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#31
National Sleep Awareness Week: Cell phones, laptops, iPads and other devices are keeping us up at night

If you’re among 43 percent of Americans who rarely or never get a good night’s sleep during the week, an electronic device you’ve welcomed into your bed might be to blame, according to a recent National Sleep Foundation survey.

And it’s not just that you’re propped up in bed working overtime on your laptop, or checking for last-minute project updates with the company-issued Blackberry. Even if you’re playing iPad games or watching television in hopes of forgetting work, the bright screens of these devices are likely stimulating your brain in a way that interferes with sleep, experts say.

"Artificial light exposure between dusk and the time we go to bed at night suppresses release of the sleep-promoting hormone melatonin,” according to Charles Czeisler, who directs sleep medicine at Harvard Medical School and its affiliate Brigham and Women's Hospital. Using electronics right before bed also can make us more alert and shift circadian rhythms to a later hour—making it more difficult to fall asleep, notes Czeisler, among experts whose comments were included in a report on the foundation’s annual Sleep in America Poll. “Invasion of such alerting technologies into the bedroom may contribute to the high proportion of respondents who reported that they routinely get less sleep than they need," he said.

In the survey, released Monday at the start of the foundation’s National Sleep Awareness Week, 95 percent of respondents reported using some sort of electronic device in the hour before they hoped to nod off to sleep. That hour, according to sleep experts, is critical wind-down time that should be devoted to relaxing pursuits that would support a restful night’s sleep.

Experts further observed that interactive technology use, such as playing a video game, chatting with friends on Facebook or exchanging text messages, had a greater sleep-delaying effect than passively watching television or listening to music. For younger generations, 67 percent (ages 19 to 29) and 72 percent (ages 13-18) of whom reported sleeping with their cell phones, being awakened by late-night text messages only exacerbates a phenomenon that experts say may have serious consequences for physical health, cognitive development and general well-being.

shut the phones off and the laptop at least a half hour before you go to bed,” he said.



MAKE ROOM FOR SLEEP

In addition to the effects of technology use on sleep, the survey also looked at how our bedrooms can hinder or support good sleep.

Experts have long suggested avoiding exercise, big meals and spicy foods in the hour before bedtime. As well, we’ve been cautioned against having caffeinated beverages or even chocolate late in the day. And while wine, beer or cocktails can help with relaxation, they can also keep us awake at night, says Cerrone. “Once you metabolize that alcohol, it acts like a stimulant.”


When sleep experts talk about our bedroom conditions, they often use the term “sleep hygiene.” Here are some suggestions on how sleeping clean can help ensure more productive rest.

No distractions: Clutter, noise, light pollution and a room that is too hot or cold can all disturb rest. Create a comfortable sleeping area that is free of such sleep stealers. Exposure to light during sleeping hours is of particular concern as it has been found to interfere with melatonin production and linked to health issues ranging from weight gain to cancer.

Don’t work in bed: Treat your bed as a sanctuary. Experts recommend using it only for sleeping and sex so that it is associated with rest and pleasure. Youngsters should be encouraged to avoid doing their homework or using electronic devices in bed.

If you are not sleepy at bedtime or find yourself still awake 20 minutes after repose, get up and do something relaxing by soft light until you’re drowsy. If worries keep you awake, set aside time each evening to release them. Try using a “worry book” to write out your troubles and possible solutions. Then vow to take action, stop worrying and get to sleep.

Bed linens: Using light, comfortable bedding and garments with an appealing, freshly laundered scent is an effective sleep aid for some.
Relaxation ritual: Daily routines can help adjust the body’s inner clock. Along with keeping a regular bedtime, think of preparing for bed as a pleasant end-of-day ritual. To encourage good rest, take a warm bath, enjoy a cup of caffeine-free tea, exchange massages with your partner, listen to soothing music or enjoy a good book.

No-nap policy: According to the sleep poll, 44 percent of all respondents and 53 percent of teens take naps to cope with insufficient sleep. But napping can actually be counterproductive as it throws off circadian rhythms, resulting in a vicious cycle of unrest. If you must visit your bed before nighttime, experts recommend keeping it under an hour and doing so before 3 pm.

