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[Equipment] Oh no... another thread about filters.
#11
(06-23-2013, 08:25 PM)JJJ Wrote: I have no more faith in Resmed OEM filters than third party filters. I doubt they did much scientific testing when they selected the material they use.

Your comment about dirty filters doing a better job than clean ones is a good point. But does a really dirty filter actually lower the pressure? Wouldn't the machine compensate? I assume the machine has a pressure sensor that the software responds to in order to adjust the motor speed, but I have no clue where it might be located.

I agree, the machine would compensate until the buildup and pressure drop is really bad.

I disagree about 3rd party filters. They may not have put much "science" into it at ResMed, but they have lots of practical experience with whatever filter material they choose. There are BIG differences between different filter types. Some mostly keep out big things like bugs, some filter very fine particles. Some have large pressure drops, some have very small drops. Some clog easily, some are more clog resistant.
Get the free SleepyHead software here.
Useful links.
Click here for information on the main alternative to CPAP.
If it's midnight and a DME tells you it's dark outside, go and check it yourself.
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#12
(06-23-2013, 08:45 PM)Paptillian Wrote: Do the hypoallergenic filters have any electrostatic properties like furnace filters do for attracting airborne particles (in addition to passively trapping them)?

The electrostatic properties are well known for vacuuming your wallet.
The term hypoallergenic does not mean it is a better filter.
It only means that there are no known allergy causing materials in its make up.

Wheee!

I think this term is often confused with HEPA filters.
A true bacteria / viral stopping filter would be so restricting that it would have to be the size of a trash can and have a really large noisy blower.

How do I know this?
Because I own a Honeywell #50250. (you may google that for a picture)
Your mild mannered CPAP machine just hasn't got the moxie to to pull air through a monster like that.
Your CPAP filter is about as good as an N95 respirator filter and that will stop big things like dust and bugs from getting in the works, getting chopped up and blown down your hose or fouling your pressure sensors. (God forbid) .
Isn't that delighful? Smile

I check mine a couple times a month and wash/replace it on a regular basis when it gets looking grungy.

Cheers!

=^.^=
"With ordinary talent and extraordinary perseverance, all things are attainable." - Thomas Foxwell Buxton

Cool
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#13
(06-25-2013, 09:11 PM)Shastzi Wrote: A true bacteria / viral stopping filter would be so restricting that it would have to be the size of a trash can and have a really large noisy blower.

True, but that is significant overkill. The smallest pollen is about 3 microns in size, and can get as large as a few hundred microns. Bacteria are about 0.3 microns and larger, and viruses go down to 0.003 microns.

Actually, N95 filters are rated to remove 95% of particles 0.3 microns in size or larger, so one of those should remove all airborne pollen.
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#14
(06-25-2013, 09:11 PM)Shastzi Wrote: The electrostatic properties are well known for vacuuming your wallet.
The term hypoallergenic does not mean it is a better filter.
It only means that there are no known allergy causing materials in its make up.

I'm thinking there's got to be some truth to it or else they'd be falsely advertising. The attached screenshot was taken from the clinician manual for the S9 AutoSet.

If what they claim in that screenshot is true, then I'm curious to know if the non-OEM hypoallergenic filters also have those properties.


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   
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#15
Amen to this! I figured out this trick when I realized I had some extra after making a new filter for my home AC. Works perfectly!

(06-21-2013, 02:36 PM)Shastzi Wrote: I have found that the 'magical filtering material' is available in bulk sheets 3' X 4' for just a few dollars.
I can cut my own out with a pair of scissors and also wash them until they become unusable.
There is no reason to pay $6 for more for a dinky piece of plastic foam.

I don't mind people making a profit but selling a cheap item at horrendous markup is annoying.

Cheers!
And don't take any wooden nickles!

Smile

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#16
(06-30-2013, 10:01 PM)Paptillian Wrote:
(06-25-2013, 09:11 PM)Shastzi Wrote: The electrostatic properties are well known for vacuuming your wallet.
The term hypoallergenic does not mean it is a better filter.
It only means that there are no known allergy causing materials in its make up.

I'm thinking there's got to be some truth to it or else they'd be falsely advertising. The attached screenshot was taken from the clinician manual for the S9 AutoSet.

If what they claim in that screenshot is true, then I'm curious to know if the non-OEM hypoallergenic filters also have those properties.


Well, Paptillian.
(mildly disagree)
There are lies, damn lies and advertisements.
Keep in mind that the cigarette industry used to tout thier product thusly:

"You'll even breathe easier smoking [X brand]!"
*koff-koff*
Yah, right.
Case in point: "All advertisements are lies until PROVEN otherwise"

For all we know the hypoallergenic filters could be made from New York City toxic sludge since there is no laws requiring disclosure for CPAP filters.
(sobering pause. Yes. NYC did try to sell toxic waste once for use as planting soil.)
Knowing this and keeping in mind the filter us only there to keep dust out of the sensors, just use the cheapest and best thing that you know will work.
IE: Switching from Dial Soap to Dove will gain you nothing (soap is still soap) but Dove will empty your wallet quicker.

Cheers!
"With ordinary talent and extraordinary perseverance, all things are attainable." - Thomas Foxwell Buxton

Cool
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#17
I have 3 dogs and I change my filters every 2 weeks. They are not very dirty when I change them but I can see some dirt on them so I change them. I am allowed 2 filters every month so I just change them every 2 weeks as a course of habit.
my DME said they don't carry the hypoallergenic filters
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#18
If you put your CPAP on the floor you might find that the filter has added a half-inch of dog fur to it's filter. I figure that just makes it filter better, right?

OMM
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