Hello Guest, Welcome to Apnea Board !
As a guest, you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use.
To post a message, you must create a free account using a valid email address.

or Create an Account


New Posts   Today's Posts

Poll: Are you underweight, overweight or near your ideal body weight?
This poll is closed.
I am under my ideal body weight
1.01%
1 1.01%
I am at or near my ideal body weight (less than 10 pounds or 4.5 kilograms above ideal body weight)
21.21%
21 21.21%
I am overweight (more than 10 pounds or 4.5 kilograms above ideal body weight)
77.78%
77 77.78%
Total 99 vote(s) 100%
* You voted for this item. [Show Results]

[Health] Body Weight and Sleep Apnea - POLL
#21
Good-work

Great job Galactus, but now we know why you are so pissy! Too-funny

Best Regards,

PaytonA
Post Reply Post Reply
#22
At least you didn't say "Have a Snickers Bar you're not yourself when you're hungry".
If everyone thinks alike, then someone isn't thinking.
Everyone knows something, together we could know everything.
Post Reply Post Reply
#23
Smile[/size][/font][font=Arial][size=medium]
(10-23-2014, 08:44 AM)MAPnea Wrote: When in high school (which is the time we are supposedly at our "ideal weight") I was 5'10" tall and weighed 136 pounds. I ran track, played volleyball and walked everywhere I went. As an adult I started adding on weight after I turned 55. Not because I was sedentary, but because I was TIRED ALL THE TIME. I'd eat (mostly sugar and carbohydrates) just so I could "wake up" and "get up" and "get going" with my day. Frequent naps. Eventually I "topped out" at 185. Since being diagnosed with sleep apnea and getting on therapy, I've lost 25 pounds (in 2 years) without even trying! For me, I think treating my sleep apnea was the best "diet" ever.
:grin:

Dear MAPnea,
encouraging. Did you log your CPAP pressure over the 2 year weight loss period? Do you have before and after stats?
I am currently on a weight loss mission to see if it is possible to reduce CPAP usage to a level that it is possible to leave it at home when I am travelling. (I like to travel light). I am 1.78m (5'10") and started at 88kg and an average pressure of 7.7cm. I lost 5kg over 4 months and currently has an avg pressure of 6.5cm H2O.
Post Reply Post Reply


#24
(10-23-2014, 04:46 AM)DocWils Wrote: Well, when I was still a young resident, I weighed 57 kilos and all muscle (I am 180 cm tall). Now I am an old, wizened (but alas, not terribly wise) doc and 101 kilos (down from my all time high of 118) - so how did I essentially add another me in weight? Simple, really? I ATE HIM! How did I lose 17 kilos in a short time? I stopped eating so much. Garbage in/garbage out. Simple rule, yes? And I only started to snore when my weight passed the 89 kilo mark, so for sure this a weight related problem in my case. Not everyone is so lucky. Many Apnoea patients have the syndrome not from weight (or not only from weight) but from many other factors far less easy to deal with. And for them a remission is far harder to achieve. I am one of the lucky ones - the more weight I lose, the more my pressure needs lower, but a lot of people here simply will never have that sort of option. *sigh*

Dear DocWils,
do you have before and after CPAP stats (pressure etc) over the period 118 - 101 kg that you can share?
Post Reply Post Reply
#25
My start pressure was 18 fixed, I have since lost 100 and still have a 18 pressure on average with my BiPAP auto
If everyone thinks alike, then someone isn't thinking.
Everyone knows something, together we could know everything.
Post Reply Post Reply
#26
(10-27-2014, 11:12 PM)Galactus Wrote: My start pressure was 18 fixed, I have since lost 100 and still have a 18 pressure on average with my BiPAP auto

The first sleep doctor I had said my sleep apnea was because I was too d%^* fat and that he didn't want to see me anymore until I lost weight. Can I ask how you lost 100 lbs? To me...that is absolutely awesome! I would give anything to lose even half that amount.

