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Do throat exercises cure sleep apnea?
#31
(08-15-2013, 12:48 PM)Paptillian Wrote:
(08-15-2013, 12:27 PM)jgjones1972 Wrote: While regular didgeridoo playing could theoretically cure very mild obstructive apnea, the most many could hope for is a reduction in PAP treatment pressure necessary for successful therapy.

"Honey, good news... my snoring won't annoy you anymore. I bought a didgeridoo!"

Does anybody know of even a single confirmed case of somebody controlling their apnea playing the didgeridoo? Somehow, i suspect not.

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#32
(08-26-2013, 09:44 PM)Don in Austin Wrote:
(08-15-2013, 12:48 PM)Paptillian Wrote:
(08-15-2013, 12:27 PM)jgjones1972 Wrote: While regular didgeridoo playing could theoretically cure very mild obstructive apnea, the most many could hope for is a reduction in PAP treatment pressure necessary for successful therapy.

"Honey, good news... my snoring won't annoy you anymore. I bought a didgeridoo!"

Does anybody know of even a single confirmed case of somebody controlling their apnea playing the didgeridoo? Somehow, i suspect not.

http://www.bmj.com/content/332/7536/266#alternate
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#33
(08-26-2013, 09:44 PM)Don in Austin Wrote:
(08-15-2013, 12:48 PM)Paptillian Wrote:
(08-15-2013, 12:27 PM)jgjones1972 Wrote: While regular didgeridoo playing could theoretically cure very mild obstructive apnea, the most many could hope for is a reduction in PAP treatment pressure necessary for successful therapy.

"Honey, good news... my snoring won't annoy you anymore. I bought a didgeridoo!"

Does anybody know of even a single confirmed case of somebody controlling their apnea playing the didgeridoo? Somehow, i suspect not.


The answer is yes, there are several trials that show the effectiveness of it, but with a caveat - on its own, it will handle mild apnoea, but it is not a cure, merely a method of toning the throat - unless the cause of the loss of tone is also removed (usually, but not always, weight) there is no lasting effect - when combined with significant weight loss, there is a strong effect and once the effect is achieved, it tends to linger even after the therapy is curtailed - if there is no removal of the cause of apnoea, however, only constant return to playing (three times a week once tone is achieved) maintains the effect. Please read my earlier responses in this thread to for greater detail.
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#34
Hi. I have a didgeridoo. I find it quite difficult to play even though I have a very long history of playing wind instruments. I played in a symphony since age 8; and I went to music conservatory to study flute. I have quite healthy lungs and the ability to play all wind instruments. When I got the didgeridoo I was surprised how difficult it is. I can blow it. But I cannot master circular breathing. I used to do circular breathing on the flute. It is very difficult. I cannot master circular breathing on the didgeridoo. I thought that I could improve my apnea by mastering this instrument by playing just 20 minutes a day because that is what the study subjects did, they played only 20 minutes a day for 4 months and their apnea improved.

I am sure there is no way I can do it. (It is so boring and takes loads of wind.) Besides I have had the CPAP for less than a month and I can already sleep half way through the night. So much easier!

In addition, the didgeridoo has such a limited scope when you can barely blow it that it would be hard to stay motivated to keep trying. With other wind instruments, you can play a tune even before you perfect your tone which is motivating for a beginner. However with the didgeridoo, it requires so much ability/skill at blowing just the right way, just to make one different sound, than the first sound when you blow.
I am 56 years old. Too old to work so hard at an instrument with the main intention of improving my apnea.
I would just stick with the CPAP even though it is really uncomfortable. I am so surprised that I can already sleep for 4 hrs a night on it. (I was so nervous the first two weeks.)

Hang in there.
Kimberly from HonoluluSleep-well
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#35
It has been shown that singing exercises will also help with sleep apnea. Again with the loss of weight and all that others have referenced.
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