Hello Guest, Welcome to Apnea Board !
As a guest, you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use.
To post a message, you must create a free account using a valid email address.

or Create an Account


New Posts   Today's Posts

Ear drainage when using CPAP
#1
I'm sorry - I'm not trying to be gross, but does anybody know if there's any connection between using CPAP and mild ear drainage?

It happens to me sometimes, but only since I started CPAP therapy just over a month ago.
This morning I woke up on my left side and I could feel liquid trying to run out of my left ear. Not a lot, but enough to feel like when water drains out of your ear hours after swimming, and tickles. There was no liquid on the pillow or anything, but my ear canal felt wet. Where would this be coming from? Pretty sure the sinuses and Eustachian tube are on the other side of the ear drum.
[Image: tz8toniko.gif]
Post Reply Post Reply
#2
you should bring this up with your doctor - it should not be happening. yes there is an eardrum between e.tubes and external canal! I have heard of (and experienced) cpap exacerbating ear pressure issues, but this is more than that.
هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه
Tongue Suck Technique for prevention of mouth breathing:
  • Place your tongue behind your front teeth on the roof of your mouth
  • let your tongue fill the space between the upper molars
  • gently suck to form a light vacuum
Practising during the day can help you to keep it at night

هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه
Post Reply Post Reply
#3
(04-25-2016, 11:19 PM)toniko Wrote: I'm sorry - I'm not trying to be gross, but does anybody know if there's any connection between using CPAP and mild ear drainage?

It happens to me sometimes, but only since I started CPAP therapy just over a month ago.
This morning I woke up on my left side and I could feel liquid trying to run out of my left ear. Not a lot, but enough to feel like when water drains out of your ear hours after swimming, and tickles. There was no liquid on the pillow or anything, but my ear canal felt wet. Where would this be coming from? Pretty sure the sinuses and Eustachian tube are on the other side of the ear drum.

Let me know if you find out anything. I have had this problem for years, comes and goes with the seasons. Usually involves a buildup of fluid behind the eardrum. Has led to inner ear infections. Some will say this can't happen, but, it does.

Post Reply Post Reply


#4
(04-25-2016, 11:19 PM)toniko Wrote: I'm sorry - I'm not trying to be gross, but does anybody know if there's any connection between using CPAP and mild ear drainage?

It happens to me sometimes, but only since I started CPAP therapy just over a month ago.
This morning I woke up on my left side and I could feel liquid trying to run out of my left ear. Not a lot, but enough to feel like when water drains out of your ear hours after swimming, and tickles. There was no liquid on the pillow or anything, but my ear canal felt wet. Where would this be coming from? Pretty sure the sinuses and Eustachian tube are on the other side of the ear drum.

What you describe sounds like ear wax draining. It normally does not drain like that but if you spend a lot of the night on one side with that ear against the pillow, the ear canal heats up and the wax liquefies and starts to drain. I am not sure why you think the drainage is from your middle ear but there would have to be hole in your eardrum. You might have your doc (or a nurse) check your eardrum just to be sure.

Best Regards,

PaytonA

Admin Note:
PaytonA passed away in September 2017
Click HERE to read his Memorial Thread

~ Rest in Peace ~
Post Reply Post Reply
#5
(04-26-2016, 01:20 PM)PaytonA Wrote:
(04-25-2016, 11:19 PM)toniko Wrote: I'm sorry - I'm not trying to be gross, but does anybody know if there's any connection between using CPAP and mild ear drainage?

It happens to me sometimes, but only since I started CPAP therapy just over a month ago.
This morning I woke up on my left side and I could feel liquid trying to run out of my left ear. Not a lot, but enough to feel like when water drains out of your ear hours after swimming, and tickles. There was no liquid on the pillow or anything, but my ear canal felt wet. Where would this be coming from? Pretty sure the sinuses and Eustachian tube are on the other side of the ear drum.

What you describe sounds like ear wax draining. It normally does not drain like that but if you spend a lot of the night on one side with that ear against the pillow, the ear canal heats up and the wax liquefies and starts to drain. I am not sure why you think the drainage is from your middle ear but there would have to be hole in your eardrum. You might have your doc (or a nurse) check your eardrum just to be sure.

Best Regards,

PaytonA

Thank you for the answers, everyone.
Actually, this here sounds like it may be the issue I'm having. I don't really believe it's coming from the inner ear, but it felt like a lot of liquid to be just wax to me, so I was worried about where it might be coming from. I've had a perforated ear drum before and it really hurt, and there was blood, but this is nothing like that, and there is no pain.
It must just be "melted" ear wax.... I will talk to my doctor about it anyway though, when I see her next. Just to cover all bases.
[Image: tz8toniko.gif]
Post Reply Post Reply
#6
Toniko Wrote:Thank you for the answers, everyone.
Actually, this here sounds like it may be the issue I'm having. I don't really believe it's coming from the inner ear, but it felt like a lot of liquid to be just wax to me, so I was worried about where it might be coming from. I've had a perforated ear drum before and it really hurt, and there was blood, but this is nothing like that, and there is no pain.
It must just be "melted" ear wax.... I will talk to my doctor about it anyway though, when I see her next. Just to cover all bases.

