Hello Guest, Welcome to Apnea Board !
As a guest, you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use.
To post a message, you must create a free account using a valid email address.

or Create an Account


New Posts   Today's Posts

How to read the RES MED S BiPap Date
#11
(09-14-2013, 02:37 PM)me50 Wrote: I have the software loaded and can read the info .....they have a glossary that helped clear up abbreviated terms, indexes and the like.

Not too sure I understand the wake, sleep, time.....as this just doesn't add up

Did you go to sleep around 11:30 PM and wake up around 6:44 AM? that is what the scan shows and that you slept a little over 7 hours
[/quote]

That was just too easy! That's it. When I was going through sleep studies. I was told I would stop breathing 59 times an hour...averaging 33 seconds per episode with the longest 139. From what I can pick up.....I am now running about 16 to 17 episodes a night - which if correct is very encouraging...from my perspective.

The total AHI is 16.57 and that has been about the same each of the past 5 nights. Am I understanding my sleep issues right?
Post Reply Post Reply
#12

The total AHI is 16.57 and that has been about the same each of the past 5 nights. Am I understanding my sleep issues right?
[/quote]

I think that your AHI of 16.57 is per hour. It would be helpful if you show the full data from your stats in the software.

Lots to learn, I know!! I am in the same boat!
Post Reply Post Reply
#13
(09-14-2013, 02:37 PM)me50 Wrote: I have the software loaded and can read the info .....they have a glossary that helped clear up abbreviated terms, indexes and the like.

Not too sure I understand the wake, sleep, time.....as this just doesn't add up

Did you go to sleep around 11:30 PM and wake up around 6:44 AM? that is what the scan shows and that you slept a little over 7 hours
[/quote]

That is it. Thanks! I have yet, another question.....under the heading AHI 16.57 the break down is Hyponea 1.78, Apnea 0, Obstructive 6.99, and Clear Airway 7.81. What does Clear Airway mean? I would think that is a good thing, however, it is obviously not, since it is a component of the total AHI reading.

Post Reply Post Reply


#14

That is it. Thanks! I have yet, another question.....under the heading AHI 16.57 the break down is Hyponea 1.78, Apnea 0, Obstructive 6.99, and Clear Airway 7.81. What does Clear Airway mean? I would think that is a good thing, however, it is obviously not, since it is a component of the total AHI reading.
[/quote]

"Clear Airway Event" is another way of saying "Central Apnea Event". More on central apnea events on our Wiki, here. There is a slight difference, and maybe someone else can expand on this, but they're basically the same. There is no real true way to determine a Central Apnea event using today's CPAPs (you need a sleep study for that), so to play it safe, the manufacturers sometimes use the term "clear airway event" instead of central apnea event to indicate that it's not an obstructive event, but most likely is a central event.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SuperSleeper
Apnea Board Administrator
http://www.ApneaBoard.com
Post Reply Post Reply
#15
(09-14-2013, 12:01 PM)justMongo Wrote:
(09-14-2013, 08:42 AM)Ed Overstreetq Wrote: I am in my 5th day with the BIPAP machine.....and I have no clue how to read the info data which must be info about my sleeping, leakage, breathing data. Is there a place to go where this is explained?

I am averaging 7 plus hours a night masked up.........one thing I have noticed, besides looking at the ceiling a lot, is I do not make the 3 to 4 trips to the bathroom nightly.

Five days in and you're getting 7 hours -- you're doing great.

OSA causes blood pressure to rise to try to keep oxygen flowing to cells. Elevated BP pushes fluid through the kidney nephrons. So, that is a possible explanation for less frequent need to void urine.

I've had mine about 3 weeks now, and wasn't doing good at all. The pressures were so high it would puff my cheeks out and severally hurt my ear drums. I took it into Aperia Healthcare where I got it, and they couldn't change the pressure sitting with an order from the doctor. The next thing I'm being told is they don't know how to change them.
Finally, I called Resptronics and got hold of a guy that walked me right though reducing the pressures, telling me that when I felt "to comfortable" I should step the pressures up, but only 1/2 pound at a time.

Post Reply Post Reply
#16
(09-15-2013, 09:44 AM)Ed Overstreetq Wrote: I have yet, another question.....under the heading AHI 16.57 the break down is Hyponea 1.78, Apnea 0, Obstructive 6.99, and Clear Airway 7.81. What does Clear Airway mean? I would think that is a good thing, however, it is obviously not, since it is a component of the total AHI reading.

Hi Ed, for less than a week's therapy so far your numbers are definitely looking good. The ideal is to have an AHI (sum of obstructive apnea, central and hypopnea) under 5. So that's your target.

There are basically two types of apnea - obstructive and central (or clear airway). Obstructive apnea occurs when your airway collapses or your tongue falls back blocking your throat. The lungs and diaphragm keep trying to breathe, but because of the blockage, no air is getting through.

The central is quite a different beast. In this case there's no blockage, but your diaphragm isn't trying to breathe. The message from the brain stem which controls each individual breath isn't getting through. A lot of people seem to get centrals as they transition from wakefulness to sleep or vice versa. That's not too much of an issue. On the other hand, if you get a lot while you are asleep, that could be a significant issue and needs specific treatment (usually involving a more expensive ASV type machine).

