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Do throat exercises cure sleep apnea?
#1
Doing research on google for natural ways to cure sleep apnea, I've read that doing throat exercises can cure it. Is this true? And if it is, what are some good throat exercises for this?
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#2
The way I see it:

CPAP is like going to work every day and getting a steady paycheck.

Anything else is like playing the lottery.
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#3
(08-15-2013, 11:55 AM)Paptillian Wrote: The way I see it:

CPAP is like going to work every day and getting a steady paycheck.

Anything else is like playing the lottery.

Thanks Paptillian, I won't waste my time researching throat exercises any further.
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#4
One of the most commonly recommended exercises is playing the didgeridoo correctly. This involves a method called circular breathing. While regular didgeridoo playing could theoretically cure very mild obstructive apnea, the most many could hope for is a reduction in PAP treatment pressure necessary for successful therapy.
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#5
(08-15-2013, 12:27 PM)jgjones1972 Wrote: While regular didgeridoo playing could theoretically cure very mild obstructive apnea, the most many could hope for is a reduction in PAP treatment pressure necessary for successful therapy.

"Honey, good news... my snoring won't annoy you anymore. I bought a didgeridoo!"
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#6
(08-15-2013, 12:27 PM)jgjones1972 Wrote: One of the most commonly recommended exercises is playing the didgeridoo correctly. This involves a method called circular breathing. While regular didgeridoo playing could theoretically cure very mild obstructive apnea, the most many could hope for is a reduction in PAP treatment pressure necessary for successful therapy.

That's good to know that it will reduce the symptoms, but I was looking for something that would permanently cure it. My research on google for permanent cures for sleep apnea also suggested that losing weight may help cure it for good. Does anyone know if weight has anything to do with sleep apnea?
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#7
Excess weight, particularly for men, does tend to mean that the various tissues in and around the throat tend to be somewhat more prone to flabbiness and therefore airway obstruction. There is a definite correlation between levels of excess weight and required treatment pressure for an individual (across individuals, not so much). And, in rare cases, weight loss will reduce the obstructive apnea to a point where CPAP treatment is no longer required. Similarly, there is a definite correlation between didgeridoo use and required treatment pressure.

However, there is currently no reliable cure for obstructive sleep apnea. Realistically, you should resign yourself to the fact that, with current technology, you are probably going to be on CPAP for the rest of your life. It sucks, but there it is.
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#8
(08-15-2013, 01:10 PM)Sleepless Nights Wrote: My research on google for permanent cures for sleep apnea also suggested that losing weight may help cure it for good. Does anyone know if weight has anything to do with sleep apnea?

There is a high correlation of OSA with Obesity. It is generally accepted (by many) that if someone with OSA is Obese, then substantial weight loss could decrease the severity of OSA and possibly eliminate mild OSA.

There are still some complications concerning causality though. Is Obesity more likely to cause OSA, or is OSA more likely to cause Obesity?

Some of us have very severe OSA, yet are not Obese. Some lose weight when they go on PAP therapy - some gain weight. Some find treatment pressure can be decreased when they lose substantial amounts of weight. Some lose weight and pressure needs stay the same.

I'm of the mind that untreated OSA can contribute to Obesity AND Obesity can contribute to OSA. I think this can lead into a vicious downward spiral for some.

My advice: Get a good data capable auto CPAP. Get your therapy tuned in and use the CPAP religiously. Then, if you are over-weight, lose weight and keep an eye on the data. If you can get to the point that your AHI stays very low (lower than 5) and the Auto PAP rarely if ever raises from 4cmH2O, then you can sleep without it while wearing a recording Pulse Oximeter to see if you have significant desaturations. If you don't have any desaturations, then you may be cured. Anything is possible; but, very few find that losing weight will make PAP unnecessary.

Sleep-well
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#9
If weight gain caused the obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), then weight loss will cure it.

There has been some research that indicates that toning the muscles can reduce OSA.

There are also dental appliances that may help reduce OSA.

There are surgical procedures that may cure OSA.

The chances of success with any of the above are, at best, slim. And there are some pretty nasty recovery times and life-long side effects from those surgeries.

CPAP thearapy, on the other hand, works like magic to prevent OSA. Once I got adapted to it, it's become just as natural as putting on pajamas at bedtime.
Sleepster
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#10
(08-15-2013, 12:27 PM)jgjones1972 Wrote: One of the most commonly recommended exercises is playing the didgeridoo correctly. This involves a method called circular breathing. While regular didgeridoo playing could theoretically cure very mild obstructive apnea, the most many could hope for is a reduction in PAP treatment pressure necessary for successful therapy.
By "regular playing", the inference is to play every day for hours, the way a concert instrumentalist practices. You have to become a rigorous didgeridoo athlete. Unless you have a "true calling of the heart" in life to become a master didgeridoo player, this is not a very fruitful option. On top of that, it only ostensibly works for a small percentage of people who have some types of obstructive sleep apnea, not all. This isn't just playing the odds. It's like attempting to practice at playing the odds.

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