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High blood pressure and sleep apnea
#1
I was reading an article this afternoon on the Internet that indicates high blood pressure is often found in those people with sleep apnea. In those of us with high blood pressure, how can we help ourselves to have better numbers? Lately my ahi numbers have varied from .4 to 1.6 and my blood pressure has also been rising. I am currently being treated for high blood pressure and I am following a low carb diet. I also take regular exercise in the form of 30 minutes a day riding a stationary bike.
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#2
having the same issue and on 3 meds (cozaar+hct and carvedilol) for it Sad so far papping has not brought it down like I heard from some folk.
هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه
Tongue Suck Technique for prevention of mouth breathing:
  • Place your tongue behind your front teeth on the roof of your mouth
  • let your tongue fill the space between the upper molars
  • gently suck to form a light vacuum
Practising during the day can help you to keep it at night

هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه هههههه
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#3
(02-17-2016, 06:53 PM)DariaVader Wrote: having the same issue and on 3 meds (cozaar+hct and carvedilol) for it Sad so far papping has not brought it down like I heard from some folk.

I'm not glad you have the same issue, but it is slightly comforting to know I'm not alone. I am also on 3 meds (metoprolol, amlodipine and micardis) and just last week the GP added spironolactone which is a diuretic. Last Fall I was on the 3 meds I mentioned in addition to hct and spironolactone, ended up in the hospital because of hyponatremia. My kidney doctor removed both diuretics and now the GP has added one back. I am compliant and take my meds as directed and I too had heard that papping would help my bp. So far I haven't seen that improvement. Sad

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#4
(02-17-2016, 06:43 PM)GrammaBear Wrote: I was reading an article this afternoon on the Internet that indicates high blood pressure is often found in those people with sleep apnea. In those of us with high blood pressure, how can we help ourselves to have better numbers? Lately my ahi numbers have varied from .4 to 1.6 and my blood pressure has also been rising. I am currently being treated for high blood pressure and I am following a low carb diet. I also take regular exercise in the form of 30 minutes a day riding a stationary bike.

High blood pressure, overweight and sleep apnea are common companions. By losing the weight, your blood pressure may fall too as well as improve the sleep apnea. I have all three problems. I have noted my blood pressure more under control with lisinopril (Zestril) after CPAP. My pulmonologist recently changed my CPAP and I am not happy with the new settings but I have only been on it a week. I need to give it more time.

I had a nuclear stress test yesterday which went extremely well, far beyond what my cardiologist thought it would. I am now on a restricted carb diet and losing weight. Also, I am in an exercise program. I don't know if this will work for everybody but it is working for me.

I hope you find over time that you, too, will get better results.

Walt

Walter W. Olson, Ph.D., P.E.
Professor Emeritus
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#5
You're already doing what you can by treating sleep apnea and the high blood pressure. As far as I know, well treated OSA is not a risk factor by itself for increased blood pressure. Many of us have other risk factors that are associated with blood pressure issues:

Smoking.
Being overweight or obese.
Lack of physical activity.
Too much salt in the diet.
Too much alcohol consumption
Stress (kids and adult children)
Hormone replacement.

Those things you can control. What you can't control is genetics and age. Untreated sleep apnea may be a risk factor, but it certainly doesn't contribute to risk when it is controlled at levels you have achieved. I recommend more time with grandkids...well, actually I made that up, but it can't hurt.
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#6
(02-17-2016, 07:15 PM)wolson Wrote:
(02-17-2016, 06:43 PM)GrammaBear Wrote: I was reading an article this afternoon on the Internet that indicates high blood pressure is often found in those people with sleep apnea. In those of us with high blood pressure, how can we help ourselves to have better numbers? Lately my ahi numbers have varied from .4 to 1.6 and my blood pressure has also been rising. I am currently being treated for high blood pressure and I am following a low carb diet. I also take regular exercise in the form of 30 minutes a day riding a stationary bike.

High blood pressure, overweight and sleep apnea are common companions. By losing the weight, your blood pressure may fall too as well as improve the sleep apnea. I have all three problems. I have noted my blood pressure more under control with lisinopril (Zestril) after CPAP. My pulmonologist recently changed my CPAP and I am not happy with the new settings but I have only been on it a week. I need to give it more time.

I had a nuclear stress test yesterday which went extremely well, far beyond what my cardiologist thought it would. I am now on a restricted carb diet and losing weight. Also, I am in an exercise program. I don't know if this will work for everybody but it is working for me.

I hope you find over time that you, too, will get better results.

Walt

I realize everyone is different and responds differently to a restricted carb diet. Being that I am type 1 diabetic, I am trying to restrict my carbs to 60-75 carbs per day, but perhaps I need to rein in my food consumption some more. Has your doctor recommended a specific amount of carbs for you?



