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Heated Tubing? Need your recommendations
#1
Thanks in advance for reading this. I often camp, sleeping in a hammock. I hang my IntelliPAP travel machine from the ridgeline above the hammock, about two feet above me in the enclosed hammock. As the temperatures have cooled this fall I am finding the inhalation temps to be a little cool in the wee hours of the morning, causing me to wake. I have the integrated heated humidifier for it, but because I suspend the machine inside the enclosed hammock I cannot fill the humidifier part of it with water or I risk a drenching during the night as the ridgeline bounces while I turn in my sleep. I have not needed the humidifier and have not been using it, but I would use it in this situation if it could be used without the water to heat the air. What are my best options? Can I use the heated humidifier WITHOUT the water to heat the air? That would be the best of all worlds. If not, is a heated tube my next best option? If so, which one works best, and is it compatible with my setup? I have A/C available where I camp, and 400 watts (3.3 amps) of invertor A/C power in the boat when I string the hammock in it. Thanks again for investing your time in me!
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#2
Welcome

The humidifier depends upon water to prevent it overheating. It's just not intended to run dry.

And, the heated hose is intended to connect to the humidifier. I'm not sure, from what I read, that a heated hose is an option for your unit.
I just don't see a viable option for your situation.

Regards,

Mongo
INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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#3
You don't have any options, I'm afraid. As already mentioned, the heated tube works with the humidifier and the humidifier isn't intended to run dry. You'll just have to do without any heating.
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#4
I have used a heated tube every night since I started PAP 5 years ago. I have used Resmed S9 where the heated tube humidifier is standard and PRS 1 60 series with the optional heated tube humidifier.
Your system is different, but there are independently heated tubes available. They require their own power source.
You can check supplier number 1 or Google CPAP heated tube.

Good luck, you do have options.
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#5
(11-19-2015, 09:58 AM)Night Train Wrote: Thanks in advance for reading this. I often camp, sleeping in a hammock. I hang my IntelliPAP travel machine from the ridgeline above the hammock, about two feet above me in the enclosed hammock. As the temperatures have cooled this fall I am finding the inhalation temps to be a little cool in the wee hours of the morning, causing me to wake. I have the integrated heated humidifier for it, but because I suspend the machine inside the enclosed hammock I cannot fill the humidifier part of it with water or I risk a drenching during the night as the ridgeline bounces while I turn in my sleep. I have not needed the humidifier and have not been using it, but I would use it in this situation if it could be used without the water to heat the air. What are my best options? Can I use the heated humidifier WITHOUT the water to heat the air? That would be the best of all worlds. If not, is a heated tube my next best option? If so, which one works best, and is it compatible with my setup? I have A/C available where I camp, and 400 watts (3.3 amps) of invertor A/C power in the boat when I string the hammock in it. Thanks again for investing your time in me!

I do not recommend running a heated humidifier without water - the heating element could overheat and possibly crack. Also a heated hose is really more for preventing condensation than actually keeping the air noticeably warm. It might kinda take the "edge" off the cold outside air, but I wouldn't expect it to perform as well as a heated humidifier. I'm not familiar with your specific CPAP machine, but I would check with your supplier or the machine's user guide to see if your machine supports a heated hose - there has to be a specific electric connection between the hose and the machine, usually a metal tab of some sort.
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#6
(11-19-2015, 01:50 PM)bwexler Wrote: I have used a heated tube every night since I started PAP 5 years ago. I have used Resmed S9 where the heated tube humidifier is standard and PRS 1 60 series with the optional heated tube humidifier.
Your system is different, but there are independently heated tubes available. They require their own power source.
You can check supplier number 1 or Google CPAP heated tube.

Good luck, you do have options.

bwexler is correct, there are independent heated tubes. The general purpose of the heated tube is to keep the tube wall warm enough for humidified air to not condense on the tube surface and cause an effect called rainout. Whether or not it can actually warm rapidly moving air in the tube is an open question. It might turn out to be an expensive experiment with a poor result.
INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
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#7
(11-19-2015, 02:06 PM)justMongo Wrote: The general purpose of the heated tube is to keep the tube wall warm enough for humidified air to not condense on the tube surface and cause an effect called rainout. Whether or not it can actually warm rapidly moving air in the tube is an open question.

Well I'm pretty sure I notice the temperature of the air coming out of the hose is warmer when I increase the setting and cooler when I decrease it. But I haven't done a double blind test.


Ed Seedhouse
VA7SDH

The above is my opinion.  It is just possible that I may, occasionally, be mistaken.

I am neither a Doctor, nor any other kind of medical professional.

Everything put together sooner or later falls apart.
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#8
the heated tube *does* warm the air, for which I am most grateful... I turn mine up as high as it will go as I perfectly detest cool air blowing across any part of me. Even the P10 venting is warmer with the hose turned up - and I need it to be!
هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه
Tongue Suck Technique for prevention of mouth breathing:
  • Place your tongue behind your front teeth on the roof of your mouth
  • let your tongue fill the space between the upper molars
  • gently suck to form a light vacuum
Practising during the day can help you to keep it at night

هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه
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#9
What about at least trying a hose cover? That might help the water temp stay a bit warmer. I've just started using one a week ago although I did it more to reduce the noise of it banging into my bedside table while I turn over in the night. I bought one from the US amazon for just under $11 and it was a Respironics branded cover without zipper as I felt one with a zipper might be heavier.
APNEABOARD - A great place to be if you're a hosehead!! Rolleyes

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EVERY ACCOMPLISHMENT BEGINS WITH THE DECISION TO TRY!
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#10
(11-19-2015, 02:23 PM)DariaVader Wrote: the heated tube *does* warm the air, for which I am most grateful... I turn mine up as high as it will go as I perfectly detest cool air blowing across any part of me. Even the P10 venting is warmer with the hose turned up - and I need it to be!

Thermodynamically, it makes more sense that the heated hose probably helps the flowing air not to cool significantly on its way to the mask, but I seriously doubt it actively "warms" the air much. First of all, air is an extremely poor conductor of heat. Second, the molecules that make up air are flowing through the tube so quickly (60 L/min or so) that they don't have much time (1-2 secs) to be heated via conduction during the short time they are traveling through the tube. In the case here, he needs the air to be heated completely by the tube, not the humidifier. So, I would not expect very good results.

In any case, it would be an interesting experiment to disable the heated humidifier but enable the heated hose to see how much it affects the incoming air temperature. Though, with the impending winter, that is an experiment I'm unlikely to try anytime soon. Wink
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