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#32
Thank you Me50 for this information.
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#33
missy d - I think your acidosis is not new, that you had it all along, from apnea. you just know about it now.

good luck controlling the urge to get stuff done while you are waiting to be sleepy enough to 'conk out'. you'll see I do something similar - get up after 3 or 4 hours of sleep and 'play' awhile before going back to bed.

QAL
Dedicated to QALity sleep.
You'll note I am listed as an Advisory Member. I am honored to be listed as such. See the fine print - Advisory Members as a group provide advice and suggestions to Apnea Board administrators and staff concerning Apnea Board operation and administrative policies. Membership in the Advisory Member group should not be understood as in any way implying medical expertise or qualification for advising Sleep Apnea patients concerning their treatment.
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#34
A quick pointer on the Airfit P10. Spreading the straps apart over the crown of your head makes it looser. Keeping the straps together in the back is tight.

Sleep Hygiene: Basic Guidelines (original article link) How many of these rules do you break every night?

What is a good sleep environment?
•Dark. Avoid lights, including night-lights. Keep the windows covered with blinds or curtains.
•Cool. Keep the temperature of your sleep environment cool enough to necessitate blankets for warmth.
•Quiet. Falling asleep and staying asleep is much easier if your environment is quiet. Use earplugs or a "white noise machine" if you cannot control the noise level in your sleep environment.
•Comfortable. Make sure you are sleeping on a comfortable mattress. A good mattress will support your back and will not leave you stiff and sore in the morning.

What is a good night of sleep?
•An uninterrupted sleep
•A refreshing sleep
•A deep sleep
•A length of time that works for you personally (the average adult needs 7.5 to 8 hours per night).

What will stop you from having a good night sleep?
•Consuming alcohol before bed. Alcohol may make it easier to fall asleep but it is at the cost of quality. Alcohol fragments your sleep, so you will not feel well rested even after a full night in dreamland.
•Certain medications. Some medications have side effects associated with insomnia. This is also the case for certain herbal remedies. Make sure to read the accompanying informational material and to consult your doctor or pharmacist!

What should you do to fall asleep easily?
•Have a bedtime ritual. This sends a cue to your body that it is time to settle down and fall asleep. A ritual does not have to be a long process and can be as simple as brushing your teeth and reading for 15 minutes.
•Keep a regular sleeping pattern. This allows your body's biological clock to take care of your ability to fall asleep and insures that you will be alert during the appropriate times of the day. One way to set your biological clock is to sit in the direct sun for 15 minutes right after you wake up in the morning. This prompts your body to tune in to the time of day.
•Have a light snack before bed. This will let you sleep soundly though the night without waking up from hunger pangs. Be careful though, eating a heavy meal before going to bed will make it difficult to fall asleep.
•Unwind earlier in the evening. Take the time early in the evening to relax your body and mind. Falling asleep can be almost impossible if your mind is racing-working through problems, weighing decisions and reviewing the day past or upcoming. A calm, clear mind is necessary for a relaxed body.
•Take a warm bath before going to bed. Warm baths raise your body's temperature. After the bath your body cools off and this cooling is what makes you sleepy.

What will impede the transition to sleep?
•Staying up too late. By staying up to late you are liable to get a "second wind" which will make it difficult for you to fall asleep even if it is late.
•Eating a large or heavy meal before bed. Heartburn, indigestion, and the need to urinate are counterproductive and end up disturbing your sleep.
•Doing things other than sleeping in bed (watching TV, working, etc.). If you engage in activities other than sleep or sex in bed, your brain will cease to recognize cues indicating that bed is the place for sleep.
•Having caffeine before bed. Caffeine is a stimulant that keeps you awake.
•Cigarette smoking. The nicotine found in cigarettes is a stimulant and will interfere with your body's ability to fall asleep.
•Exercising directly before bedtime. Exercise is healthy and can be very helpful if you do it several hours before going to sleep. Don't exercise just before bedtime since the natural high produced from exercise will inhibit your ability to fall asleep immediately.
•Forcing yourself to fall asleep. If you can't fall asleep after 30 minutes, it is wise to get up and do something that is not stimulating. Forcing yourself to lie there will only frustrate you and take you even farther from your goal of sleep.
•Daytime naps. Avoid daytime naps because they stagger your body's biological rhythm. By taking naps, you might not be tired at bedtime and this will encourage you to stay up later. If you don't go to bed at a reasonable hour, you might feel tired the next day and opt for another daytime nap, which establishes a vicious cycle. If napping is necessary, sleep for less than 1 hour before 3 pm.
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#35
Quote:I know the answer to my insomnia is probably just going to bed earlier, but I still have the issue with waking up frequently. I appreciate anything you can share with me..good or bad. I need to get this under control now!!

