Hello Guest, Welcome to Apnea Board !
As a guest, you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use.
To post a message, you must create a free account using a valid email address.

or Create an Account


New Posts   Today's Posts

[Health] CPAP and eye pressure
#11
(10-12-2012, 03:44 PM)PaulaO2 Wrote: I've had the diagnosis of 'ocular hypertension' for a while. Normal range is 10 - 21. The pressure in my left eye is always the highest. I've had the visual field test so many times I think I have it memorized. Next week I go for yet another test because for the first time, the optic nerve is showing signs of damage. My primary condition, EDS, is a defect in collagen and the eye is nearly all collagen. Eye issues, including eye pressure, is common with EDS.

Meanwhile, I woke up yet again with my left eye nearly glued shut. This incidence has been increasing and is now quite annoying. Usually it is limited to allergy season or other allergies with nasal symptoms. It is always my left eye because I sleep predominantly on my left side. I am assuming the fluid is helped by gravity and comes out the left eye.

This got me to thinking whether or not CPAP has anything to do with intraocular pressure.

And it does.

Quote:RESULTS:

Baseline measurements showed a significant nycththemeral fluctuation in the average IOP, with the highest IOPs at night. After 1 month of CPAP therapy, the average IOP was significantly higher than baseline. The increase in overnight IOP was also significantly higher. A 24-hour IOP fluctuation of > or =8 mm Hg was found in 7 patients at baseline and in 12 patients during CPAP therapy. The mean difference between trough and peak IOP was 6.7 +/- 1.5 mm Hg at baseline and 9.0 +/- 2.0 mm Hg during CPAP therapy. Thirty minutes after CPAP cessation a significant decrease in IOP was recorded. There was a statistically significant decrease in mean OPP during CPAP therapy.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients with OSA demonstrated significant 24-hour IOP fluctuations, with the highest values at night. CPAP therapy causes an additional IOP increase, especially at night. Regular screening of visual fields and the optic disc is warranted for all patients with OSA, especially those treated with CPAP.

(source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18326715 )

Quote:Nasal CPAP during wakefulness increases intraocular pressure in glaucoma

Few important side-effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) have been reported. No increase of intraocular pressure (IOP) complicating this treatment has previously been described. The goal of our study was to analyse the influence of nCPAP on IOP. We evaluated 18 patients previously diagnosed as having glaucoma and 22 normal subjects. nCPAP was used during wakefulness, at +12 cmH2O for 15 min. The results showed that nCPAP significantly increases IOP in patients with glaucoma (before nCPAP 20.3 +/- 6.3 mmHg) (mean +/- SEM); after nCPAP 22.3 +/- 5.7 mmHg. We believe that nCPAP might be relatively contraindicated in difficult to manage glaucoma patients, if these results are corroborated.

(source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7841974 )

So I was wondering if anyone else has any information or has glaucoma or ocular hypertension.
Wow thanks for the heads up on this. I have high iop s. So now will insist on more testing. This is not good news.
Post Reply Post Reply
#12
(10-12-2012, 03:44 PM)PaulaO2 Wrote: I've had the diagnosis of 'ocular hypertension' for a while. Normal range is 10 - 21. The pressure in my left eye is always the highest. I've had the visual field test so many times I think I have it memorized. Next week I go for yet another test because for the first time, the optic nerve is showing signs of damage. My primary condition, EDS, is a defect in collagen and the eye is nearly all collagen. Eye issues, including eye pressure, is common with EDS.

Meanwhile, I woke up yet again with my left eye nearly glued shut. This incidence has been increasing and is now quite annoying. Usually it is limited to allergy season or other allergies with nasal symptoms. It is always my left eye because I sleep predominantly on my left side. I am assuming the fluid is helped by gravity and comes out the left eye.

This got me to thinking whether or not CPAP has anything to do with intraocular pressure.

And it does.

Quote:RESULTS:

Baseline measurements showed a significant nycththemeral fluctuation in the average IOP, with the highest IOPs at night. After 1 month of CPAP therapy, the average IOP was significantly higher than baseline. The increase in overnight IOP was also significantly higher. A 24-hour IOP fluctuation of > or =8 mm Hg was found in 7 patients at baseline and in 12 patients during CPAP therapy. The mean difference between trough and peak IOP was 6.7 +/- 1.5 mm Hg at baseline and 9.0 +/- 2.0 mm Hg during CPAP therapy. Thirty minutes after CPAP cessation a significant decrease in IOP was recorded. There was a statistically significant decrease in mean OPP during CPAP therapy.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients with OSA demonstrated significant 24-hour IOP fluctuations, with the highest values at night. CPAP therapy causes an additional IOP increase, especially at night. Regular screening of visual fields and the optic disc is warranted for all patients with OSA, especially those treated with CPAP.

(source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18326715 )

Quote:Nasal CPAP during wakefulness increases intraocular pressure in glaucoma

Few important side-effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) have been reported. No increase of intraocular pressure (IOP) complicating this treatment has previously been described. The goal of our study was to analyse the influence of nCPAP on IOP. We evaluated 18 patients previously diagnosed as having glaucoma and 22 normal subjects. nCPAP was used during wakefulness, at +12 cmH2O for 15 min. The results showed that nCPAP significantly increases IOP in patients with glaucoma (before nCPAP 20.3 +/- 6.3 mmHg) (mean +/- SEM); after nCPAP 22.3 +/- 5.7 mmHg. We believe that nCPAP might be relatively contraindicated in difficult to manage glaucoma patients, if these results are corroborated.

