Hello Guest, Welcome to Apnea Board !
As a guest, you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use.
To post a message, you must create a free account using a valid email address.

or Create an Account


New Posts   Today's Posts

Dreamstation heated tube/humidifier initial settings.
#1
I finally got a heated tube for my Philips Dreamstation, because I wasn't really happy with the humidifier in the 'Adaptive' setting and a unheated tube.

My bedroom is 65 deg. F (18.5 C) and 60% humidity. Any idea where to start with the settings? Do I start at the middle or at a low setting and work upwards?
Post Reply Post Reply
#2
Do you like it warmer and more humid, or closer to room temperature, and less humid? The machine does a pretty good job in automatic mode to deliver moisture without allowing rain-out, by detecting room temperature and humidity and automatically adjusting. The automatic mode is actually pretty conservative, and higher humidity delivery is possible with manual settings. For me, 2-3 on a scale of 5 is usually good in summer, and 3-4 in winter. YMMV
Post Reply Post Reply
#3
(10-24-2016, 08:18 PM)NorthernGuy Wrote: I finally got a heated tube for my Philips Dreamstation, because I wasn't really happy with the humidifier in the 'Adaptive' setting and a unheated tube.

My bedroom is 65 deg. F (18.5 C) and 60% humidity. Any idea where to start with the settings? Do I start at the middle or at a low setting and work upwards?

You have 10% more recommended humidity in the room (50%), do not add more moisture to your lungs, it is extremely harmful to health.

You get stunt the turbinates, they are to supply moisture to our respiratory system, if you do a machine, the turbinates stop working.

Fill the humidifier by water and evaporate it naturally, try it
Post Reply Post Reply


#4
(10-25-2016, 10:15 AM)Perchas Wrote:
(10-24-2016, 08:18 PM)NorthernGuy Wrote: I finally got a heated tube for my Philips Dreamstation, because I wasn't really happy with the humidifier in the 'Adaptive' setting and a unheated tube.

My bedroom is 65 deg. F (18.5 C) and 60% humidity. Any idea where to start with the settings? Do I start at the middle or at a low setting and work upwards?

You have 10% more recommended humidity in the room (50%), do not add more moisture to your lungs, it is extremely harmful to health.

You get stunt the turbinates, they are to supply moisture to our respiratory system, if you do a machine, the turbinates stop working.

Fill the humidifier by water and evaporate it naturally, try it

Sources? That is a lot of health effects you allege without much backing.
Post Reply Post Reply
#5
(10-25-2016, 10:35 AM)Sleeprider Wrote: Sources? That is a lot of health effects you allege without much backing.

Percentage proper indoor humidity

According to the Environmental Protection Agency US (EPA), the correct indoor humidity level is in the range of 30 to 50 percent. The humidity inside a home should be properly adjusted so that it stays within these percentage levels.

Effects of moisture unbalanced

If the percentage of humidity inside is not at the right level, you may also suffer the physical effects, and the house itself can have effects........

Regarding turbinates, use common sense when any organ of the human body ceases to use it atrophies, there are many examples, only obserbe eg disabled by breaking bone marrow, in six months your muscle mass disappears,

What it makes you think the turbinates are different ?, are not, if abused artificial humidifying the turbinates are no longer useful and atrophy.

Poer that my battle against artificial humidifiers and also with hot steam, it's crazy that I have not accepted and will not accept use humidifiers and that I live two extremely dry places, Madrid and Phoenix, even so I inform you that my turbinates work but that very well.

Note that the daily evaporation autonomous unheated a humidifier is about 45 cc, enough to add natural moisture to my respiratory system.

Sorry Google Translate



Post Reply Post Reply
#6
My turn. The use of CPAP means the individual is using a non-invasive ventilator (NIV). There is a great deal of research and anecdotal evidence that indicates additional humidification beyond ambient levels is critical for patient comfort, and to reduce risk of health effects. while NIV has not been researched to the extent of invasive ventilation, sufficient evidence points to the importance of heated humidification for patient comfort, health and compliance. You cannot compare the breathing on ambient indoor air by someone that is not on NIV, to the air pressure, with extra mask venting leak and other factors which are irritating and drying to sensitive nasal, mouth, throat and lung tissues.

