Anyone have any firsthand experience in that regard?
Post Reply Post Reply
#25
After having used 2 lpm O2 with my cpap for 8 to 10 years Medicare decided I no longer qualified/needed O2. I did without for 2 years but my wife and I both noticed memory issues. It took a while but I got that sorted out with Medicare and resumed supplemental oxygen nearly two years ago. By all means give it a try . I'm not sure how much permanent damage I accumulated but you have many more years at risk than I did. I have flown with a smaller travel size concentrator with no problem other than a few additional minutes in security. As I recall I did have a letter from my doctor. Good luck Princess.
Stan
Post Reply Post Reply
#26
(04-17-2016, 03:34 PM)Krull Wrote: I would also add that I don't feel as much energy as I had hoped being on BIPAP would bring. My doctor said there are a percentage of people who use CPAP don't. He mentioned some sort of drug as a last resort for that, but my regular doctor doesn't recommend it. Perhaps an oxygen concentrator would add that sort of benefit also?

Hi Krull, You haven't declared your location & things could be different where you live.
I have been on APAP + oxygen for over 16 years so perhaps my experience may be of help.
My symptoms are pretty much the same as yours & sad to say so are the results of my treatment. Over the years I have made the following observations...
1. Supplementary oxygen does not assist in preventing O2 de-saturation in sleep, but it does help mightily in recovering from events & restoring quickly the pre-event O2 level, thus reducing the length of time in hypoxia.
2. Low O2 sat. affects memory and can & does produce ischemia both cranial & cardial.
3. Low O2 sat. causes poor concentration, headaches, daytime sleepiness & fatigue.
4. There are no solutions in drugs, but Modafinil will remove the possibility of "micro sleeps" at the wheel. If I have to drive that day I take half a 200mg tablet in the morning.
5. It is necessary to decide carefully when & when not to drive a motor vehicle.
6. One can do without the concentrator for short periods & even over-night if necessary. That's not life threatening but will none the less take time to recover from.
Summing up - Supplemental oxygen may help you, but doubtful. If I had to guess, I would say you have a restricted upper airway which XPAP may treat (to the extent of saving your life) but not cure. Therapy air pressure will prevent your airway from obstruction, but not from reducing in size (restricting).
So far I have not found a solution, but am still working on it. I would suggest you have a "sleep endoscopy" which is to be my next attempt at a solution.
This examination is done using a tiny fibre optic camera inserted into the upper airway via the nose, after the patient is put into an induced "sleep". Done by an ENT at a hospital - results are said to be "helpful", with the doc. being able to see exactly what is going on.
That all said, I would advise you to try the concentrator and ask your doc. for a Sleep Endoscopy. Keep trying & good luck.
[Image: signature.png]Keep on breathin'
Post Reply Post Reply


#27
(04-17-2016, 06:41 PM)woozie38 Wrote: Hi Krull, You haven't declared your location & things could be different where you live.

Hi Geoff, thank you for the prompt response and insight, it's greatly appreciated.

I live in Suffolk, VA, so basically at sea level. I'm also male, and 52.

I don't have enough sleepiness that it would be an issue driving, but it does become an issue sometimes when I'm at the computer (once in a while almost fall asleep while working).

I also just don't feel the energy level I believe I should have, which I had hoped BIPAP would have made a more significant difference.
Post Reply Post Reply
#28
(04-17-2016, 06:53 PM)Krull Wrote: I live in Suffolk, VA, so basically at sea level. I'm also male, and 52.
I don't have enough sleepiness that it would be an issue driving, but it does become an issue sometimes when I'm at the computer (once in a while almost fall asleep while working).

I also just don't feel the energy level I believe I should have, which I had hoped BIPAP would have made a more significant difference.
Hi Krull,
IMHO CPAP or any PAP is unable to correct some of the issues being experienced by many of the subscribers on this & other boards. The reason is, upper airway restriction is brought about by mechanical movement of an organ or organ part. PAP pressure even at 20 cms/h2O is only 0.28psi & is in many cases insufficient to oppose the the forces attempting to constrict the airway. The docs. usual approach is to up the pressure & in so doing produce another set of breathing problems.
Mico sleeps are not really related to tiredness as such. They are insidious & often go unnoticed. However mico sleeps are the cause of many many road accidents & authorities are just beginning to realise it. They now investigate this possibility if the driver was male, & the time was between 1400hrs & 1530hrs. Speaks for itself.
I too had hoped for better improvement in my energy levels & decrease in tiredness when I began PAP therapy, but that didn't happen. But, as my doc says, I am still here & without PAP most like would have left this world some years ago. For this at least I'm grateful. I am 78.

[Image: signature.png]Keep on breathin'
Post Reply Post Reply
#29
Krull,

I just read your post and the replies, and I'm a little confused. When you did the overnight O2 test, did you compare the results to data from your BiPAP machine to see if the O2 desats coincided with obstructive apneas?

What kind of data did your doctor use to make the recommendation to increase your BiPAP therapy pressure?

What kind of AHI/RDI numbers do you typically see from your BiPAP machine?

(04-17-2016, 03:29 PM)Krull Wrote: Very interesting thread for me. My sleep apnea was was 22.6 events per hour, and my lowest O2 level was 77%. As a result, I was prescribed BIPAP last August (2015), and a bi-level pressure of 9 /15. After 6 months of using it, I noticed although the number of headaches were reduced, there would be days i would still have them so I asked my Dr. for an overnight oxygen test. There were at least 4 times my O2 level still dipped to 85%.

My doctor discussed increasing the pressure, however, I'm not really excited about that at all. At what point does one become a candidate for an oxygen concentrator? Are there any medical references for this info? Greatly appreciate any insight anyone may have on this!

Post Reply Post Reply


#30
Hi Green Wings,

I did not, but my doctor may have. I wore an overnight sensor on my finger for a couple of days and then mailed it back to them, and they interpreted the results.

I would assume O2 desats would coincide with OSA. If that is the case, would that mean supplemental O2 is not needed? I don't know much about this situation, as I haven't found a good reference article on CPAP / BIPAP with supplemental oxygen - I did find many articles about CPAP VS supplemental oxygen.

As for the AHI/RDI score, do I need to remove the media from my Resmed and use the sleepyhead SW to interpret that? What should I be looking for?
Post Reply Post Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Extra Oxygen Eliminated My [Central] Apnea. Phil57 2 274 10-09-2017, 03:39 PM
Last Post: nicholb
  Oxygen Concentrator [while traveling] shortyd 8 240 10-01-2017, 09:27 PM
Last Post: shortyd
  Turning on Oxygen Concentrator before CPAP? mogulman 5 269 09-25-2017, 01:56 PM
Last Post: mogulman
  Medicare rules for oxygen HalfAsleep 6 264 09-14-2017, 09:50 PM
Last Post: E.W.
Question CPAP at Altitude and Oxygen concentrator, Options for portable unit? mogulman 7 225 09-06-2017, 03:21 PM
Last Post: mogulman
  Anyone start on CPAP and then add oxygen...? S.L. Ping Beauty 9 321 08-24-2017, 03:10 PM
Last Post: S.L. Ping Beauty
Question Help. Old CPAP user coming back, Oxygen needed? mogulman 21 597 08-22-2017, 02:12 PM
Last Post: Walla Walla

Forum Jump:

New Posts   Today's Posts




About Apnea Board

Apnea Board is an educational web site designed to empower Sleep Apnea patients.

For any more information, please use our contact form.