Hello Guest, Welcome to Apnea Board !
As a guest, you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use.
To post a message, you must create a free account using a valid email address.

or Create an Account


New Posts   Today's Posts

Does sleeping on your stomach prevent Apnea?
#1
Does sleeping on your stomach prevent Apnea?
Hi all,
I got a question. If I sleep on my stomach with my head sideways on the pillow, does that prevent Apnea? I mean facing downward would allow gravity to pull my tongue downward, rather than back into my throat right? Have any of you tried that and seen if that makes any difference? 

If sleeping on your stomach is not a good position, then you could just sleep on your side while tilting your stomach downward too, like in a diagnol 45 degree angle. Right? Does that make a difference? Does it prevent Apnea or just lessen it?

One more question: I heard that sleeping on your back is not supposed to be a good position, but with the CPAP machine on, then it's ok right? The reason I ask is because sometimes it's hard to sleep on the side with the mask on while you are pulling the hose left and right. It's easier to sleep on my back and causes the least friction. 

Thanks.
Post Reply Post Reply






Donate to Apnea Board  
#2
RE: Does sleeping on your stomach prevent Apnea?
Like so many other things, this is a case of YMMV.

Some people have positional sleep apnea and when they sleep in other positions (side or stomach), apneas are minimized or absent. For others (sounds like you, maybe?), it is a comfort issue. They prefer to sleep on their back. I believe (but perhaps someone more knowledgeable can chime in), sleeping on the back might increase apneas. Personally, even with my CPAP, I am unable to sleep on my back. I feel like I just can't breathe! OTOH, hubby (also a CPAP user), has always slept on his back! Go figure!

All that said, I use a hose management system that really helps with all my tossing and turning from side to side all night long...no getting tangled in the hose.
Post Reply Post Reply
#3
RE: Does sleeping on your stomach prevent Apnea?
I see so many people claiming the only way they can sleep is on their stomachs. I have never been able to do that and come to find out it's the worst way to sleep. It can cause neck and back issues over time. If it works for you, so be it. 

That being said, I almost exclusively sleep supine or on my back. I can sleep on my sides, but not for long as my hips and knees start complaining after about 20 minutes. This sleeping position is considered a no-no for sleep apnea. Understandably since the soft palate will collapse on the airway. However, I sleep soundly, wake refreshed, and rarely have an AHI over .5. Flow restrictions are within the acceptable range, no excessive leaks, etc. 

I suppose whatever position makes you most comfortable is the best medicine.  Thinking-about
My get-up-and-go musta got up and went.  Cool

Download OSCAR for your sleep data.  
https://www.sleepfiles.com/OSCAR


Post Reply Post Reply
#4
RE: Does sleeping on your stomach prevent Apnea?
(06-08-2022, 05:02 AM)WWu777 Wrote: One more question: I heard that sleeping on your back is not supposed to be a good position, but with the CPAP machine on, then it's ok right? The reason I ask is because sometimes it's hard to sleep on the side with the mask on while you are pulling the hose left and right. It's easier to sleep on my back and causes the least friction. 

Thanks.

Not sure where you heard sleeping on your back is not a good position, that is probably the least problematic position for your spine and neck. I personally sleep primarily on my side just because it is more comfortable for me, but either way you are going to move around in your sleep it is normal to move around to get more comfortable as you sleep so even if you start on your side odds are you are going to end up on your back at some point during the night. 

But as for your first question, well like I just said when you sleep you don't stay perfectly still and you move around while you sleep to get comfortable odds are even if you trying doing those wacky things if you naturally sleep on your back you will end up in that position while you sleep because being on your stomach is so uncomfortable specially if you have tweaked your back in the past. So is it theoretically possible? Yes, yes it is; But is it practical possible? Well unless you sleep tied down to your be so that you can not move, no not really, as such just sleep however is most comfortable to you because odds are you will end up in that position anyways.
Post Reply Post Reply






Donate to Apnea Board  
#5
RE: Does sleeping on your stomach prevent Apnea?
Prone sleeping is simply not comfortable for me, and I have observed that many prone sleepers still have severe positional apnea that results from the twisting of the neck/airway. It is also difficult to manage a mask while prone. As Booksfan said, "YMMV" your mileage may vary, but for most of us it is not practical or effective as a therapeutic position.
Sleeprider
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com

____________________________________________
Download OSCAR Software
Soft Cervical Collar
Optimizing Therapy
Organize your OSCAR Charts
Attaching Files
Mask Primer
How To Deal With Equipment Supplier


INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
Post Reply Post Reply
#6
RE: Does sleeping on your stomach prevent Apnea?
Prone sleeping is not comfortable for many including myself. A position I sleep in sometimes is a mixture between prone and side sleeping with a pillow under one side/leg holding body up at an angle. When sleeping in this position I sleep on edge of pillow so face is pointing somewhat downward. Since the body pillow keeps body at about a 45 deg up and sleeping on edge of pillow keeps head about 45 deg down my head stays perpendicular to body and doesn't get cranked uncomfortably to the side like in normal prone position. I find the pillow holding body up makes it a bit easier to breath as well.

I have always wondered how a custom bed with cutout area for head like a massage table would perform for apnea. I imagine with the right shape/comfort it could be good but I have never seen such a bed.
Post Reply Post Reply
#7
RE: Does sleeping on your stomach prevent Apnea?
Hi all,
Thanks for your responses. Has anyone ever done a sleep lab study where they take apnea patients and have them sleep on their stomach with their heads facing downward to see if it prevents the tongue from coiling back into the throat during sleep? If so, what were the results.

Of course, come to think of it, if that actually prevented apnea, they wouldn't tell us right? Since there's no profit in simple cures, as the natural health crowd always say. lol

Maybe some of you can sleep with face pointed down while on the CPAP machine to see if it reduces apnea?
Post Reply Post Reply






Donate to Apnea Board  


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  sleeping on the side Gorge 7 398 06-07-2022, 03:56 AM
Last Post: Old Bert
  [CPAP] Advice for Central Apnea and Complex Sleep Apnea pwnorris 7 339 05-11-2022, 11:21 AM
Last Post: pwnorris
  Is a oxygen level a sufficient test of healthy sleeping? camper2 0 251 05-03-2022, 02:07 PM
Last Post: camper2
  New ASV User - Not sleeping through night sleepywex 9 377 04-09-2022, 11:10 AM
Last Post: SarcasticDave94
  Severe stomach pain after changing CPAP settings Jacob130 1 224 04-05-2022, 08:58 AM
Last Post: Crimson Nape
  Self-Treating Sleep Apnea | First Night with CPAP = 0,87 AHI | Central Apnea? Dumdi 10 773 03-19-2022, 07:40 AM
Last Post: Dumdi
  Sleeping through the night - pro tips plz Captain Howdy 0 257 03-18-2022, 07:59 PM
Last Post: Captain Howdy


New Posts   Today's Posts






About Apnea Board

Apnea Board is an educational web site designed to empower Sleep Apnea patients.