Hello Guest, Welcome to Apnea Board !
As a guest, you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use.
To post a message, you must create a free account using a valid email address.

or Create an Account


New Posts   Today's Posts

Follow-Up about 95% Pressure Question
#1
So I posted a few weeks ago about my data and how a CPAP pressure would be calculated.

Well, I just got the compliance report that will be sent to the sleep doctor from the at home titration test and the stats were all within acceptable ranges.

If my median pressure over 30 days was 14.5, the 95% was 19.0 and the maximum 20.0, two questions:

(1) Would the CPAP pressure be close to 19?
(2) Would I be safe to say that I should mention to the doctor about a BiPAP?

Thanks!
Post Reply Post Reply
#2
If you had the following pressure readings during a sleep session: 8, 16, 9, 20, 12, 14, 18, 8, 10, and 12. The median would be 12 and the 95 percentile would be 19.1 (as I calculate it). The median is calculated by arranging the values in ascending order and the one in the middle (50 percentile) is the value of 12. The 19 @ 95 percentile means that 95% of all recorded values are below 19.

You are bumping the upper threshold of a CPAP at 20. Time, playing with your sleeping conditions, and weight loss may reduce the maximum pressure needed. BiPAPs are almost twice the price of an auto titration CPAP. Unless you have rich relatives or a real good insurance policy, I'd recommend that you try working with the one you have for a little bit longer.
______________________
Useful Links -or- When All Else Fails:
Posting SleepyHead Charts in 5 Easy Steps
Robysue's Beginner's Guide to Sleepyhead
Apnea Helpful Tips
Post Reply Post Reply
#3
(09-08-2015, 02:31 PM)ramblingasian Wrote: So I posted a few weeks ago about my data and how a CPAP pressure would be calculated.

Well, I just got the compliance report that will be sent to the sleep doctor from the at home titration test and the stats were all within acceptable ranges.

If my median pressure over 30 days was 14.5, the 95% was 19.0 and the maximum 20.0, two questions:

(1) Would the CPAP pressure be close to 19?
(2) Would I be safe to say that I should mention to the doctor about a BiPAP?

Thanks!

Yes, but that doesn't mean you need a bipap (yet). However, if your machine is closing in on 5 years, discuss with the doctor over that option. In my case, I've needed slightly higher pressures lately due to pollen and the western fires. After it rains, that night, I'm back down again. Look at your Sleepyhead data as well. If you are only briefly at 19 and you aren't having a lot of events, you really don't need a bipap as your machine can handle what you have already.

Now, my machine is currently set with an 8-12 range. I've had a few nights where its spending more time at 12, but only one night where I had increased events because it couldn't go higher. The single numbers give you an idea of what is up over time, but you can also see how LONG you are staying at that number more easily by looking at the daily sheets.

I'm still a beginner, but I'm starting to see how sleeping conditions can affect data day to day.
Post Reply Post Reply


#4
(09-08-2015, 03:20 PM)sgearhart Wrote: If you had the following pressure readings during a sleep session: 8, 16, 9, 20, 12, 14, 18, 8, 10, and 12. The median would be 12 and the 95 percentile would be 19.1 (as I calculate it). The median is calculated by arranging the values in ascending order and the one in the middle (50 percentile) is the value of 12. The 19 @ 95 percentile means that 95% of all recorded values are below 19.

You are bumping the upper threshold of a CPAP at 20. Time, playing with your sleeping conditions, and weight loss may reduce the maximum pressure needed. BiPAPs are almost twice the price of an auto titration CPAP. Unless you have rich relatives or a real good insurance policy, I'd recommend that you try working with the one you have for a little bit longer.

(09-08-2015, 03:46 PM)Mosquitobait Wrote: Yes, but that doesn't mean you need a bipap (yet). However, if your machine is closing in on 5 years, discuss with the doctor over that option. In my case, I've needed slightly higher pressures lately due to pollen and the western fires. After it rains, that night, I'm back down again. Look at your Sleepyhead data as well. If you are only briefly at 19 and you aren't having a lot of events, you really don't need a bipap as your machine can handle what you have already.

Now, my machine is currently set with an 8-12 range. I've had a few nights where its spending more time at 12, but only one night where I had increased events because it couldn't go higher. The single numbers give you an idea of what is up over time, but you can also see how LONG you are staying at that number more easily by looking at the daily sheets.

I'm still a beginner, but I'm starting to see how sleeping conditions can affect data day to day.

FYI: I'm in a titration test right now, so the machine is a loaner. I live in Canada, where due to government insurance, I will only have to pay a fixed amount for XPAP equipment. I'm just trying to become more informed about what equipment options I have so when I talk to my doctor I can have a proper conversation.
Post Reply Post Reply
#5
Ok, that totally makes sense.
Post Reply Post Reply
#6
Ramblinasian, in the U.S. the generally accepted rule is that when required CPAP pressure goes above 14 cmH2O a Bilevel is considered in order to provide greater exhale pressure relief and comfort. Some bilevel devices also have higher pressure capability. You should not hesitate to discuss the possibility of bilevel therapy, especially if you find the constant high pressure uncomfortable in any way, or if you're experiencing leaks or other problems.

CPAP pressure is usually set to the 90% pressure of an APAP trial, so you are still above a bilevel threshold, but not quite 19 cm for CPAP.
Post Reply Post Reply




Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Pressure at altitude vs. pressure at lower elevations...? S.L. Ping Beauty 6 55 7 minutes ago
Last Post: S.L. Ping Beauty
  [Equipment] Viscious cycle of increased pressure -> more leak -> response of more pressure 3mp0w3r 5 253 09-16-2017, 09:04 AM
Last Post: OpalRose
  Follow-Up Appt. with Doctor & Changing Own Settings rooy1960 10 837 08-09-2017, 08:13 AM
Last Post: SarcasticDave94
  Follow up- APAP noise Tahera11979 0 192 07-22-2017, 07:39 AM
Last Post: Tahera11979
  [Pressure] What is the theoritical correct pressure for a fixed pressure CPAP? Rcgop 13 939 05-14-2017, 09:00 PM
Last Post: ajack
  Compliance question. Do I need to have a follow up if I paid out of pocket? Piggles 7 493 02-06-2017, 05:19 PM
Last Post: Joe Fox
  Resmed S8 Autoset Vantage Pressure results question D.D. 3 448 01-26-2017, 09:29 PM
Last Post: trish6hundred

Forum Jump:

New Posts   Today's Posts




About Apnea Board

Apnea Board is an educational web site designed to empower Sleep Apnea patients.

For any more information, please use our contact form.