Hello - that sounds like a good idea. And if is not wax then you might want to ask for a referral to an Ear Nose and Throat specialist. I understand that non-wax fluid leaking from an ear should be checked out properly, particularly if you've had a perforated ear drum in the past.
Best wishes
........................................................................................

My current pressures. Auto-ASV EPAP 11-15. PS 3-10

Post Reply Post Reply


#7
Wink 
I have tubes in both ears and my CPAP causes MAJOR ear drainage. I have also had recurrent ear infections since I began using my CPAP about 11 months ago.  The drainage had been chronic for nearly nine months. 

 My ENT doctor had no idea what was causing the drainage so I researched online and found a number of reports linking CPAP and drainage, especially with tube wearers.  I decided to test for myself - 4 days without CPAP and the drainage had resolved.  I then began CPAP again and in three days both ears were draining.  Then off CPAP and drainage quit, then on and drainage began again. 

I have been on CPAP for two days then and off 2 days for about a month now which is controlling the drainage; however, that is not a good solution as I struggle with apnea on the nights I don't wear the CPAP.  I have an appointment with my ENT tomorrow to see if he has suggestions on how to handle this dilemma.  

 My hearing has become much worse over the last 6 months or so and my ENT is sending me to a specialist for evaluation to see if I need cochlear implants. (I think there is a connection between the increasing hearing loss and the CPAP use.)

PS - If I hear anything, I'll let you know. (LOL) Bigwink
Post Reply Post Reply
#8
Sam - I had a lot of ear trouble on CPAP until I began using a nasal spray of saline and xylitol. At frist I bought Xclear, but it's expensive so I found a recipe online and tweaked til I got it how I wanted it.

https://www.fauquierent.net/etd2.htm has a nice tutorial on how to use nasal sprays to best help with Eustachian tube dysfunction (clogged ears leading to repeated infections)

as a bonus, since I began using the xylitol/saline every night almost 3 years ago now, I don't get sick, or if I do it's gone quickly and I have had zero secondary infections. I do not make antibodies to the most common respiratory bacteria (pneumococcus) at all, so that is actually a minor miracle.
هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه
Tongue Suck Technique for prevention of mouth breathing:
  • Place your tongue behind your front teeth on the roof of your mouth
  • let your tongue fill the space between the upper molars
  • gently suck to form a light vacuum
Practising during the day can help you to keep it at night

هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه
Post Reply Post Reply
#9
Thank you for that link, DariaVader. I'm going to give that technique a try and see if it helps.
Post Reply Post Reply


#10
(12-10-2017, 06:41 PM)Sam Wallis Wrote: I have tubes in both ears and my CPAP causes MAJOR ear drainage. I have also had recurrent ear infections since I began using my CPAP about 11 months ago.  The drainage had been chronic for nearly nine months. 

 My ENT doctor had no idea what was causing the drainage so I researched online and found a number of reports linking CPAP and drainage, especially with tube wearers.  I decided to test for myself - 4 days without CPAP and the drainage had resolved.  I then began CPAP again and in three days both ears were draining.  Then off CPAP and drainage quit, then on and drainage began again. 

I have been on CPAP for two days then and off 2 days for about a month now which is controlling the drainage; however, that is not a good solution as I struggle with apnea on the nights I don't wear the CPAP.  I have an appointment with my ENT tomorrow to see if he has suggestions on how to handle this dilemma.  

 My hearing has become much worse over the last 6 months or so and my ENT is sending me to a specialist for evaluation to see if I need cochlear implants. (I think there is a connection between the increasing hearing loss and the CPAP use.)

PS - If I hear anything, I'll let you know. (LOL) Bigwink

This is really an issue for your ENT considering both chronic drainage and hearing loss.  CPAP does cause an increase in pressure in the eustachian tubes, and tubes or eardrum perforation can be a contraindication to CPAP use. Persistent drainage may suggest an underlying problem or infection that needs treatment, and hearing loss is always a significant concern. This needs to be discussed with your doctor to ensure the drainage is not from a treatable cause or something that requires his attention. If "he had no idea what was causing the drainage", then that might require further investigation or referral to someone interested in the answer.  A drainage is not normal, and you should not accept his "I dunno" explanation.

You should pursue a second opinion, and may want to consider treatment alternatives, ranging from reducing pressure, including use of bilevel pressure, or even a surgical solution to your obstructive apnea.  Many members have improved results with lower pressure and the use of a soft cervical collar to maintain airway alignment.  Lots of options, but I think you need to first follow-up on the unhelpful and unacceptable non-diagnosis of the root problem.
Post Reply Post Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
Question Eustaschian tube surgery for ear drainage Sam Wallis 15 292 01-09-2018, 03:27 PM
Last Post: Sleeprider
  [Health] New here... nasal drainage issues Fir.na.tine 5 271 09-22-2017, 09:42 PM
Last Post: HalfAsleep

Forum Jump:

New Posts   Today's Posts




About Apnea Board

Apnea Board is an educational web site designed to empower Sleep Apnea patients.

For any more information, please use our contact form.