Example 1 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3396215/

Quote:Inadequate gas conditioning during non-invasive ventilation (NIV) can impair the anatomy and function of nasal mucosa. The resulting symptoms may have a negative effect on patients' adherence to ventilatory treatment, especially for chronic use. Several parameters, mostly technical aspects of NIV, contribute to inefficient gas conditioning. Factors affecting airway humidity during NIV include inspiratory flow, inspiratory oxygen fraction, leaks, type of ventilator, interface used to deliver NIV, temperature and pressure of inhaled gas, and type of humidifier. The correct application of a humidification system may avoid the effects of NIV-induced drying of the airway. This brief review analyses the consequences of airway dryness in patients receiving NIV and the technical tools necessary to guarantee adequate gas conditioning during ventilatory treatment. Open questions remain about the timing of gas conditioning for acute or chronic settings, the choice and type of humidification device, the interaction between the humidifier and the underlying disease, and the effects of individual humidification systems on delivered humidity.

Example 2 http://www.clinicalfoundations.org/asset...ions10.pdf

Quote:The investigators found that, without humidification, an absolute humidity of 5 mg H2O/L was delivered. The HME provided 30 mg H2O/L but this fell to 20 H2O/L in the presence of a leak. The heated humidifier provided 30 mg H2O/L even in the face of mask leak. Comfort scores were similar for humidity ranging from 15-30 mg H2O/L. However in the absence of humidity, comfort scores fell in half. A harbinger of successful NIV is improved patient comfort as work of breathing is reduced.

At this low level of humidity volunteers reported severe discomfort related to mouth dryness. These are compelling data in light of the experiences with long-term, home nasal ventilation where two-thirds of patients report upper airway drying and discomfort. 18-21 Hospitalized patients are more likely to have elevated VE, to be febrile, to be dehydrated, to receive oxygen, and to have large mask leaks.

There is little doubt that inadequate humidification during NIV results in patient discomfort. Because patient comfort is so critical to the success of NIV, the improved comfort associated with humidification may facilitate NIV success.

Example 3. https://www.fphcare.com/getattachment/69...b0649982b/
Quote:Achieving Essential Humidity (31 °C, 100% Relative Humidity
[RH]) at the pharynx alleviates some of the side effects of NIV and may contribute to therapy success.

I'll leave you with the thought that what works for you, may not be ideal for all. I'll bet you method of turbinate reduction would be appreciated by all the ENTs that use surgery to achieve [/quote]that end.
Post Reply Post Reply


#7
As always, magnificent contribution.

My first experience with CPAP was a hot July in Arizona, brought from Spain my machine but without humidifier was so irritating the first day to buy online in the humidifier <link to Supplier #1 removed> M series. the result of warm, moist air breathing was even more disastrous.

Since that day I have not seen heat the water in the humidifier, I have learned to use other techniques that partly solves my problem.

Always I have filled the humidifier with water, I measured consumption and for 7 hours is 45 cc, not how many liters of air flowing into my lungs at the time, but that aportacion 6 cc/h time for me is enough, believe me not I dry mouth or anything.

In summer I use a different technique, in Madrid summer is torrid, froze during the day and the humidifier for 6 hours I fresh and humid air, the feeling is very pleasant.

Enjoying the fresh air that gives me the water tank previously frozen.

If it were not for this home remedy, could not withstand the hot or warm air that accentuate the cpap.

[Image: f32dfbbc002e94e66bdfc21e1b889463o.jpg]

The pass July 20 i made two measurements in my CPAP, the first held during the first 15 minutes of operation without humidifier, and the second below the frozen humidifier, the two measurements indicate the air velocity in meters per second, air temperature in degrees Celsius and relative humidity. The measurement made it into the hose at the end where the mask is connected.

The data confirm my theory, freeze the humidifier brings benefits.
First image:
[Image: a00e969d538afafb4e07fa50e3644873o.jpg]
Air temperature 28,8º C (83.84 F), Humidity 29.6%, Speed ​​1.35 m /s

second image
[Image: 06410803838018c617e49dc50568e054o.jpg]
Air temperature 24.3º C (75.74 F), Humidity 33.7%, Speed ​​1.25 m / s

As you can see there is a temperature differential of 4.5 ° C below (vs F75.74 F83.84) and a positive difference of 5% moisture, 29.6% goes to 33.7%. Breathe air in ideal conditions without turning on the humidifier.