Post Reply Post Reply


#27
(10-28-2014, 10:04 PM)GrammaBear Wrote:
(10-27-2014, 11:12 PM)Galactus Wrote: My start pressure was 18 fixed, I have since lost 100 and still have a 18 pressure on average with my BiPAP auto

The first sleep doctor I had said my sleep apnea was because I was too d%^* fat and that he didn't want to see me anymore until I lost weight. Can I ask how you lost 100 lbs? To me...that is absolutely awesome! I would give anything to lose even half that amount.

Edited 10/29/2014 by special request from PhyllisBalboa;

Sure, I can tell you how I am doing it, it's still a work in progress. The first thing I did was decide I wanted to get the weight off. Then I downloaded about 20 phone apps that had helpful tracking, I settled on the one I liked best (myfitnesspal). I started just tracking what I was eating. Not doing anything but just logging what I ate, when I ate it, how many calories I was actually eating. After about two weeks I started to review on average how many calories a day I was eating. It became very obvious that I was eating way too much. I saw single meals that were 3000 calories or more, and crazy stuff I was doing.

Armed with that knowledge I looked into all the obvious choices, bariatric surgery, pills, weight watchers, and all the programs. I met a nice lady at my Dr office that was a nutritionist and we started talking. I realized that if I went for surgery there were major complications I was not interested in, and at the end I would need to change my diet completely anyway. I found nothing that was going to work for me from what I saw. So I continued to log the food and look at the results. I started researching, and talking to the nutritionist and seeing her monthly.

I began to realize that if I just made more intelligent choices and swapped some foods for others I could reduce what I was eating calorically speaking and start eating less. For example rather than have 5 hot dogs and buns, or 5 sausages with however much pasta I could eat meatballs with lower fat content chopped meat and rather than having 1200 calories of sausage I could have 800 calories of meatballs. Instead of a pound of pasta I could eat 12 ounces, another 400 calories down. Rather than have two plates of fried shrimp for 2000+ calories I could have two plates of shrimp cocktail shrimp and have only 400 calories of food but still have those huge portions. Instead of a 16 ounce rib eye steak there was 16 ounces of pork sirloin, 1600 calories vs 560.

Each change was a small step, not too painful, just baby steps. then I'd go talk to the nutritionist and she'd suggest "try eating this instead of that" and we'd look at the calories, and go step by step. Eating less calories with the same sized portions resulted in the same fullness and relaxation of eating and yet the result was less calories. Less calories less to becoming fuller faster. I soon found I didn't need all that pasta, and instead of regular pasta I started eating lower carb pasta, and high grain pastas. All those lower calories started to change me by eating less without knowing it really or rather without feeling it.

Then I began noticing that I didn't need two plates of shrimp, a plate and a half was enough, and I didn't need a pound of chopped meat, and so on. As I kept keeping track of my calories I saw they were coming down first by 10% then 20% then week by week less and less. At some point someone asked if I could get by on 3500 calories a day, so that became the goal. Then 3000 became the goal a month later, I stayed there for a while, then I started to notice I was just eating less 2500 calories a day became the usual just all by itself, and slowly but surely I just started eating less and less, and I was full.

It's been a hard rough road, and I still have many days where I'm not happy about what I'm eating. I've posted many times that I can't bear to look at another carrot but I persevere and I have learned to be happy with the small goals, like another 5 pounds gone and another and another, and well before you know it you have changed everything you are eating, eating less and the results, well you can see them on the scale. You can also see them on the calorie counts.

