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"First" Conversation with the DME
#1
So my wife got a call at work that the DME was sending a respiratory therapist over to deliver a machine this afternoon. Do I trust that this will be a good choice? NOPE!

I called the DME offices and asked what make and model will be delivered at today's appointment. I was pleasantly surprised they told me. "We are bringing a Philps Respironics DS560T11."

I replied, "well that's kind of an outdated machine that was discontinued over a year ago". The nice guy answering the phone asked me to hold while he talked to the respiratory department. Upon coming back, he said the dreamstation was out of stock. I told him our preference is for teh Resmed Airsense 10 Autoset. He said, well, we do have those in stock.

So I expect we will get the newer machine. I am posting this because I think so many new CPAP users just let the DME pick for them. In this case we would have gotten a 2-year old "new stock" machine...a perfectly good CPAP for 2014, but one that seems out of place "new" in 2017. It is so important for consumers to know what they are getting and to stand up for it before the delivery occurs.
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#2
In case you missed it, we live in Murrysville, PA where Respironics are designed and manufactured for the world. Our DME is out of stock on the current Dreamstaton and we might be expected to accept the model discontinued in 2015? Please draw your own conclusions.
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#3
I found it ironic that they were out of stock on the Dreamstation when the company is right down the way. I don't think they were really taking advantage of you however. The 560 auto is a good machine and the Dreamstation is simply an outer redesign - the algorithm is the same. The main advantage of the Dreamstation is that the humidifier is better for someone with large or restricted finger movement and/or unable to bend.

However, I DO agree that patients need to realize that they need to shop medical devices like any other consumer product. Know what the options are before you take delivery because you may not be able to change them after the fact.
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#4
I agree the 60 series is a very good machine, but like any discontinued model, its pricing reflects the fact it is discontinued. Our insurance won't get a discount for giving us a less expensive, discontinued machine. So it's not the quality, but the principle of the matter to me. For Auto CPAP, I like what Resmed is doing better, mostly for the EPR algorithm vs A-Flex. The design is more compact and the carry case is presentable in an airport. Dreamstation is a good unit, and has the advantage of being 12-volt, but is awkward in size and has issues with the screen angle and brightness. So currently, I think they have the advantage. I hope Philips Respironics will consider the consumer in the next round of design. Unfortunately, I think they are extremely isolated from the end-user and this is currently reflected in their designs and marketing.
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#5
Are they actually designed and manufactured in Murrysville PA?
Often a National HQ has zero stock of their product.

Like ResMed has an HQ in San Diego. They are/were big in Australia; but my S9 was made in Singapore.
INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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#6
Sleeprider,
I agree with your assessment of the PR 60 series, although I like my machine and it works great, but the AFlex feature leaves a lot to be desired. I don't believe that's been improved upon with the DreamStation.

When my 5 years is up, and I qualify for another machine, I will most likely look at a ResMed. I believe the ResMed's EPR feature and algorithm are better.

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INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.




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#7
(01-03-2017, 01:20 PM)justMongo Wrote: Are they actually designed and manufactured in Murrysville PA?
Often a National HQ has zero stock of their product.

Like ResMed has an HQ in San Diego. They are/were big in Australia; but my S9 was made in Singapore.

Respironics was founded here, and when acquired by Philips the company had a headquarters, engineering and two manufacturing buildings within Murrysville and Lower Burrell Twp. I go by the offices and manufacturing buildings often right off Logan Ferry Road...we share the same zip code.
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#8
(01-03-2017, 01:56 PM)OpalRose Wrote: Sleeprider,
I agree with your assessment of the PR 60 series, although I like my machine and it works great, but the AFlex feature leaves a lot to be desired. I don't believe that's been improved upon with the DreamStation.

When my 5 years is up, and I qualify for another machine, I will most likely look at a ResMed. I believe the ResMed's EPR feature and algorithm are better.

Oddly enough, I'm brand-agnostic. While I really admire the auto CPAP implementation from Resmed, I prefer the Auto BiPAP implementation by Philips Respironics with full variable pressure support, however like other Philips auto machines, it is slow (conservative?) to increase pressure to address events. Going further up the line, the adaptive servo ventilator and ST lines appear to be better by Resmed. Again, we see dozens of cases here, and see their results and difficulties. People generally adapt easier to Resmed respirators or vice versa, and the backup rates seem to be much more effective. We have watched a lot of CA turn into hypopnea on a Respironics Auto SV Advanced, while a S9 Adapt, or Aircurve 10 ASV seemlessly turns those into full breaths.
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#9
Sleeprider,

Don't keep us in suspense! Which machine did the "DME fairy" deliver?
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#10
The DME fairy turns out to be a bald older gentleman that looks like someone I'd get along with well. She got a Airsense 10 Autoset and Airfit P10 For Her. The RT provided her with all the good information (knew his stuff), and even a copy of her sleep study. The sleep study had an interesting typo that showed she had a AHI of 94, but looking at the detail pages, it turns out to be 24, which made a lot more sense.

So, we're good to go. The DME didn't offer any resistance to our request for the different machine. I think it's just a matter that you need to know what you want, and make sure they know. I'm sure someone else will get the DS560.
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