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Dreaming
#11
(04-09-2016, 02:14 PM)0rangebear Wrote: For as long as I can remember I have had multiple dreams a night. I typically would remember them in the mornings and would even discuss them with others. Cool

When I first start therapy, they changed to nightmares which I assumed was do to the week I spent in ICU, just prior to starting Therapy. Angry

However, after 102 days of therapy. It appears I no longer dream, or at least can't remember them. Huhsign

Does anyone else find that Therapy effects their Dreams Thinking-about
In the few years leading up to CPAP I never had any dreams that I could remember the next day. Now I have so many dreams I wonder if I am dreaming now.
Dielaughing
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#12
Is this real or part of the Matrix?

I found before CPAP I didn't have too many dreams, but once I started therapy I started having more and more of them. Some I remember, others I don't. It seems the ones I remember are just before something wakes me up, like one of the cats.

A while back someone compared the increase of dreams with the onset of therapy to the brain finally being at to relax and play now that it didn't have to fight for oxygen.

Homer
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#13
typically, if your sleep is undisturbed, your dreams fade from memory very rapidly.

if you're experiencing disturbed sleep, you wake up a bit during, or after the dream, then you remember them.

food for thought.
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#14
(04-13-2016, 04:27 PM)tmo1138 Wrote: For years after I started CPAP I never remembered any dreams. I do from time to time now tho it's far less frequent. My doctor said that's because I'm spending more time in deep sleep and less coming up to where REM would occur.

(04-14-2016, 02:04 PM)palerider Wrote: typically, if your sleep is undisturbed, your dreams fade from memory very rapidly.

if you're experiencing disturbed sleep, you wake up a bit during, or after the dream, then you remember them.

food for thought.

Thanks for the great answers. When I started this thread a month ago I was worried that the absence of dreams was an indication of no REM sleep.

My sleep sessions continue to get longer and I have overslept a few time since may 1st. But this morning I woke up chuckling.

I had a dream, in which, I took my machine back to the DME and they made me wait in a room for a sleep doctor. After a short wait; in walked the two old guys from the Muppets,one with a thumbs down and the other with a thumbs up. Dielaughing


It was great to dream again. Dreaming







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#15
(05-10-2016, 04:25 PM)0rangebear Wrote: Thanks for the great answers. When I started this thread a month ago I was worried that the absence of dreams was an indication of no REM sleep.

My sleep sessions continue to get longer and I have overslept a few time since may 1st. But this morning I woke up chuckling.

I had a dream, in which, I took my machine back to the DME and they made me wait in a room for a sleep doctor. After a short wait; in walked the two old guys from the Muppets,one with a thumbs down and the other with a thumbs up. Dielaughing


It was great to dream again. Dreaming

Dreaming of FrankNichols? Laugh-a-lot


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#16
I'm confused by the whole dream cycle thing. Before starting CPAP I was getting almost no REM sleep at all. Maybe 20 minutes a night, max. But I had dreams all the time. I also had (and still have) a hard time getting to REM. 5-6 hours before I get there, but I spend a huge amount of time in stage 3 sleep.

At the docs office they told me that dreams occur in all 4 stages of sleep and the easiest ones to remember are in stages 1 and 2. Stage 3 and REM dreams are much deeper. They even said it's common not to remember any dreams from REM sleep (even for a normal healthy sleeper).

That sounds completely contrary to what is "common knowledge" about dreams, but it does match up with what I'm experiencing now. Stage 1 and 2 are quicker for me and I haven't really remembered dreams since I started the cpap. --Disclaimer: I've only been on cpap 2 weeks, so my sample size is admittedly small.
Happy Wife and kids
Big Yellow Jeep
Homebuilt hardtail
A Dozen Guitars
Once I can sleep, life will be perfect
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#17
(05-10-2016, 07:32 PM)partsmutt Wrote: At the docs office they told me that dreams occur in all 4 stages of sleep and the easiest ones to remember are in stages 1 and 2. Stage 3 and REM dreams are much deeper. They even said it's common not to remember any dreams from REM sleep (even for a normal healthy sleeper).

That sounds completely contrary to what is "common knowledge" about dreams, but it does match up with what I'm experiencing now. Stage 1 and 2 are quicker for me and I haven't really remembered dreams since I started the cpap. --Disclaimer: I've only been on cpap 2 weeks, so my sample size is admittedly small.

Well for what it's worth that's the way I understood it. When scientists first started studying sleep the noticed that at times the sleeper's eyes would jump around rapidly. So they would wake the subjects up and they would recount dreams. And they assumed that REM sleep was THE part of sleeping where dreams occur. Later when they got around to waking people up at other times in the sleep cycle they realized that their first conclusion was incorrect.

Ed Seedhouse
VA7SDH

Your brain is not the boss.

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#18
(05-10-2016, 04:40 PM)pupcamper Wrote:
(05-10-2016, 04:25 PM)0rangebear Wrote: I had a dream, in which, I took my machine back to the DME and they made me wait in a room for a sleep doctor. After a short wait; in walked the two old guys from the Muppets,one with a thumbs down and the other with a thumbs up. Dielaughing

It was great to dream again. Dreaming

Dreaming of FrankNichols? Laugh-a-lot

Wow! Just wow! Oh-jeez I must be reading to many posts Eat-popcorn
Ecclesiastes 5:3
a dream comes from a multitude of business Thinking-about
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#19
I have been having very vivid dreams since being on CPAP. Good to know it's not just me. The reason: yes, I think I am getting more REM sleep.
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#20
I almost forgot about this thread. After this discussion I read couple of books and a few clinical study's on dreaming and I think palerider hit it out of the park.

There is clinical evidence of a relationship between sleep disruption. dreams and psychosis.

http://www.isps-us.org/koehler/dreams.htm


It appears that less disturbed the sleep, the less we remember dreams because it takes about an hour of sleep after the dream to erase it. Some argue they occur right before REM not during sleep and are erased during REM sleep

(04-14-2016, 02:04 PM)palerider Wrote: typically, if your sleep is undisturbed, your dreams fade from memory very rapidly.

if you're experiencing disturbed sleep, you wake up a bit during, or after the dream, then you remember them.

food for thought.

I now look a it this way.
I seldom remember dreams now because I mostly sleep 4.5 to 7.0 hours at a time. I used to sleep around 2

If the APAP therapy hadn't of lengthened my sleep cycle and I was still remembering all those dreams I would be crazier that I am now
Bug-eyed....... Crazy ........ Shock-2 .......... Shock
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