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Do throat exercises cure sleep apnea?
#21
(08-16-2013, 03:06 PM)RonWessels Wrote: Actually, I think you will find that a lot of us here are drug users. I personally take a pill in the evening and a different pill in the morning for high blood pressure, take yet another pill in the morning for stomach acid control, and take yet another pill (this one an OTC NSAID) for the arthritis in my ankle.

I also do enjoy the occasional beer or two with/after dinner, and have been known to start camp fires at a friend's cottage that initially don't burn completely cleanly (ie. smoke).

Or did you mean something else?

lol that is some funny stuff you posted thanks for the laugh today!!
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#22
(08-16-2013, 03:06 PM)RonWessels Wrote: Actually, I think you will find that a lot of us here are drug users. I personally take a pill in the evening and a different pill in the morning for high blood pressure, take yet another pill in the morning for stomach acid control, and take yet another pill (this one an OTC NSAID) for the arthritis in my ankle.

I also do enjoy the occasional beer or two with/after dinner, and have been known to start camp fires at a friend's cottage that initially don't burn completely cleanly (ie. smoke).

Or did you mean something else?

I'm on blood pressure medicine and aspirin. Oh, right now I'm also taking celexa for anxiety. I don't know if the sleep apnea caused my anxiety or not. But I have had sleep apnea for years. I was told years ago by an old girlfriend that I stop breathing in my sleep. It was when I was diagnosed a year ago with high blood pressure and anxiety that I went to get tested for sleep apnea. My research on the internet on what causes anxiety, sleep apnea was one of those, which I already knew I had, and figured it's about time I get it treated.
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#23
(08-17-2013, 03:40 AM)Phadrius Wrote: From my own experience, I have found that there exists a correlation between weight gain/obesity and sleep apnea. My apnea became worse the last few years as I gained weight. Early this year, I went on a strict diet, joined the gym, and lost 8kg. Even though it's only a small weight loss, I found myself sleeping better (not cured though). Did a stress and heart exam, and was told by the doctor to lose weight or risk a short life span etc. So, the bottom line is, if I lose 30kg+, I may also lose the sleep apnea, or at least reduce the severity to next to nothing. I am now back to the gym, and dieting, and intend to lose 30kg. Will post once I lose the weight and let you all know whether my sleep apnea disappeared with the weight loss or not. I am determined to lose the weight.

Yes, please do Phadrius. I am really interested in knowing if losing weight can cure sleep apnea.
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#24
Please refer back to my post in this topic - it CAN but does not necessarily cure OSA - it depends on many factors, not least being the source of your apnoea, how great your weight gain/loss is, etc. I gave a detailed answer to this, and individual experiences may not, when replicated by you, produce the same results. That said, weight loss is a good thing if you are overweight. so is digeridoo playing. Both can help in the most common forms of OSA, but results may vary.

One more thing - there is no such thing as a "cure" in the standard sense - the lowered AHI and bettered sO2sats associated with a non-Apnoea state indicate remission or relief from symptoms - we don't say cure since there is nothing to cure. There is every indication that any gains made due to weight loss and throat tightening can be easily reversed, and will be due to age related conditions anyway.

This is not a way of saying give up and get used to the hose, it is a way of saying be realistic in your expectations - lose weight if you can, for any of a thousand reasons (heart disease, stroke, cancer, you name it, weight loss is a good way to minimise the risk), and, if your OSA was caused by weight gain and the laxity introduced into the tissue is not too great, then weight loss will help to ameliorate or clinically relieve your symptoms.
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#25
(08-18-2013, 08:46 AM)Sleepster Wrote:
Quote:All I am saying is, weight loss can be achieved with a good diet and exercise, if you're getting good sleep and using CPAP. So, simply resigning your self to the inevitablility of your condition is akin to giving up on hope and a better life. However, if you're one of those people who has given up on losing weight and have resigned yourself to the CPAP, then it is your choice and all the best with it.

You kinda lost me here. Are you saying that if I resign myself to needing CPAP therapy for the rest of my life I've given up on losing weight?!
Look how many of us are obese. It is a well-known fact that untreated sleep apnea causes weight gain. Phadrius is saying that many people before CPAP have trouble losing weight because of their sleep apnea condition - not because of CPAP. As we gain better control of our sleep apnea through the use of CPAP, some of us find it easier to lose weight. Of course this isn't always the case, though.

Maybe it's okay if we don't candy-coat the facts. People with untreated sleep apnea tend to be obese and over forty. I agree with Phadrius that CPAP may help sleep apneacs lose weight. I shed 40 pounds in the first year of CPAP.
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#26
I agree with what you are saying DreamDiver...but I also think that there is generally some idea among too many new PAPers that there exists some magic bullet or miraculous cure that can be found if one looks hard enough - thereby alleviating them from the necessity to "resign" themselves to PAP therapy. I think this unrealistic expectation can sometimes make it harder to accept the situation.

I'm not in any way accusing you of supporting this way of thinking...I'm just saying that I think this is why so many of us seem cynical or pessimistic when asked about these "cures".

I totally agree that proper PAP therapy can aid weight loss; unfortunately, I think some people (and I'm not referring to anyone in particular) have it backwards and cling to the idea that the prospect of losing weight means they don't have to accept or "resign" themselves to the continued necessity of PAP. Some might even see CPAP as just a temporary aid to help out until they lose enough weight that the apnea goes away.

I'm not saying that this is necessarily what has been going on in this thread, just saying that these things make some of us a little snappy...especially when something could be construed to support the view that accepting PAP, or even embracing it, is in some way giving up.

Just my two cents...
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#27
Its fact, sleep deprived people tend to eat more to make up for loss of sleep. CPAP did not help me to loose any weight, maybe I,m greedy, I like to eat, drink and be merry. Its one of the few pleasures in life remaining, I rather eat and die happy than starve myself and die miserable

Go thy way, eat thy bread with joy, and drink thy wine with a merry heart; for God now accepteth thy works. Ecclesiastes 9:7
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#28
(08-26-2013, 02:29 PM)jgjones1972 Wrote: ... I'm not saying that this is necessarily what has been going on in this thread, just saying that these things make some of us a little snappy...especially when something could be construed to support the view that accepting PAP, or even embracing it, is in some way giving up. ...
I'm reminded of the stages of grief:
Denial | Anger | Bargaining | Depression | Acceptance
We all go through this to some extent with CPAP. Some of us stay a little longer in one phase than the others. The 'resignation' stage sounds very similar to 'acceptance'. The difference is fairly nuanced, and I'm not sure where to go with that.

It's funny that there seems to be the same camp of resignation for people who wear hearing aids, but not so much for people wear glasses/contacts/etc. Why is that? Maybe it's because it sucks to wear hearing aids. You constantly have to replace batteries. Half the time, the device is ill-tuned for whatever environment you're in, or it screeches or beeps, so you miss the conversation anyway. They're expensive and rarely covered by insurance. Most of them are typically big, blobby and make us look like we belong on the special bus. Same goes for CPAP. Glasses are different in that while they are required, they don't use batteries, are fairly easy to adapt to and make life easier in an unobtrusive way. Not so much with hearing aids, dialysis, oxygen or CPAP.

But once we've vented, you're right. It's time to drop the indignation, resignation, whatever. Accept that life throws us challenges and move on.
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#29
(08-26-2013, 02:46 PM)zonk Wrote: Its one of the few pleasures in life remaining, I rather eat and die happy than starve myself and die miserable

As they say: "Eat well. Exercise. Die anyway."

Oh-jeez
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#30
Okay but please no more taxes
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