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[Diagnosis] What does all this mean?
#1
My doctor gave me this information and I don't know what it means: 19-36R hour
28 supine
88%

Anyone know what this means to me?

Thank you.

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#2
Hi lanitaawd,
WELCOME! to the forum.!
I'm not sure what the numbers mean but supine means you slept on your back.
Hang in there for more answers to your questions and best of luck with your CPAP therapy.
trish6hundred
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#3
Thank you.
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#4
Hi lanitaawd, welcome aboard
Ask the doctor for copies of the sleep studies, you,re entitled to have
I,m guessing .. 19-36R hour 28 supine is Apnea hypopnea index (AHI) http://www.apneaboard.com/wiki/index.php?title=AHI

88% Blood oxygen saturation http://www.apneaboard.com/wiki/index.php...saturation
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#5
Thank you.
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#6
It's possible the R is RDI (respiratory disturbance index) Respiratory disturbance index http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Respiratory...ance_index

It's similar but includes events that disturb your sleep but don't meet the technical definition of apnea.

From what I have seen on the forums this is not a typical abbreviation; was this from the doc's personal notes or something?
Sweet Dreams,

HerbM
Sleep study AHI: 49 RDI: 60 -- APAP 10-11 w/AHI: 1.5 avg for 7-days (up due likely to hip replacement recovery)

"We can all breathe together or we will all suffocate alone."
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#7
Yes, this was the information he wrote on a note for me to have of the information.
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#8
lanitaawd,

I'm taking a wild guess here:
(02-11-2014, 09:38 PM)lanitaawd Wrote: My doctor gave me this information and I don't know what it means: 19-36R hour
28 supine
88%
My guess is that the doctor said "AHI" in connection with those numbers. I would guess:

Overall AHI = 19. As in you stop breathing or almost stop breathing about 19 times for every hour of sleep. That would put your overall OSA into the moderate range.

REM AHI = 36. As in---if you were to get a full hour of REM sleep, the data indicate you would stop breathing or almost stop breathing about 36 times in that hour of REM sleep. That puts your REM OSA into the severe range. So you probably are not getting enough REM sleep in a typical night's sleep.

Supine AHI = 28. As in---if you were to sleep for a full hour on your back, the data indicate you would stop breathing or almost stop breathing about 28 times during that hour of sleeping on your back. That puts your back sleeping OSA into the borderline between moderate and severe OSA.

And finally, it appears that your SaO2 (oxygen saturation) dropped as low as 88% at some point during the night. Anything below 90% is a concern, but the drop in SaO2 is most likely due to the apneas and hypopneas you have while asleep.

You will undoubtedly be told that you should use a CPAP. Once you adjust to a CPAP, all of these numbers, including the SaO2 saturation numbers should return to the normal range and stay there---as long as you use the CPAP every time you sleep.

You might want to wander over to my blog to read my advice for thoses newly diagnosed with OSA. Here's the appropriate link:
Advice for those newly diagnosed with OSA
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#9
I like RobySue's explanation.

It's still a very cryptic description.

I called my doctor's office and asked the doc's assistant to send me my sleep study results and she emailed them to me about 5 minutes later.

Lot's of complicated stuff in there but at least all the abbreviations are standard and when I want more detail it will be there.
Sweet Dreams,

HerbM
Sleep study AHI: 49 RDI: 60 -- APAP 10-11 w/AHI: 1.5 avg for 7-days (up due likely to hip replacement recovery)

"We can all breathe together or we will all suffocate alone."
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#10
(02-12-2014, 09:40 AM)robysue Wrote: REM AHI = 36. As in---if you were to get a full hour of REM sleep, the data indicate you would stop breathing or almost stop breathing about 36 times in that hour of REM sleep. That puts your REM OSA into the severe range. So you probably are not getting enough REM sleep in a typical night's sleep.

Robysue,

I have a question due to my lack of knowledge. I was under the impression that breathing interruptions might keep one from attaining REM sleep. Is this not the case?

Best Regards,

PaytonA

Admin Note:
PaytonA passed away in September 2017
Click HERE to read his Memorial Thread

~ Rest in Peace ~
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