Hello Guest, Welcome to Apnea Board !
As a guest, you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use.
To post a message, you must create a free account using a valid email address.

or Create an Account


New Posts   Today's Posts

Do statins really reduce your risk of heart disease?
#21
Many traditional cures of course are good, but what it comes down to is healthy eating is still the best way to stay healthy.
Post Reply Post Reply
#22
The Polymeal: a more natural, safer, and probably tastier (than the Polypill) strategy to reduce cardiovascular disease by more than 75%
Oscar H Franco, scientific researcher, Luc Bonneux, senior researcher, Chris de Laet, senior researcher, Anna Peeters, senior researcher, Ewout W Steyerberg, associate professor, Johan P Mackenbach, professor

Abstract
Objective Although the Polypill concept (proposed in 2003) is promising in terms of benefits for cardiovascular risk management, the potential costs and adverse effects are its main pitfalls. The objective of this study was to identify a tastier and safer alternative to the Polypill: the Polymeal.

Methods Data on the ingredients of the Polymeal were taken from the literature. The evidence based recipe included wine, fish, dark chocolate, fruits, vegetables, garlic, and almonds. Data from the Framingham heart study and the Framingham offspring study were used to build life tables to model the benefits of the Polymeal in the general population from age 50, assuming multiplicative correlations.

Results Combining the ingredients of the Polymeal would reduce cardiovascular disease events by 76%. For men, taking the Polymeal daily represented an increase in total life expectancy of 6.6 years, an increase in life expectancy free from cardiovascular disease of 9.0 years, and a decrease in life expectancy with cardiovascular disease of 2.4 years. The corresponding differences for women were 4.8, 8.1, and 3.3 years.

Conclusion The Polymeal promises to be an effective, non-pharmacological, safe, cheap, and tasty alternative to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and increase life expectancy in the general population

Read full article http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC535974/
Post Reply Post Reply
#23
My favorite chocolate is dark chocolate with white chocolate right on its heel. While trying to find a gift for someone, I saw some chocolate covered cherries that were my brother's favorite candy as long as the center was not that thick creamy center. I then saw some chocolate covered blueberries which is one of my favorite fruits. If it had been covered with dark chocolate with a liquid center or no center I would have bought them to try. Wonder if I can live on fish (shark and dover sole I like) and dark chocolate! lol
Post Reply Post Reply


#24
One of the healthiest diets is to eat a bit of everything, but in moderation. The old adage "Breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, sup like a pauper" remains true, as doe the Swiss habit of FDH (Fress Die halfte - eat half) - I am sure your Granny always said to leave a bit on your plate - so it is. The biggest problem with American diets is not how unhealthy they are (and they ARE, very often), but the size of the proportions. Americans still eat like farmers, but do not put in the physical work for it anymore. So FDH is basically very good advice.
Post Reply Post Reply
#25
American diets can be unhealthy I agree. Portion sizes, unless a patron specifically requests that they be upsized, even in a sit down restaurant, are not as plentiful as they used to be and that is partly due to demand of the patrons and partly the economy. Even if the portions are huge, a patron can take the left over food home and it is our responsibility to eat sensibly and healthy. Just because their are huge portions doesn't mean we have to eat it all in one meal.
Post Reply Post Reply
#26
(12-20-2013, 06:59 AM)me50 Wrote: American diets can be unhealthy I agree. Portion sizes, unless a patron specifically requests that they be upsized, even in a sit down restaurant, are not as plentiful as they used to be and that is partly due to demand of the patrons and partly the economy. Even if the portions are huge, a patron can take the left over food home and it is our responsibility to eat sensibly and healthy. Just because their are huge portions doesn't mean we have to eat it all in one meal.

Perhaps they don't have to, but they do. And even the smaller portions I find in restaurants when visiting the US are still far larger than the average British or European proportions.

And this is still a major problem. Eat less, eat more rounded, less fat, more soluble fibres and get exercise. That would reduce the need for a ton of meds.
Post Reply Post Reply


#27
FDA Expands Advice on Statin Risks
http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/Consumer...293330.htm

Sleep problems occurring on statins may in some cases relate to sleep apnoea.
Simvastatin has previously been reported to cause sleep problems more commonly than pravastatin.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3029510/

A drug used by around one million Britons to lower cholesterol is linked to "significant" sleep problems, according to research.
Dr Golomb said: "Patients taking simvastatin who are having sleep problems should consult their doctor. Sleep deprivation is a major problem in a minor number of people."
In past studies, some people on statins have reported having insomnia or nightmares.
In the UK, sleep disruption is not recorded as a potential side effect in product information for simvastatin or Zocor Heart Pro.
Dr Malcolm Kendrick, author of The Great Cholesterol Con, said many patients were not aware of the side effects and their concerns were often dismissed by doctors. He said: "These side effects can include subtle effects on cognitive function including memory, sleep and aggression levels which have been highlighted by scientific research papers."
Read more http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/articl...-gain.html



Post Reply Post Reply
#28
There is something fundamentally wrong with a system of creating new drugs and prescribing them for an entire decade plus to millions of people and still not know exactly for whom they have helped.
With a system like this they could doing permanent damage on certain individuals and have zero accumulation of data and proof.
Post Reply Post Reply
#29
Followup: 60,000 fewer patients took vital statin drugs following ABC's Catalyst program
http://www.theguardian.com/media/2015/ju...st-program
Post Reply Post Reply


#30
Just to add a note, Lipitor did the largest study involving women with 2000 participants. The result was more women died on statins than not on statins. At best, they don't help, at worse, they make things worse (for women).

The state guidelines really pushed for doctors to push statins on patients for some years. The diabetic educator ragged on me about it too despite my finally getting my cholesterol below 200. I told her I wasn't going to take them and to put it in my chart.

I'm told that bradycardia isn't really a problem unless you are fainting or having other symptoms. Clearly, that's because of lack of oxygen. Cpap is helping that.

I would also like to find medical justification for M and Ms with peanuts as part of a special food group.
Post Reply Post Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
Grin [Health] Regular chocolate consumption may be linked to lower risk of heart flutter DeepBreathing 2 84 05-25-2017, 12:39 AM
Last Post: dwd1249
  Something to Grapple with: How Wily Lyme Disease Prowls the Body icyura10 2 476 08-26-2016, 07:34 AM
Last Post: Sleeprider
  Question about low heart rate me50 16 1,049 06-22-2016, 04:32 AM
Last Post: holden4th
  Statins make me hurt justMongo 30 3,177 08-01-2015, 02:13 PM
Last Post: GrammaBear
  WWII AIRMAN RECEIVES PURPLE HEART 70 YEARS AFTER ACTION justMongo 3 580 03-26-2015, 07:51 PM
Last Post: truetopath
Thumbsup Increased coffee consumption reduces risk of diabetes DeepBreathing 4 1,481 04-25-2014, 11:54 AM
Last Post: retired_guy
  Huh? Low-salt diet ups risk of fatal heart attack? ApneaNews 15 4,257 10-05-2013, 10:13 AM
Last Post: Don in Austin

Forum Jump:

New Posts   Today's Posts




About Apnea Board

Apnea Board is an educational web site designed to empower Sleep Apnea patients.

For any more information, please use our contact form.