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[Health] Earbuds to help with tinnitus?
#61
RE: Earbuds to help with tinnitus?
I didn't make it through the night. heck, I barely made it an hour. I'll poke around and see if I still have it. I may have chucked it when I got the A10 and cleaned up around that shelf. It's where I keep the machine and a box of supplies (mask parts, filters, etc).
PaulaO

Take a deep breath and count to zen.




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#62
RE: Earbuds to help with tinnitus?
Something that helps me with tinnitus is to either have a fan running or to try playing monaural beats and binaural beats from your phone.  This is a simple little tone that fluctuates and has others added in.  They say they help in falling asleep, concentration and other stuff depending on the frequency ranges.  I find that something to concentrate on helps me drown out the annoying hum.

Consider yourself lucky as I also have a low rumble along with the high pitches whine.  
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#63
RE: Earbuds to help with tinnitus?
Some time past, I was hired as a consultant to evaluate and report on an engineering team's progress in developing an ultrasonic bone-conduction hearing aide for the profoundly deaf. My report was positive. About a month later the owner of the company called to ask if I would assemble and lead a new team, as he had let the previous team go. I had some reservations about this, but in the end I accepted as it was a worthy development effort that that had the potential to positively affect the lives of some who were profoundly deaf. Fast forward a year. I developed extreme tinnitus and hearing loss as a result of working with the technology in the lab. Everyone on the team did. Apparently, someone modified the upper power limits of the device in order to increase efficacy. While still working at the company, I took an interest in tinnitus treatment solutions. I designed and prototyped a small microcontroller based system with a frequency synthesizer chip, audio amplifier, and a nice user interface with a display, rotary encoder and a couple of pushbuttons. This all worked off of 4 AA cells. My tinnitus consisted mostly of a narrow range of frequencies in both ears. I designed the device to experiment with a tinnitus reduction method called residual inhibition. This was before start phones, tablets, and computer sound boards that might be programmed to achieve the same functions today. The idea is that if you set the device frequency to the center frequency of your tinnitus and then modulate the frequency (change it up and down, similar to a siren, but not loud at all) at some rate, and listen to this for 10 minutes, when you turn off the sound, your tinnitus (in some cases) will temporarily be quiet. My device let me set the center frequency, the +/- variation, and the cycle time of the variation, along with the volume, from the front control panel. For some, after frequent use, the therapy will inhibit the tinnitus for longer and longer periods of time. I found this to be true in my case. Alas, in the long run, the inhibition was temporary. I left the technology with the company when I found that the limits on the other device I worked on had been altered. I did let others know of my finding.

Since then, I've worn hearing aides of some sort or another. Besides helping me to hear, I find they remove my focus from the tinnitus by amplifying the surrounding sounds. This is a form of masking. I've also grown use to it so that it is no longer a huge distraction. My current hearing aides are made connect to my smart phone over BlueTooth which allow me for the first time to easily have voice conversations over the phone, FaceTime, Skype, etc. Another plus, its nice to have a plus with hearing aides, is that when I stream music to my hearing aides over BlueTooth, it is played through my hearing aide prescription. Some people look at me oddly when I'm talking on the phone out in public. They are unable to see the hearing aides and assume that I'm talking to myself. My hearing aides have a tinnitus masking mode with pink or white noise. I find that white or pink noise increases the loudness of my tinnitus. Sometimes I'll simply play some chamber music or hymns to take my attention away from the ringing.

Tom
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#64
RE: Earbuds to help with tinnitus?
I bought a white noise machine. With it playing at night filling the room with soft noise, I don't notice the ringing in my ears. Cannot sleep without it
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