I think the most important thing to do is take stock of what you are doing, and know what you are eating. I hear many people say things like "I'm eating all the same food and still gaining weight" and things like that. Well, that is rarely the case. If you take the time and log it you'll see you are eating more and that is why you're gaining weight. It's a day by day thing though, and even now I have my days, but I keep going and changing things as I see my mistakes. Frankly quitting smoking was far easier than this ever is. I mean you decide no more cigarettes and then you don't smoke again, but I can't stop eating so I must keep modifying what I do eat. Much harder, but hey at the end of the day it really is worth it, at least for me. I wish you all the best, hope I helped you.
If everyone thinks alike, then someone isn't thinking.
Everyone knows something, together we could know everything.
Post Reply Post Reply
#28
Galactus - Thank You for taking the time to answer my question. I can see that logging the food you ate was 'key' for you. Just last week I got a smart phone so when I learn how to operate it properly, I could download apps as you did. Eating less would be better for me as I also have type 1 diabetes. Who knows, I might be able to cut back on my insulin a little bit.

Didn't you have to buy a whole new wardrobe after that "weight loss"? Did you take 'before' and 'after' pictures?
Post Reply Post Reply
#29
Hey Grammabear, I'm to answer, hope in some way it helped you.

These smartphones are quite easy, really. Click that google play icon the one you always see on tv and advertised everywhere, looks like a funny triangle, that takes you right to the play store. My Fitness Pal is a very popular app, as you type the letters in the search box it will come up, it's that popular, and it is simple easy to use, just click the meal add what you ate, in most cases it will find the item and give you all the details as well as calarories. If it is packaged food you can even just scan the barcode and it will do the rest. I don't want to say it is idiot proof, but it is rather simplistic in design and execution.

Just like with apnea, once you have the data it isn't hard to see what is happening and make even the small changes, all of them add up. Some were not even hard to do, very easy things like just different meat selections, or food selections, foods I was already eating so it was good.

I didn't buy all new clothes, but the clothes I had started to fit better and then things I had kept in the cabinet that I had grown out of began to fit again. So no I really haven't bought a whole new wardrobe, but then again for me this is not yet a before and after, for me this is a during, lol. So yes, I did take before pictures, and I do plan on taking after pictures, I have even taken some during pictures. But I won't be sharing them, I plan on burning them, in a very hot fast fire. Which likely won't help as they are digital, and backed up.

I would think losing the weight would help your diabetes as well. Carrying all that weight isn't good for any of us anyway, even if we are in our prime of health.
If everyone thinks alike, then someone isn't thinking.
Everyone knows something, together we could know everything.
Post Reply Post Reply


#30
(10-28-2014, 11:53 PM)Galactus Wrote:
(10-28-2014, 10:04 PM)GrammaBear Wrote:
(10-27-2014, 11:12 PM)Galactus Wrote: My start pressure was 18 fixed, I have since lost 100 and still have a 18 pressure on average with my BiPAP auto

The first sleep doctor I had said my sleep apnea was because I was too d%^* fat and that he didn't want to see me anymore until I lost weight. Can I ask how you lost 100 lbs? To me...that is absolutely awesome! I would give anything to lose even half that amount.