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#7
(02-17-2016, 07:16 PM)Sleeprider Wrote: You're already doing what you can by treating sleep apnea and the high blood pressure. As far as I know, well treated OSA is not a risk factor by itself for increased blood pressure. Many of us have other risk factors that are associated with blood pressure issues:

Smoking.
Being overweight or obese.
Lack of physical activity.
Too much salt in the diet.
Too much alcohol consumption
Stress (kids and adult children)
Hormone replacement.

Those things you can control. What you can't control is genetics and age. Untreated sleep apnea may be a risk factor, but it certainly doesn't contribute to risk when it is controlled at levels you have achieved. I recommend more time with grandkids...well, actually I made that up, but it can't hurt.

I would love to spend more time with my grandchild, however he lives in another state more than 3 hours drive away from my house. Maybe I should ask his parents if they would allow him to text msg me occasionally ... Smile

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#8
(02-17-2016, 07:23 PM)GrammaBear Wrote:
(02-17-2016, 07:15 PM)wolson Wrote:
(02-17-2016, 06:43 PM)GrammaBear Wrote: I was reading an article this afternoon on the Internet that indicates high blood pressure is often found in those people with sleep apnea. In those of us with high blood pressure, how can we help ourselves to have better numbers? Lately my ahi numbers have varied from .4 to 1.6 and my blood pressure has also been rising. I am currently being treated for high blood pressure and I am following a low carb diet. I also take regular exercise in the form of 30 minutes a day riding a stationary bike.

High blood pressure, overweight and sleep apnea are common companions. By losing the weight, your blood pressure may fall too as well as improve the sleep apnea. I have all three problems. I have noted my blood pressure more under control with lisinopril (Zestril) after CPAP. My pulmonologist recently changed my CPAP and I am not happy with the new settings but I have only been on it a week. I need to give it more time.

I had a nuclear stress test yesterday which went extremely well, far beyond what my cardiologist thought it would. I am now on a restricted carb diet and losing weight. Also, I am in an exercise program. I don't know if this will work for everybody but it is working for me.

I hope you find over time that you, too, will get better results.

Walt

I realize everyone is different and responds differently to a restricted carb diet. Being that I am type 1 diabetic, I am trying to restrict my carbs to 60-75 carbs per day, but perhaps I need to rein in my food consumption some more. Has your doctor recommended a specific amount of carbs for you?

Right now, he has me on an Atkins diet.

Walt

Walter W. Olson, Ph.D., P.E.
Professor Emeritus
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#9
(02-17-2016, 07:04 PM)GrammaBear Wrote: and just last week the GP added spironolactone which is a diuretic.

This is one of the "potassium sparing" diuretics. I my case it spared so much potassium that it built up to toxic levels which paralyzed my muscles and I ended up in emergency. Too much potassium can kill you by stopping your heat. They blamed the spironolactone, which is no linger recommended for diabetics in my town.

So you might want to avoid salt supplements and high potassium foods (like potatoes, tomatoes, oranges, and of course bananas). All the "low sodium" products in the supermarket use boatloads of potassium to make the food taste more salty.

You might not have a problem with it, but I suggest you get your electrolyte levels measured at least once a year no matter what diuretic you are on.

Diuretics were the first pill that helped high blood pressure, and they are still generally a first line treatment.
Ed Seedhouse
VA7SDH

Your brain is not the boss.

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#10
(02-17-2016, 08:08 PM)eseedhouse Wrote:
(02-17-2016, 07:04 PM)GrammaBear Wrote: and just last week the GP added spironolactone which is a diuretic.

This is one of the "potassium sparing" diuretics. I my case it spared so much potassium that it built up to toxic levels which paralyzed my muscles and I ended up in emergency. Too much potassium can kill you by stopping your heat. They blamed the spironolactone, which is no linger recommended for diabetics in my town.

So you might want to avoid salt supplements and high potassium foods (like potatoes, tomatoes, oranges, and of course bananas). All the "low sodium" products in the supermarket use boatloads of potassium to make the food taste more salty.

You might not have a problem with it, but I suggest you get your electrolyte levels measured at least once a year no matter what diuretic you are on.

Diuretics were the first pill that helped high blood pressure, and they are still generally a first line treatment.

My, my - you had quite a time of it with spironolactone. So sorry that happened to you. I do have my electrolyte levels measured about every 3 months simply because I tend to have hyponatremia freuqently. My kidney doctor was not pleased to see I was on spironolactone, and I don't suppose he will be happy that the GP put me back on it. Thanks for the info on potassium and foods that contain it.

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