A further option is that too high a pressure can sometimes cause central apneas. However in your case you still have a reasonably high obstructive apnea, so you probably need a higher pressure to take care of that.

If you can post part of the flow chart, then people on here can get a better understanding of what's happening, and possibly where you need to look next.
DeepBreathing
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com


Bed

INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
Post Reply Post Reply


#17
(11-02-2013, 05:23 PM)DeepBreathing Wrote: A lot of people seem to get centrals as they transition from wakefulness to sleep or vice versa. That's not too much of an issue. On the other hand, if you get a lot while you are asleep, that could be a significant issue and needs specific treatment (usually involving a more expensive ASV type machine).

A further option is that too high a pressure can sometimes cause central apneas. However in your case you still have a reasonably high obstructive apnea, so you probably need a higher pressure to take care of that.

Hi Ed Overstreetq,

It is not uncommon for PAP treatment cause some people to have central apneas in the early weeks/months of PAP therapy. Usually, over the course of the first few months of therapy, the number of central apneas decreases to well under 5 per hour as the body gradually gets accustomed to PAP therapy.

If I remember correctly, the central apnea index (CAI) is not considered high enough to warrant insurance company payment for a more expensive ASV type of machine unless the CAI is at least 5 or 15 (varies from one health insurance company to the next), and unless the CAI is larger than the OAI (meaning central apneas outnumber obstructive apneas), and unless an ASV titration study has been done which showed that ASV therapy reduces AHI to 5 or less, or if AHI still higher than 5 then ASV therapy reduces AHI by at least 50%. Something like that.

My personal opinion is that we should not be more concerned about central apneas than obstructive apneas. I think a central apnea which lasts 30 seconds is not more worrisome than an obstructive apnea which lasts 30 seconds, although both would be very disruptive to healthy sleep and should be treated if possible, even if our health insurance company refuses to reimburse us.

Our doctor should give us a prescription for an ASV machine (or CPAP, APAP, whatever) based on whether he/she believes we would benefit from it, not based on whether our insurance company would pay for it or not.

Whether we need ASV treatment is a different question than whether we can get an insurance company to help pay for it. Sometimes we need to pay full cost ourselves, or with help from friends, family, church, etc.

Cost of brand new ASV machine is less than $2,000 on internet (for example, from Supplier #2 on our Suppliers List), and used machines will be much less than that.

Take care,
--- Vaughn

Membership in the Advisory Member group should not be understood as in any way implying medical expertise or qualification for advising Sleep Apnea patients concerning their treatment. The Advisory Member group provides advice and suggestions to Apnea Board administrators and staff on matters concerning Apnea Board operation and administrative policies - not on matters concerning treatment for Sleep Apnea. I think it is now too late to change the name of the group but I think Voting Member group would perhaps have been a more descriptive name for the group.
Post Reply Post Reply
#18
(11-03-2013, 03:39 AM)vsheline Wrote: My personal opinion is that we should not be more concerned about central apneas than obstructive apneas. I think a central apnea which lasts 30 seconds is not more worrisome than an obstructive apnea which lasts 30 seconds, although both would be very disruptive to healthy sleep and should be treated if possible, even if our health insurance company refuses to reimburse us.

A central is no more concerning than an obstructive apnea, but no less concerning either. They are both a cessation of breathing, with all that goes with that. It does worry me when I see people on the forums saying we can ignore central apneas - that's certainly not the advice I get from my doctor.
DeepBreathing
Apnea Board Moderator
www.ApneaBoard.com


Bed

INFORMATION ON APNEA BOARD FORUMS OR ON APNEABOARD.COM SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED AS MEDICAL ADVICE. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN BEFORE SEEKING TREATMENT FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS, INCLUDING SLEEP APNEA. INFORMATION POSTED ON THE APNEA BOARD WEB SITE AND FORUMS ARE PERSONAL OPINION ONLY AND NOT NECESSARILY A STATEMENT OF FACT.
Post Reply Post Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  advice on setting up an auto-bipap bob simons 15 9,275 Yesterday, 11:38 PM
Last Post: Sleepster
  High CA in PSG and with Bipap J Duffy 5 106 10-20-2017, 08:06 PM
Last Post: bonjour
  BiPAP Induced Central Apneas for New User (help)? STB123 30 775 10-19-2017, 10:25 AM
Last Post: STB123
Exclaimation CPAP Machine Choices - read this before you accept a new machine SuperSleeper 49 21,442 10-18-2017, 09:21 PM
Last Post: Sleepster
  newbie with AHI~50 & a new dream station biPAP rbookman 27 584 10-18-2017, 11:30 AM
Last Post: rbookman
  ResMed Airsense 10 Setting Date Problem Reuven Gruber 10 928 10-13-2017, 10:46 AM
Last Post: jaswilliams
  Which BiPap to get Lanco 4 155 10-07-2017, 08:06 AM
Last Post: Sleeprider

Forum Jump:

New Posts   Today's Posts




About Apnea Board

Apnea Board is an educational web site designed to empower Sleep Apnea patients.

For any more information, please use our contact form.