Hi Dawn,

When you go to bed earlier, what time is that? And when you say you waked up frequently, are you able to get back to sleep unlike when you go to bed at 3am and if so, how many hours do you sleep? Any improvement in sleep quality even a little bit or is it pretty much the same as when you go to bed at 3am? Sorry for all the questions but I am just trying to get a sense of what your issues are.

By the way, when you see your doctor later this month, you might want to ask him if light therapy would be helpful regarding your sleep issues in case he thinks you have a circadian rhythm problem that could be addressed by this.

Hang in there.

49er
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#36
(07-20-2015, 05:18 AM)quiescence at last Wrote: missy d - I think your acidosis is not new, that you had it all along, from apnea. you just know about it now.

good luck controlling the urge to get stuff done while you are waiting to be sleepy enough to 'conk out'. you'll see I do something similar - get up after 3 or 4 hours of sleep and 'play' awhile before going back to bed.

QAL

QAL,

You're probably right the acidosis. I think I'm giving up the late night activities and see if that helps me sleep better.

Thanks,
Dawn
(07-20-2015, 06:54 AM)Sleeprider Wrote: A quick pointer on the Airfit P10. Spreading the straps apart over the crown of your head makes it looser. Keeping the straps together in the back is tight.

Sleep Hygiene: Basic Guidelines (original article link) How many of these rules do you break every night?

What is a good sleep environment?
•Dark. Avoid lights, including night-lights. Keep the windows covered with blinds or curtains.
•Cool. Keep the temperature of your sleep environment cool enough to necessitate blankets for warmth.
•Quiet. Falling asleep and staying asleep is much easier if your environment is quiet. Use earplugs or a "white noise machine" if you cannot control the noise level in your sleep environment.
•Comfortable. Make sure you are sleeping on a comfortable mattress. A good mattress will support your back and will not leave you stiff and sore in the morning.

What is a good night of sleep?
•An uninterrupted sleep
•A refreshing sleep
•A deep sleep
•A length of time that works for you personally (the average adult needs 7.5 to 8 hours per night).

What will stop you from having a good night sleep?
•Consuming alcohol before bed. Alcohol may make it easier to fall asleep but it is at the cost of quality. Alcohol fragments your sleep, so you will not feel well rested even after a full night in dreamland.
•Certain medications. Some medications have side effects associated with insomnia. This is also the case for certain herbal remedies. Make sure to read the accompanying informational material and to consult your doctor or pharmacist!

What should you do to fall asleep easily?
•Have a bedtime ritual. This sends a cue to your body that it is time to settle down and fall asleep. A ritual does not have to be a long process and can be as simple as brushing your teeth and reading for 15 minutes.
•Keep a regular sleeping pattern. This allows your body's biological clock to take care of your ability to fall asleep and insures that you will be alert during the appropriate times of the day. One way to set your biological clock is to sit in the direct sun for 15 minutes right after you wake up in the morning. This prompts your body to tune in to the time of day.
•Have a light snack before bed. This will let you sleep soundly though the night without waking up from hunger pangs. Be careful though, eating a heavy meal before going to bed will make it difficult to fall asleep.
•Unwind earlier in the evening. Take the time early in the evening to relax your body and mind. Falling asleep can be almost impossible if your mind is racing-working through problems, weighing decisions and reviewing the day past or upcoming. A calm, clear mind is necessary for a relaxed body.
•Take a warm bath before going to bed. Warm baths raise your body's temperature. After the bath your body cools off and this cooling is what makes you sleepy.

