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Heated tube
#1
If you were buying a new machine, would you get the heated tube option? What does it do for you and if a person doesn't like it can it be turned off?
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#2
I would not go without it and have been using heated tubing since before it was an option with a machine in 2008. The heated tube can be controlled separately from humidity, including turning it off. The main benefit is to warm the hose surface temperature between the humidifier and mask to prevent condensation or rain-out. Warmer moist air will condense on cool surfaces like the hose. The heated tube does not actually warm the air much.
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#3
(03-01-2016, 09:29 AM)Sleeprider Wrote: I would not go without it and have been using heated tubing since before it was an option with a machine in 2008. The heated tube can be controlled separately from humidity, including turning it off. The main benefit is to warm the hose surface temperature between the humidifier and mask to prevent condensation or rain-out. Warmer moist air will condense on cool surfaces like the hose. The heated tube does not actually warm the air much.

Thanks, That answers my question.
I didn't think I would like breathing heated air.
I do have trouble sometimes with condensation as the humidity in my house changes daily it seems.
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#4
Agree, go with the heated tube.

It doesn't make the air hot, it just takes that chill off, so your not breathing in cold air. The biggest advantage is that it will cut down on condensation in the hose. And help deliver more humidity.

If you don't like it, can be turned off.
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#5
Well you live close (maybe) to the lakes and should have heard of lake effect snow. Yes this relates to a heated hose. Moist air going over cold land makes snow (moisture falling out of the air). The only way to add humidity to air is to heat it, even if only slightly. So if you room is colder than the water chamber, when the air goes into the hose it will condense out some, or a lot, of the water. The heated tube just makes it so the hose is no longer colder than the water tank, so no rain out.

There is a heater under the water tank, this is why there is a metal plate in the bottom of the tank. This heater is what the CPAP uses to set the temperature of the air you breathe, and the heater in the hose is adjusted to keep the hose close to or above the water temperature.
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#6
Definitely go for the heated tube- my new ASV (that is being picked up today) did not have a prescription for it, and I contacted my Respiratory Therapist and she added a prescription for the heated tube for me - I am glad I checked on it before my appointment to pick up my new ASV.
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#7
Hi I_will_never_sleep_again,
I wouldn't be without my heated tube for the reasons mentioned above.
trish6hundred
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#8
(03-01-2016, 01:13 PM)PoolQ Wrote: Well you live close (maybe) to the lakes and should have heard of lake effect snow. Yes this relates to a heated hose. Moist air going over cold land makes snow (moisture falling out of the air). The only way to add humidity to air is to heat it, even if only slightly. So if you room is colder than the water chamber, when the air goes into the hose it will condense out some, or a lot, of the water. The heated tube just makes it so the hose is no longer colder than the water tank, so no rain out.

There is a heater under the water tank, this is why there is a metal plate in the bottom of the tank. This heater is what the CPAP uses to set the temperature of the air you breathe, and the heater in the hose is adjusted to keep the hose close to or above the water temperature.

Wow. I don't mean to offend, but that is so wrong, and as a scientist I just gotta:

Lake effect snow is from cold air passing over warmer open water, which allows moisture to evaporate into the air. As it passes over land it cools and condenses, depositing snow as it lifts over land on the downwind side. Lake effect snow is like CPAP rain-out where warm moist air cools as it passes through the hose. Heating air actually makes relative humidity lower, which is why heated space in winter is so dry.

Warmer air can hold more moisture than cold air. When warm moist air cools, it releases moisture, which is what causes moisture in an unheated or uninsulated CPAP hose or mask, or dew on cool lawns and cars on a warm humid night.

The heater under the tank is to raise the temperature of water, not air. This causes water molecules to move faster and evaporate into the air moving over the water. There is some heat transfer with the moisture, but the point of the heater is not to heat air. It would be easy to make a small heat exchanger (radiator) to to that if it was desirable, but heating air, would actually make it dryer. The heated tube merely keeps the hose surface warmer to prevent condensation.
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#9
(03-01-2016, 05:50 PM)Sleeprider Wrote:
(03-01-2016, 01:13 PM)PoolQ Wrote: Well you live close (maybe) to the lakes and should have heard of lake effect snow. Yes this relates to a heated hose. Moist air going over cold land makes snow (moisture falling out of the air). The only way to add humidity to air is to heat it, even if only slightly. So if you room is colder than the water chamber, when the air goes into the hose it will condense out some, or a lot, of the water. The heated tube just makes it so the hose is no longer colder than the water tank, so no rain out.

There is a heater under the water tank, this is why there is a metal plate in the bottom of the tank. This heater is what the CPAP uses to set the temperature of the air you breathe, and the heater in the hose is adjusted to keep the hose close to or above the water temperature.

Wow. I don't mean to offend, but that is so wrong, and as a scientist I just gotta:

Lake effect snow is from cold air passing over warmer open water, which allows moisture to evaporate into the air. As it passes over land it cools and condenses, depositing snow as it lifts over land on the downwind side. Lake effect snow is like CPAP rain-out where warm moist air cools as it passes through the hose. Heating air actually makes relative humidity lower, which is why heated space in winter is so dry.

Warmer air can hold more moisture than cold air. When warm moist air cools, it releases moisture, which is what causes moisture in an unheated or uninsulated CPAP hose or mask, or dew on cool lawns and cars on a warm humid night.

The heater under the tank is to raise the temperature of water, not air. This causes water molecules to move faster and evaporate into the air moving over the water. There is some heat transfer with the moisture, but the point of the heater is not to heat air. It would be easy to make a small heat exchanger (radiator) to to that if it was desirable, but heating air, would actually make it dryer. The heated tube merely keeps the hose surface warmer to prevent condensation.

Okay, so I must not have been clear enough because I thought what I was saying is EXACTLY what you are saying. We are in total agreement, not sure where I threw you off.
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#10
Moist air going over cold land makes snow (moisture falling out of the air). Yes the moist air is caused by air going over the water, which in winter the water will be warmer that the air.


The only way to add humidity to air is to heat it, even if only slightly. either way, if you heat the air and pass it over the water it will pick up "some" water if on the other hand you heat the water then it will pick up more water

So if you room is colder than the water chamber, when the air goes into the hose it will condense out some, or a lot, of the water. Not sure if this needs further explination.

The heated tube just makes it so the hose is no longer colder than the water tank, so no rain out. same here

There is a heater under the water tank, this is why there is a metal plate in the bottom of the tank. true fact TO HEAT THE WATER

This heater is what the CPAP uses to set the temperature of the air you breathe, yes indirectly as above the heater heats the water which warms up the air

and the heater in the hose is adjusted to keep the hose close to or above the water temperature. Factually true I believe

I guess I did not spell it all out but I don't think I actually misstated anything. Again in my mind the exact same thing you are saying
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