(source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7841974 )

So I was wondering if anyone else has any information or has glaucoma or ocular hypertension.
Here's another article.
http://www.stritch.luc.edu/depts/ophtha/...watson.ppt
Post Reply Post Reply
#13
I get my pressure checked every 6 months. They also do some sort of scan, two different kinds. They look at the optic nerve by taking a really cool image of it. Retinal Digital Imaging? Another is a better version of the visual field test and is another kind of picture. I can't remember the name of it. It was all letters, something like OCT or something. They do these once a year and compare the images.

Oh, and they also measure my cornea. A thin cornea means the pressure is reading lower than it really is. So if the reading is high, it isn't good because that means it is actually higher.
http://www.glaucoma.org/glaucoma/the-imp...ckness.php
PaulaO2
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com


Breathe deeply and count to zen.

INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.




Post Reply Post Reply


#14
(12-03-2013, 06:22 PM)PaulaO2 Wrote: I get my pressure checked every 6 months. They also do some sort of scan, two different kinds. They look at the optic nerve by taking a really cool image of it. Retinal Digital Imaging? Another is a better version of the visual field test and is another kind of picture. I can't remember the name of it. It was all letters, something like OCT or something. They do these once a year and compare the images.

Oh, and they also measure my cornea. A thin cornea means the pressure is reading lower than it really is. So if the reading is high, it isn't good because that means it is actually higher.
http://www.glaucoma.org/glaucoma/the-imp...ckness.php

I just saw the eye doctor tonight and had my pressures done as a kind of baseline.
They are stable at 21 in both eyes down from 23 so I imagine the beta blocker is also helping the pressures.
Post Reply Post Reply
#15
I just got back from the eye doctor. My eye pressures have gone up from 21 to 25 since starting CPAP. My visual fields are good so they are not starting the drops yet.
Post Reply Post Reply
#16
Remember when I said the pressures had gone down. Well I switched to the Nano for a month and my pressures are the highest they have ever been 25 in both eyes. My visual fields and retina check out okay however. I'm wondering if the type of mask one uses is an issue here.
Post Reply Post Reply


#17
I am about to launch my own experiment since in my reading I have come upon a lot of references to the circadian rhythm and ebb and flow of fluid in a 24 hour period. I often wake up with swollen hands since starting CPAP as well as the increased ocular pressures. So I am going to start a program of trying to spend more time in an upright position even If I have to set a timer to get up off the recliner every half hour and move around in the evening. I do an hour of gym work but apparently that is not enough. Also I may try wearing compression stockings in the daytime so help with this unbalance of fluid. Perhaps wearing compression stockings could help keep the fluid down where it belongs instead of traveling up to my eyeballs and making trouble. I will keep you informed of my research and experiment. If my pressures go down from switching to a full face mask from nasal mask, get out of the recliner every evening, and wearing compression stockings help reduce the pressure I'll let you know.
Post Reply Post Reply
#18
(01-25-2014, 06:34 PM)Lukie Wrote: I am about to launch my own experiment since in my reading I have come upon a lot of references to the circadian rhythm and ebb and flow of fluid in a 24 hour period. I often wake up with swollen hands since starting CPAP as well as the increased ocular pressures. So I am going to start a program of trying to spend more time in an upright position even If I have to set a timer to get up off the recliner every half hour and move around in the evening. I do an hour of gym work but apparently that is not enough. Also I may try wearing compression stockings in the daytime so help with this unbalance of fluid. Perhaps wearing compression stockings could help keep the fluid down where it belongs instead of traveling up to my eyeballs and making trouble. I will keep you informed of my research and experiment. If my pressures go down from switching to a full face mask from nasal mask, get out of the recliner every evening, and wearing compression stockings help reduce the pressure I'll let you know.

you would probably need compression stockings that go all the way up your legs and not just to the knees
Post Reply Post Reply
#19
I have had pressure issues with the eyes as well.

I made other posts here on the subject.

Wink
"With ordinary talent and extraordinary perseverance, all things are attainable." - Thomas Foxwell Buxton

Cool
Post Reply Post Reply


#20
No compression stockings and no full face mask.
I love my nano and my quattro sucks with all its leaks
I went back to my nano last night and my AHI went down to 0.1
So what if my pressures are up. I'll just live with it and if I have to use
drops I will use drops. At least I am alive.
Post Reply Post Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  [CPAP] Returning to CPAP, Is my pressure too low (flow limitation problem)? See chart please MarkSleeps 6 196 8 hours ago
Last Post: MarkSleeps
  [Pressure] Changing pressure on HDM Z1 cpap dmh 22 28,134 05-22-2017, 07:38 PM
Last Post: ezhoops
  [Pressure] What is the theoritical correct pressure for a fixed pressure CPAP? Rcgop 13 507 05-14-2017, 09:00 PM
Last Post: ajack
  [Equipment] want to change pressure to cpap ECOSTAR fornica 2 225 05-06-2017, 10:03 PM
Last Post: trish6hundred
  Vertigo/CPAP Pressure Update- CPAP causing inner ear problems SuperSleeper 72 70,844 04-11-2017, 10:48 AM
Last Post: Newbee2016
  Cpap treatment leading to reduced pressure over time Newbee2016 4 422 01-31-2017, 04:04 PM
Last Post: kwhenrykerr
  Auto CPAP Pressure - Does this make sense? OldVet 4 836 12-26-2016, 11:13 PM
Last Post: Ghost1958

Forum Jump:

New Posts   Today's Posts




About Apnea Board

Apnea Board is an educational web site designed to empower Sleep Apnea patients.

For any more information, please use our contact form.