Sure, I can tell you how I am doing it, it's still a work in progress. The first thing I did was decide I wanted to get the weight off. Then I downloaded about 20 phone apps that had helpful tracking, I settled on the one I liked best (myfitnesspal). I started just tracking what I was eating. Not doing anything but just logging what I ate, when I ate it, how many calories I was actually eating. After about two weeks I started to review on average how many calories a day I was eating. It became very obvious that I was eating way too much. I saw single meals that were 3000 calories or more, and crazy stuff I was doing. Armed with that knowledge I looked into all the obvious choices, bariatric surgery, pills, weight watchers, and all the programs. I met a nice lady at my Dr office that was a nutritionist and we started talking. I realized that if I went for surgery there were major complications I was not interested in, and at the end I would need to change my diet completely anyway. I found nothing that was going to work for me from what I saw. So I continued to log the food and look at the results. I started researching, and talking to the nutritionist and seeing her monthly. I began to realize that if I just made more intelligent choices and swapped some foods for others I could reduce what I was eating calorically speaking and start eating less. For example rather than have 5 hot dogs and buns, or 5 sausages with however much pasta I could eat meatballs with lower fat content chopped meat and rather than having 1200 calories of sausage I could have 800 calories of meatballs. Instead of a pound of pasta I could eat 12 ounces, another 400 calories down. Rather than have two plates of fried shrimp for 2000+ calories I could have two plates of shrimp cocktail shrimp and have only 400 calories of food but still have those huge portions. Instead of a 16 ounce rib eye steak there was 16 ounces of pork sirloin, 1600 calories vs 560. Each change was a small step, not too painful, just baby steps. then I'd go talk to the nutritionist and she'd suggest "try eating this instead of that" and we'd look at the calories, and go step by step. Eating less calories with the same sized portions resulted in the same fullness and relaxation of eating and yet the result was less calories. Less calories less to becoming fuller faster. I soon found I didn't need all that pasta, and instead of regular pasta I started eating lower carb pasta, and high grain pastas. All those lower calories started to change me by eating less without knowing it really or rather without feeling it. Then I began noticing that I didn't need two plates of shrimp, a plate and a half was enough, and I didn't need a pound of chopped meat, and so on. As I kept keeping track of my calories I saw they were coming down first by 10% then 20% then week by week less and less. At some point someone asked if I could get by on 3500 calories a day, so that became the goal. Then 3000 became the goal a month later, I stayed there for a while, then I started to notice I was just eating less 2500 calories a day became the usual just all by itself, and slowly but surely I just started eating less and less, and I was full. It's been a hard rough road, and I still have many days where I'm not happy about what I'm eating. I've posted many times that I can't bear to look at another carrot but I persevere and I have learned to be happy with the small goals, like another 5 pounds gone and another and another, and well before you know it you have changed everything you are eating, eating less and the results, well you can see them on the scale. You can also see them on the calorie counts. I think the most important thing to do is take stock of what you are doing, and know what you are eating. I hear many people say things like "I'm eating all the same food and still gaining weight" and things like that. Well, that is rarely the case. If you take the time and log it you'll see you are eating more and that is why you're gaining weight. It's a day by day thing though, and even now I have my days, but I keep going and changing things as I see my mistakes. Frankly quitting smoking was far easier than this ever is. I mean you decide no more cigarettes and then you don't smoke again, but I can't stop eating so I must keep modifying what I do eat. Much harder, but hey at the end of the day it really is worth it, at least for me. I wish you all the best, hope I helped you.

Wow! What a voyage you are on! Doing well and helping others, such as me.

Thank you!
Evpraxia in the Pacific Northwest USA
Diagnosed: 44 AHI when supine, O2 down to 82%
Treated since 20 Sept 2014:: 0.7 AHI, Settings 7-15, EPR on Full Time at Level 3
Better living through CPAP/APAP machines!
Post Reply Post Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Sleep Apnea and Maintenance of wakefulness test Samelia 10 174 4 hours ago
Last Post: dwd1249
  mouth breather - lost weight KCap 4 184 05-18-2017, 08:52 PM
Last Post: chill
  Does anyone ever "recover" from sleep apnea? JaneAM 8 253 05-17-2017, 11:56 AM
Last Post: TASmart
  [Diagnosis] Apnea's during sleep test.... MDHilz 5 159 05-13-2017, 04:12 PM
Last Post: xxyzx
  [Diagnosis] Noob: Is Sleep Apnea the Problem? bguppy 17 579 05-10-2017, 12:42 PM
Last Post: bguppy
  [Diagnosis] Sleep Apnea RK176 11 398 05-09-2017, 07:42 PM
Last Post: ajack
  Has anyone been cured of obstructive sleep apnea after tonsillectomy? Russatrice 15 419 05-09-2017, 06:11 AM
Last Post: Kuthullu

Forum Jump:

New Posts   Today's Posts




About Apnea Board

Apnea Board is an educational web site designed to empower Sleep Apnea patients.

For any more information, please use our contact form.