What will impede the transition to sleep?
•Staying up too late. By staying up to late you are liable to get a "second wind" which will make it difficult for you to fall asleep even if it is late.
•Eating a large or heavy meal before bed. Heartburn, indigestion, and the need to urinate are counterproductive and end up disturbing your sleep.
•Doing things other than sleeping in bed (watching TV, working, etc.). If you engage in activities other than sleep or sex in bed, your brain will cease to recognize cues indicating that bed is the place for sleep.
•Having caffeine before bed. Caffeine is a stimulant that keeps you awake.
•Cigarette smoking. The nicotine found in cigarettes is a stimulant and will interfere with your body's ability to fall asleep.
•Exercising directly before bedtime. Exercise is healthy and can be very helpful if you do it several hours before going to sleep. Don't exercise just before bedtime since the natural high produced from exercise will inhibit your ability to fall asleep immediately.
•Forcing yourself to fall asleep. If you can't fall asleep after 30 minutes, it is wise to get up and do something that is not stimulating. Forcing yourself to lie there will only frustrate you and take you even farther from your goal of sleep.
•Daytime naps. Avoid daytime naps because they stagger your body's biological rhythm. By taking naps, you might not be tired at bedtime and this will encourage you to stay up later. If you don't go to bed at a reasonable hour, you might feel tired the next day and opt for another daytime nap, which establishes a vicious cycle. If napping is necessary, sleep for less than 1 hour before 3 pm.

Thanks Sleeprider.
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#37
(07-20-2015, 08:58 AM)49er Wrote:
Quote:I know the answer to my insomnia is probably just going to bed earlier, but I still have the issue with waking up frequently. I appreciate anything you can share with me..good or bad. I need to get this under control now!!

Hi Dawn,

When you go to bed earlier, what time is that? And when you say you waked up frequently, are you able to get back to sleep unlike when you go to bed at 3am and if so, how many hours do you sleep? Any improvement in sleep quality even a little bit or is it pretty much the same as when you go to bed at 3am? Sorry for all the questions but I am just trying to get a sense of what your issues are.

By the way, when you see your doctor later this month, you might want to ask him if light therapy would be helpful regarding your sleep issues in case he thinks you have a circadian rhythm problem that could be addressed by this.

Hang in there.

49er

I haven't tried going to bed earlier so I don't know. I was just saying I know that an earlier bedtime is probably part of the solution. Especially if my body is telling me at 11pm it's tired, but I push through it, and in the end am not going to bed until 4am.
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#38
if you have a tv, laptop/computer/smartphone in your bedroom, take them out. If you need a phone in case of an emergency, don't touch it when you are supposed to sleep unless there is an emergency....fire, health issue, break in.....those are emergencies.

get a white noise machine or a fan if you need noise to sleep.

Cover your windows so your room is dark.

Keep your room cool.

If your body says it is tired at 11 then get ready for bed at 10:30 so you are under the covers at 11.

Then read the rest of the two posts from me and Sleeprider that are almost identical. Print one of your choosing and put it by your bed to remind you of things to do when you can't sleep.

And a big thing is stay away from soda or anything else with caffeine in it and any stimulation (exercise) a few hours before you go to bed.
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#39
Quote:I haven't tried going to bed earlier so I don't know. I was just saying I know that an earlier bedtime is probably part of the solution. Especially if my body is telling me at 11pm it's tired, but I push through it, and in the end am not going to bed until 4am.

Ok, this is great news because you haven't tried this yet and have no failures to deal with.Smile Obviously, you can make up your own mind but personally, starting to get ready for a 11pm bedtime at 10:30pm wouldn't be enough time for me. But you're a youngster compared to me so you may not need as much time. Smile

49er
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#40
mzdawn74,
I used to be a night owl, like you (before CPAP), was tired around 11 but when I went to bed, I would lay there for hours and finally get up around 3, then go back to bed a few hours later. I was lucky to average 2 hours of sleep. I also suffered a lot of anxiety.

I know from experience that you can't go on that way. I finally changed my habits. Stopped watching TV and or playing on my I Pad after 9pm. Started to get ready for bed and was actually in bed by 10. I never up to that point took anything to help with falling asleep, but started on Melatonin. It did help, but it is not for long term use. It was just enough to help me get into a new habit of sleep. Now I'm pretty much on the same schedule every night. Lights out at 10pm and up by 6 or 7.

Only you can do this for yourself. We can give you tons of advice, but in the end you have to make the decision to change for your own healths sake.


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