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[Health] Still Sleepy
#11
Were can I find the Resmed or the sleepy head software?

Thanks again

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#12
Hi robysue, WELCOME! to the forum.!
Your blog is very informative.
trish6hundred
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#13
If 95% is at or below a certain pressure, that really doesn't tell us much does it (that could be anywhere from 12 to 19.9 in my case) and the 5% is above 19.9% in my case (which you can really go any higher) doesn't tell us much. The graphs in the program can tell us but how many docs really look at the graphs to see where the pressure is? Do I understand this correctly?

Just thinking out loud lol
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#14
(10-22-2013, 07:55 PM)trueblue Wrote: Were can I find the Resmed or the sleepy head software?

Thanks again
http://www.apneaboard.com/forums/Forum-P...-and-Links

ResScan Report Interpretation Guide
http://www.apneaboard.com/ResScan_Interp...-Guide.pdf


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#15
Thanks for the link I have downloaded the software.
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#16
(10-22-2013, 08:17 PM)trish6hundred Wrote: Hi robysue, WELCOME! to the forum.!
Your blog is very informative.
Thanks for the compliment. I've been using a BiPAP for three years now and I've been an active member of two other forums, but only now stumbled across this one.
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#17
(10-22-2013, 08:30 PM)me50 Wrote: If 95% is at or below a certain pressure, that really doesn't tell us much does it (that could be anywhere from 12 to 19.9 in my case) and the 5% is above 19.9% in my case (which you can really go any higher) doesn't tell us much. The graphs in the program can tell us but how many docs really look at the graphs to see where the pressure is? Do I understand this correctly?

Just thinking out loud lol

Many docs care about the 95% pressure level because that pressure level is enough to take care of your apneas most of the time. If a doc is using an APAP to do an autotitration to fine tune or confirm a lab titration with the intention of prescribing a fixed pressure setting, that's the number they're going to focus on.

As for auto adjusting ranges, there's some debate about what's the best way to choose an auto range. One school of thought seems to be that the min pressure setting should not be too far below the 95% pressure level: The lower the minimum pressure, the larger the gap between the minimum pressure setting and the actual pressure that you need to properly control your apnea. And the larger that gap, the larger the number of events that gets through the defenses before the pressure is increased enough to provide an adequate level of protection.
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#18
(10-23-2013, 12:44 AM)robysue Wrote:
(10-22-2013, 08:30 PM)me50 Wrote: If 95% is at or below a certain pressure, that really doesn't tell us much does it (that could be anywhere from 12 to 19.9 in my case) and the 5% is above 19.9% in my case (which you can really go any higher) doesn't tell us much. The graphs in the program can tell us but how many docs really look at the graphs to see where the pressure is? Do I understand this correctly?

Just thinking out loud lol

Many docs care about the 95% pressure level because that pressure level is enough to take care of your apneas most of the time. If a doc is using an APAP to do an autotitration to fine tune or confirm a lab titration with the intention of prescribing a fixed pressure setting, that's the number they're going to focus on.

As for auto adjusting ranges, there's some debate about what's the best way to choose an auto range. One school of thought seems to be that the min pressure setting should not be too far below the 95% pressure level: The lower the minimum pressure, the larger the gap between the minimum pressure setting and the actual pressure that you need to properly control your apnea. And the larger that gap, the larger the number of events that gets through the defenses before the pressure is increased enough to provide an adequate level of protection.

I don't know if they used an APAP in the sleep study. I just know that the Sleep Tech could change my pressure without coming to my room. I do know that I was on a set pressure to see what happened and then they went up from there. My SP02 was in the 80's at pressure 14, 15 and 16 and that really concerns me. At 12 and 13, it was 92. At 14 it was 88. At 15 and 16 it was 85. So, I am really concerned about this too.
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#19
(10-23-2013, 12:44 AM)robysue Wrote: As for auto adjusting ranges, there's some debate about what's the best way to choose an auto range. One school of thought seems to be that the min pressure setting should not be too far below the 95% pressure level: The lower the minimum pressure, the larger the gap between the minimum pressure setting and the actual pressure that you need to properly control your apnea. And the larger that gap, the larger the number of events that gets through the defenses before the pressure is increased enough to provide an adequate level of protection.

The problem with that logic is that, if you need a higher treatment pressure when you are lying on your back (as most do), and you occasionally but not always lie on your back, your lower pressure setting might be higher than what would be needed for when you are lying on your side.

That is also going to be not to far different from simply using a fixed-pressure CPAP treatment at your 95% pressure point. Keep in mind that an auto-CPAP attempts to anticipate apnea events by detecting snoring and flow limitation, so it will typically provide a treatment pressure that is slightly higher than what is actually required to prevent apneas.

Personally, I set the upper limit to the maximum I am prepared to tolerate (typically 20) and the lower limit to around what is the minimum typically needed when I am asleep.
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#20
(10-23-2013, 01:29 PM)RonWessels Wrote: Personally, I set the upper limit to the maximum I am prepared to tolerate (typically 20) and the lower limit to around what is the minimum typically needed when I am asleep.
Makes no difference how we go about the business ... all roads lead to Rome
I set the minimum to what feel comfortable (not too low and wait for the magic to happen)
In the past 95% used to hit the roof, may be leaks or the machine chasing flow limitation but now for reason beyond me (no weight loss ... wishful thinking) little variations between median, 95% and maximum

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