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Grid Down and Your CPAP
#1
Anyone given consideration for maintaining your CPAP usage in a grid down situation?
If not - why not?
If so - what are the options you have provided yourself?

Cheers from Texas.
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#2
I live in a large, reasonably metropolitan city and it is very rare to have the power out for long enough to be a problem for me. I'm also only moderately severe in my apnea.
If I slept without the CPAP, I'd do it on my side since I have data showing the issue is less extreme then.
                                                                                                                                                                                  
Please organize your SleeyHead screenshots like this.
I'm an epidemiologist, not a medical provider. 
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#3
There's a lot of folks with battery backups established. Do a search of the main forum for "camping" and you'll find most of the threads about the subject.

http://www.apneaboard.com/forums/Thread-...rum-Search
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#4
(02-25-2017, 06:57 PM)Beej Wrote: If I slept without the CPAP, I'd do it on my side since I have data showing the issue is less extreme then.

The data you have showing the issue as being less extreme if you sleep on your side is your own, or industry published data?

I ask because my home sleep test consisted of strapping a cigar box sized data recorder to my chest, which I contended(forcefully) would not allow a representative nights sleep, giving a falsley high reading, as I was more or less forced to sleep on my back.
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#5
From the University of Maryland Medical Center's Sleep Apnea education page, see the blue text below.

"The most effective treatment is continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). CPAP treatment includes using a machine and mask to blow air through your airway to keep it open. Studies show CPAP also reduces arterial stiffness.
Wearing dental appliances may help by pushing the lower jaw forward, keeping the tongue from blocking the airway, or a combination of both. These may be uncomfortable until you get used to them.
In severe cases, surgery may be needed. But most often, sleep apnea can be managed with CPAP and lifestyle changes.
Lifestyle changes that may help obstructive apnea include:
  • Losing weight. This may cause your sleep apnea to go away entirely.
  • Limiting your use of alcohol, antihistamines, or tranquilizers.
  • Getting treatment for allergies, colds, or sinus problems.
  • Gargling with salt water (without swallowing) to shrink your tonsils.
  • Developing regular sleep habits and making sure you get enough sleep at night.
  • Sleeping on your side rather than your back, or with your body elevated from the waist up. You can use foam wedges to raise your upper body. DO NOT use soft pillows, which tend to make apnea worse by pushing the chin toward the chest.
  • Using an air humidifier at night.
  • Not smoking and not exposing yourself to other irritants, such as dust or perfumes.
  • Raising the head of your bed by placing bricks under the headboard.
  • Exercising. Studies show regular exercise is associated with a lower risk of sleep apnea. Exercise also reduces sleepiness and improves quality of life among people who have the disorder."

Also, I have noted for myself, and on a few other posts of others, evidence that for some of us, side sleeping may reduce obstructive events. My numbers are better on my side. One person's sleep study showed back sleeping events were 7 times higher than when side sleeping. 
If you have obstructive events and is able to do so, sleeping on the side may help mitigate the problem, so its worth testing out for yourself.
                                                                                                                                                                                  
Please organize your SleeyHead screenshots like this.
I'm an epidemiologist, not a medical provider. 
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#6
Many thanks for that information.

My train of thought was, I do a sleep test with the box strapped to my chest.
The box, to a certain extent forces me to sleep on my back.
Back sleeping exacerbates the alleged Apnea, as you have explained.
I am therefore diagnosed with a level of Apnea far higher than had I been sleeping naturally, which in most cases would be on my stomach.
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#7
Hmn. I wonder if they could strap it on your back and test you that way. If/when you do another sleep study, maybe ask them that.
                                                                                                                                                                                  
Please organize your SleeyHead screenshots like this.
I'm an epidemiologist, not a medical provider. 
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#8
Good one, I like it. Dielaughing 

I would suggest that wherever you strap it, within reason Too-funny it will hardly be conducive to a good nights sleep.
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#9
For my sleep studies, the wires attached to long leads, which then connected to the box which connected to the recording devices.
                                                                                                                                                                                  
Please organize your SleeyHead screenshots like this.
I'm an epidemiologist, not a medical provider. 
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#10
I hadn't really thought much about battery backup because we have an automatic standby generator provided by the county (we just pay fuel). It looks rather like an air conditioner unit. Unfortunately, we will probably lose that when my disabled sibling goes into assisted living since although my Mom is 83, she is not at all frail. So, I think I'll have to look at battery options for my Airsense!

If you are in an area where there are frequent power outs AND you are on oxygen, you should seriously consider the automatic standby generator. The only reason why they switched us to this from a standard generator (takes them only 3 minutes to set it up) is because we are having frequent power outs due to the road construction down the street (widening of the collector street). We're lucky we don't have to pay for it, but alas, once bro isn't here, we no longer qualify for a free one.
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