I am doing very well this way

-----
Moderator Action: Link Removed
To maintain our status as an educational organization, the only commercial links allowed in this forum are to CPAP-related manufacturer websites. This is stated in the Apnea Board Rules with details given in the Commercial Links Policy section.
-----


Post Reply Post Reply
#8
Perchas, I only took issue with your post because you presented it as a medical issue. In reality, humidity and heated hoses are all about comfort, and it's an individual choice.

I have actually frozen the humidifier. It works great if that's what you need. It melts pretty quick, and the cold surface actually causes warm air crossing it to condense creating MORE humidity, but at a cooler temperature. Humidification is primarily about comfort. Northernguy is from the state of New York which has mild humid summers and cold winters. I don't know how he achieves 60% humidity indoors, but right now in Pennsylvania, I have 46% relative humidity in my house heated to 70 F and the outside temperature is 46 F. In winter the indoor humidity could easily drop under 20% without a humidifier. So humidification is important. In summer, with air conditioning, humidity can also be fairly low, even when outside humidity is in the 70-100% range.

I have used the machine at high altitudes where the air is very dry and cool and really appreciate the humidity there, and when I lived in California, I still liked it. In fact i added a heated hose to my M-Series when I started in 2008. So that's my comfort zone. I prefer the added warmth and humidity of the air, you like it cooler and dryer. I guess we each just need to find what works for us, and that probably won't hurt us or anyone else, huh?
Post Reply Post Reply
#9
I will rejoin the conversation.
For those unaware, in the Spring and Fall in northern New York state with the windows open, the humidity inside a home rarely drops much below 50% without air-conditioning or dehumidifier (60-65% humidity is pretty normal, especially at night). That being said, the 60% "humid" air is at 65 F, which after you warm it to near nose temperature (~80-90 F that same air becomes 31% according to my chart), so it can be humid in the room, yet drying to to your lungs and nasal mucosa.

The Dreamstation humidifier used these room conditions using 'Adaptive Setting of 3' only heats the tank to 74 F (I opened it and checked it in the morning). It really doesn't humidify very well (probably to prevent rain-out).

I purchased a heated hose. Breathing in 65 F air is not very comfortable and can still be drying with it passing through the mask all night long. I am working on getting the settings right.

Now it is getting cold and the heat is on, so my indoor humidity will approach a desert by January when it is regularly below 0 F outside. ;-)
Post Reply Post Reply


#10
Yesterday I made these measurements, PR One 60 Series: after three hours of operation with the humidifier in position "1",:

Room temperature: 22 ° C (72 ° F),
Room humidity: 39%
Mask air temperature: 23,8ºC
Humidity mask output: 65.5%


Tonight I experienced with my DreanStation the same condition, position 1, adaptive, is that moisture (65%) which penetrates through the nose and not the 35% that would say those tables.

I have to tell you something, my nasal mask having no leakt "0%"

I would say that this would be my limit in place the humidifier, no more than position 1

[Image: LEke4T7.jpg]
Post Reply Post Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  New ASV Dreamstation help chicken 4 93 7 hours ago
Last Post: Sleeprider
  x1, x2, x3... Mask Type Quick Reference? [Dreamstation] Sheepish 4 130 Yesterday, 09:11 AM
Last Post: Sheepish
  [Treatment] Doctor wont raise settings higher... what now? sw33ttsunade 34 1,203 10-19-2017, 04:14 PM
Last Post: SarcasticDave94
  Help with comfort settings Phillips DreamStation Annie66 7 218 10-19-2017, 03:55 PM
Last Post: KSMatthew
  Resistance checking heated air hose...? S.L. Ping Beauty 3 120 10-17-2017, 10:09 AM
Last Post: pholynyk
  Noisy DreamStation BandMom 46 14,177 10-15-2017, 09:31 PM
Last Post: Cbarrios
  Dreamstation heated hose temp repair fix Corvette817 11 405 10-14-2017, 08:14 AM
Last Post: Sleeprider

Forum Jump:

New Posts   Today's Posts




About Apnea Board

Apnea Board is an educational web site designed to empower Sleep Apnea patients.

For any more information, please use our contact form.