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Humidifiers not safe - seriously?
#11
I pulled my A10 part way off the table during the first couple of nights I began using the machine. The water in the tank must have sloshed enough to get somewhere it shouldn't have. The machine stopped blowing. I woke up, set the machine upright and re-started. It has worked fine ever since. The next day, I called the DME and and picked up a longer hose. Before long, I started using a ClimateLine heated hose. I also learned how to arrange the hose so I wouldn't snag the machine off the side table.

Besides, distilled water is pretty much non-conductive. Circuit boards are cleaned with water after they have been soldered. Most (many) circuit boards now have a micro insulator coating added to protect them from moisture and the elements. With a two to three year warranty on most machines, I am sure the manufacturers have considered this issue.

Personally, the humidifier has solved my dry mouth at night issue. I just regret not having an A10 years ago!

Jeff
Sleep is worth the effort.
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#12
I don't know what sensors they are using, but the ones I use with my Arduino projects, for humidity and pressure have the sensor surface open to the air, so also to water. If water gets inside that little hole or grid my guess is that is will not get out of there any time soon.

You never know what will happen until it does. You ever get water on your computer keyboard and have it get under those little silicon cups that are the switches. Nothing shorts, but it does not dry out fast and the keyboard will not work right.
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#13
(04-17-2016, 06:55 AM)FrankNichols Wrote: I understand the power supply is outside the unit and is 12v, so should be safe for me, that was not my point, my point was was the unit damaging itself.
then, er, why say this: "Here we have a machine that plugs into a wall socket (Mains for you brits) and it has a water tank integrated into it." ??


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#14
(04-17-2016, 03:05 PM)palerider Wrote:
(04-17-2016, 06:55 AM)FrankNichols Wrote: I understand the power supply is outside the unit and is 12v, so should be safe for me, that was not my point, my point was was the unit damaging itself.
then, er, why say this: "Here we have a machine that plugs into a wall socket (Mains for you brits) and it has a water tank integrated into it." ??

Because at least one thread attempted to connect a burned/vaporized power plug with water from the humidifier.

I am not saying that was the cause of the power plug, but it was considered in that thread.
I am not a Medical professional and I don't play one on the internet.
Started CPAP Therapy April 5, 2016
I'd Rather Be Sleeping
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#15
Have to love the internet, if you ask someone will know
Table of Aqueous Conductivities
Solution µS/cm mS/cm ppm
Totally pure water 0.055
Typical DI water 0.1
Distilled water 0.5
RO water 50-100 25-50
Domestic "tap" water 500-800 0.5-0.8 250-400
Potable water (max) 1055 1.055 528
Sea water 56,000 56 28,000
Brackish water 100,000 100 50,000

Now exactly what this all means is another matter. My guess is that for low voltage water is basically not conductive. I do know that the utility will sometimes drive around in a truck with DI water and use it to wash off the high voltage insulators on the power poles. It always makes me concerned when I see someone on a bucket truck spraying water on high voltage. Guess they do really sleep at a holiday inn at night Smile
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#16
(04-17-2016, 03:21 PM)PoolQ Wrote: Have to love the internet, if you ask someone will know
Table of Aqueous Conductivities
Solution µS/cm mS/cm ppm
Totally pure water 0.055
Typical DI water 0.1
Distilled water 0.5
RO water 50-100 25-50
Domestic "tap" water 500-800 0.5-0.8 250-400
Potable water (max) 1055 1.055 528
Sea water 56,000 56 28,000
Brackish water 100,000 100 50,000

Now exactly what this all means is another matter. My guess is that for low voltage water is basically not conductive. I do know that the utility will sometimes drive around in a truck with DI water and use it to wash off the high voltage insulators on the power poles. It always makes me concerned when I see someone on a bucket truck spraying water on high voltage. Guess they do really sleep at a holiday inn at night Smile

Water is non-conductive, it's the "impurities" that kill you Smile
I am not a Medical professional and I don't play one on the internet.
Started CPAP Therapy April 5, 2016
I'd Rather Be Sleeping
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#17
I kind of like having a separate power supply for my breathing machine. It provides the opportunity to use a 12/24 volt brick rather than having to up convert to 120v and then back down again. Much more efficient. Also, if the power supply were built into the machine, the whole machine would have to go in for repair or replacement if the power supply failed. For example, with a significant spike or lightning hit, there is a good chance that only the external power supply would be damaged. Much easier and cheaper to replace than the whole machine.

fos
Sleep is worth the effort.
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#18
Probably keeping the high voltage out of the machine was also a consideration. I do know it makes getting UL or ETL or CSA approval/recognition easier.

Dude
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#19
(04-17-2016, 03:23 PM)FrankNichols Wrote: Water is non-conductive, it's the "impurities" that kill you Smile

The substances that allow water to conduct are called "electrolytes".
The Wikipedia article on the subject seems pretty good.
Ed Seedhouse
VA7SDH

The above is my opinion.  It is just possible that I may, occasionally, be mistaken.

I am neither a Doctor, nor any other kind of medical professional.

Everything put together sooner or later falls apart.
Your brain is not the boss.
Our forefathers took drugs.
He's no fun he fell right over.
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#20
well, all I can say is that low voltage and water don't get along, anybody that's ever dunked their phone knows just how conductive water is at 'low voltages' Big Grin
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